1922 Australian federal election

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1922 Australian federal election
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
  1919 16 December 1922 (1922-12-16) 1925  

All 75 seats in the House of Representatives
38 seats were needed for a majority in the House
19 (of the 36) seats in the Senate
 First partySecond partyThird party
  Hughes16-23.jpg Matthew Charlton 1925.jpg Earle Page 1920.jpg
Leader Billy Hughes Matthew Charlton Earle Page
Party Nationalist Labor Country
Leader since14 November 1916 16 May 1922 5 April 1921
Leader's seat Bendigo (Vic)
won North Sydney (NSW)
Hunter (NSW) Cowper (NSW)
Last election37 seats26 seats11 seats
Seats won26 seats29 seats14 seats
Seat changeDecrease2.svg11Increase2.svg3Increase2.svg3
Percentage51.20%48.80%
SwingDecrease2.svg2.90%Increase2.svg2.90%

Australia 1922 federal election.png
Popular vote by state with graphs indicating the number of seats won. As this is an IRV election, seat totals are not determined by popular vote by state but instead via results in each electorate.

Prime Minister before election

Billy Hughes
Nationalist

Subsequent Prime Minister

Stanley Bruce
Nationalist/Country coalition

The 1922 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 16 December 1922. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives, and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Nationalist Party, led by Prime Minister Billy Hughes lost its majority. However, the opposition Labor Party led by Matthew Charlton did not take office as the Nationalists sought a coalition with the fledgling Country Party led by Earle Page. The Country Party made Hughes's resignation the price for joining, and Hughes was replaced as Nationalist leader by Stanley Bruce.

Contents

Future Prime Minister Frank Forde and future opposition leader John Latham both entered parliament at this election.

Results

House of Representatives

Labor: 29 seats
Nationalist: 26 seats
Country: 14 seats
Independent: 1 seat
Liberal: 5 seats Australian House of Representatives, 1922.svg
  Labor: 29 seats
  Nationalist: 26 seats
  Country: 14 seats
  Independent: 1 seat
  Liberal: 5 seats
House of Reps (IRV) — 1922–25—Turnout 59.36% (Non-CV) — Informal 4.51%
PartyVotes%SwingSeatsChange
  Labor 665,14542.300.1929+3
  Nationalist 553,92035.239.852611
  Country 197,51312.56+3.3014+3
  Liberal Union 73,9394.70+4.705+5
  Majority Labor 10,3030.66+0.6600
  Industrial Labor 4,3310.28+0.0900
  Protestant Labor 3,6310.23+0.2300
  Independents 63,7124.05+1.0711
 Total1,572,514  75
Two-party-preferred (estimated)
  Nationalist WIN51.20−2.9040+3
  Labor 48.80+2.90290

Notes
Popular Vote
Labor
42.30%
Nationalist
35.23%
Country
12.56%
Liberal
4.70%
Independent/Others
5.22%
Two Party Preferred Vote
Coalition
51.20%
Labor
48.80%
Parliament Seats
Coalition
53.33%
Labor
38.67%
Liberal
6.67%
Independent
1.33%

Senate

Senate (P BV) — 1922–1925—Turnout 57.99% (Non-CV) — Informal 9.44%
PartyVotes%SwingSeats WonSeats HeldChange
  Labor 715,21945.70+2.861112+11
  Nationalist 567,08436.2310.1682411
  Country 203,26712.99+4.20000
  Liberal Union 43,7062.79+2.79000
  Socialist Labor 8,5510.55+0.55000
  Majority Labor 3,8130.24+0.24000
  Independents 23,4471.50+0.08000
 Total1,565,087  1936

Seats changing hands

SeatPre-1922SwingPost-1922
PartyMemberMarginMarginMemberParty
Adelaide, SA  Nationalist Reginald Blundell 0.88.03.6 George Edwin Yates Labor 
Balaclava, Vic  Nationalist William Watt N/A100.0100.0 William Watt Liberal 
Barker, SA  Nationalist John Livingston N/AN/A2.3 Malcolm Cameron Liberal 
Barton, NSW  Nationalistnotional - new seatN/A13.87.6 Frederick McDonald Labor 
Boothby, SA  Nationalist William Story N/AN/A4.7 Jack Duncan-Hughes Liberal 
Calare, NSW  Labor Thomas Lavelle 2.38.55.3 Neville Howse Nationalist 
Darwin, Tas  Nationalist George Bell 4.0N/A0.4 Joshua Whitsitt Country 
Denison, Tas  Nationalist William Laird Smith 3.94.30.4 David O'Keefe Labor 
Fremantle, WA  Nationalist Reginald Burchell N/A56.96.9 William Watson Independent 
Gippsland, Vic  Nationalist George Wise 5.218.112.9 Thomas Paterson Country 
Grey, SA  Nationalist Alexander Poynton 1.85.53.7 Andrew Lacey Labor 
Henty, Vic  Independent Frederick Francis 2.98.75.8 Frederick Francis Nationalist 
Kalgoorlie, WA  Nationalist George Foley 1.47.17.4 Albert Green Labor 
Kooyong, Vic  Nationalist Robert Best 14.314.90.6 John Latham Liberal 
Macquarie, NSW  Labor Samuel Nicholls 3.20.60.2 Arthur Manning Nationalist 
New England, NSW  Nationalist Alexander Hay*7.3N/A8.5 Victor Thompson Country 
Northern Territory, NT new division0.4 H. G. Nelson Labor 
Richmond, NSW  Nationalist Walter Massy-Greene 22.524.03.3 Roland Green Country 
Riverina, NSW  Nationalist John Chanter N/A54.34.3 William Killen Country 
Wakefield, SA  Nationalist Richard Foster N/AN/A5.3 Richard Foster Liberal 
Wannon, Vic  Nationalist Arthur Rodgers 4.14.90.8 John McNeill Labor 
Wilmot, Tas  Nationalist Llewellyn Atkinson 10.2N/A11.2 Llewellyn Atkinson Country 

Post-election pendulum

GOVERNMENT SEATS
Nationalist/Country coalition
Marginal
Macquarie (NSW) Neville Howse NAT00.2
Darwin (Tas) Joshua Whitsitt CP00.4 v NAT
Corio (Vic) John Lister NAT00.8
Bendigo (Vic) Geoffry Hurry NAT01.7
Herbert (Qld) Fred Bamford NAT01.7
Brisbane (Qld) Donald Cameron NAT02.0
Richmond (NSW) Roland Green CP03.3
Oxley (Qld) James Bayley NAT03.3
Bass (Tas) Syd Jackson NAT03.6
Corangamite (Vic) William Gibson CP03.9
Riverina (NSW) William Killen CP04.3
Lang (NSW) Elliot Johnson NAT04.4
Maranoa (Qld) James Hunter CP04.4
Calare (NSW) Neville Howse NAT05.3
Flinders (Vic) Stanley Bruce NAT05.6 v LIB
Henty (Vic) Frederick Francis NAT05.8 v NAT
Fairly safe
Franklin (Tas) Alfred Seabrook NAT06.3
Fawkner (Vic) George Maxwell NAT08.0
North Sydney (NSW) Billy Hughes NAT08.2 v Const.
New England (NSW) Victor Thompson CP08.5
Darling Downs (Qld) Littleton Groom NAT08.6
Perth (WA) Edward Mann NAT08.9
Moreton (Qld) Josiah Francis NAT09.5
Safe
Wide Bay (Qld) Edward Corser NAT10.5
Eden-Monaro (NSW) Austin Chapman NAT11.1
Wilmot (Tas) Llewellyn Atkinson CP11.2
Robertson (NSW) Sydney Gardner NAT11.8
Parkes (NSW) Charles Marr NAT11.8
Wentworth (NSW) Walter Marks NAT11.9
Gippsland (Vic) Thomas Paterson CP12.9 v NAT
Indi (Vic) Robert Cook CP13.2
Lilley (Qld) George Mackay NAT15.2 v IND
Parramatta (NSW) Eric Bowden NAT15.4
Cowper (NSW) Earle Page CP17.3 v NAT
Very safe
Echuca (Vic) William Hill CP20.3 v NAT
Wimmera (Vic) Percy Stewart CP21.2 v IND
Forrest (WA) John Prowse CP29.5 v NAT
Martin (NSW) Herbert Pratten NATunopposed
Swan (WA) Henry Gregory CPunopposed
Warringah (NSW) Granville Ryrie NATunopposed
NON-GOVERNMENT SEATS
Australian Labor Party and Liberal Party
Marginal
Gwydir (NSW) Lou Cunningham ALP00.1 v CP
Northern Territory (NT) H. G. Nelson ALP00.4 v IND
Denison (Tas) David O'Keefe ALP00.4
Kooyong (Vic) John Latham LIB00.6 v NAT
Wannon (Vic) John McNeill ALP00.8
Ballaarat (Vic) Charles McGrath ALP01.7
Barker (SA) Malcolm Cameron LIB02.3 v ALP
Capricornia (Qld) Frank Forde ALP02.5
Batman (Vic) Frank Brennan ALP03.3
Adelaide (SA) George Edwin Yates ALP03.6 v LIB
Grey (SA) Andrew Lacey ALP03.7
Werriwa (NSW) Bert Lazzarini ALP03.9
Boothby (SA) Jack Duncan-Hughes LIB04.7 v ALP
Hume (NSW) Parker Moloney ALP04.9
Wakefield (SA) Richard Foster LIB05.3 v ALP
Fairly safe
Kalgoorlie (WA) Albert Green ALP07.4
Barton (NSW) Frederick McDonald ALP07.6
Angas (SA) Moses Gabb ALP08.0 v LIB
Reid (NSW) Percy Coleman ALP08.6
East Sydney (NSW) John West ALP09.1
Safe
Kennedy (Qld) Charles McDonald ALP11.6
South Sydney (NSW) Edward Riley ALP11.7
Maribyrnong (Vic) James Fenton ALP13.2
Darling (NSW) Arthur Blakeley ALP15.1
Hindmarsh (SA) Norman Makin ALP18.6
Newcastle (NSW) David Watkins ALP19.4
Very safe
Bourke (Vic) Frank Anstey ALP20.1
Dalley (NSW) William Mahony ALP20.9
Melbourne Ports (Vic) James Mathews ALP23.1
Cook (NSW) Edward Charles Riley ALP24.9
West Sydney (NSW) William Lambert ALP25.4 v IND
Melbourne (Vic) William Maloney ALP27.2
Yarra (Vic) James Scullin ALP28.0
Balaclava (Vic) William Watt LIBunopposed
Hunter (NSW) Matthew Charlton ALPunopposed
Independents
Fremantle (WA) William Watson IND06.9 v ALP

See also

Notes

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