England women's national football team

Last updated

England
England crest 2009.svg
Nickname(s) Three Lionesses
The Lionesses
Association The Football Association
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Phil Neville
Captain Steph Houghton
Most caps Fara Williams (170)
Top scorer Kelly Smith (46)
FIFA code ENG
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First colours
Kit left arm eng19aw.png
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 5 Decrease2.svg 2 (12 July 2019) [1]
Highest2 (March 2018)
Lowest14 (June 2004)
First international
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 2–3 England  Flag of England.svg
(Greenock, Scotland; 18 November 1972)
Biggest win
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 0–13 England  Flag of England.svg
(Tapolca, Hungary; 27 October 2005)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 8–0 England  Flag of England.svg
(Moss, Norway; 4 June 2000)
World Cup
Appearances5 (first in 1995 )
Best resultThird place (2015)
European Championship
Appearances8 (first in 1984 )
Best resultRunners-up (1984, 2009)

The England women's national football team has been governed by the Football Association (FA) since 1993, having been previously administered by the Women's Football Association (WFA). England played its first international match in November 1972 against Scotland. Although most national football teams represent a sovereign state, as a member of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, England is permitted by FIFA statutes to maintain its own national side that competes in all major tournaments, with the exception of the Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

The Football Association governing body of association football in England

The Football Association (FA) is the governing body of association football in England and the Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey, and the Isle of Man. Formed in 1863, it is the oldest football association in the world and is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the amateur and professional game in its territory.

The Women's Football Association (WFA) was the governing body of women's football in England. It was formed in 1969 and was disbanded in 1993, as responsibility for overseeing all aspects of the amateur game of women's football in England passed to The Football Association.

The Scotland women's national football team represents Scotland in international women's football competitions. Since 1998, the team has been governed by the Scottish Football Association (SFA). Scotland qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time in 2019, and qualified for their first UEFA Women's Euro in 2017. As of July 2019, the team was 22nd in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Contents

England have qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup five times, reaching the quarter-finals on three occasions; in 1995, 2007, and 2011, finishing third in 2015 and fourth in 2019. They reached the final of the UEFA Women's Championship in 1984 and 2009.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

1995 FIFA Womens World Cup 1995 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway. The tournament featured 12 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 12 teams were drawn into three groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams and two best third-ranked teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the quarter-finals and culminating with the final at Råsunda Stadium on 18 June 1995.

2007 FIFA Womens World Cup 2007 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fifth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was an international association football competition for women held in China from 10 to 30 September 2007. Originally, China was to host the 2003 edition, but the outbreak of SARS in that country forced that event to be moved to the United States. FIFA immediately granted the 2007 event to China, which meant that no new host nation was chosen competitively until the voting was held for the 2011 Women's World Cup.

History

Early years

The success of the men's national football team at the 1966 FIFA World Cup led to an upsurge of interest in football from women within England. The Women's Football Association (WFA) was established in 1969 as an attempt to organise the women's game. [2] That same year, Harry Batt formed an independent English team that competed in the Fédération Internationale Européenne de Football Féminine (FIEFF) European Cup. [3] :43 Batt's team also participated in two FIEFF World Cups held in Italy (1970) and Mexico (1971). [4] [5]

England national football team Mens association football team representing England

The England national football team represents England in senior men's international football and is controlled by The Football Association, the governing body for football in England. It competes in the three major international tournaments; the FIFA World Cup, the UEFA European Championship and the UEFA Nations League. England, as a country of the United Kingdom, is not a member of the International Olympic Committee and therefore the national team does not compete at the Olympic Games.

1966 FIFA World Cup 1966 edition of the FIFA World Cup

The 1966 FIFA World Cup was an international association football tournament played in England between 11 and 30 July 1966. It was the eighth FIFA World Cup, the first having been played in 1930. England defeated West Germany 4–2 in the final to win their first World Cup; the match had finished at 2–2 after 90 minutes and went to extra time, when Geoff Hurst scored two goals to complete his hat-trick, the first to be scored in a World Cup final, with spectators storming the pitch during the fourth goal. England were the fifth nation to win the event, and the third host nation to win after Uruguay in 1930 and Italy in 1934. Brazil were the defending champions, but they failed to progress from the group stage.

The 1970 Women's World Cup was a non-FIFA-sanctioned association football tournament for women which took place in Italy in July 1970. It was won by Denmark, represented by Boldklubben Femina.

Following an UEFA recommendation in 1972 for national associations to incorporate the women's game, the Football Association (FA) rescinded its 50-year ban on women playing on English Football League grounds. [6] [7] Shortly after, Eric Worthington was tasked by the WFA to assemble an official women's national team. England competed in its first international match against Scotland in Greenock on 18 November 1972, 100 years to the month after the first men's international. [2] [8] The team overturned a two-goal deficit to defeat their northern opponents 3–2, with Sylvia Gore scoring England's first international goal. [9] Tom Tranter replaced Worthington as long term manager of the women's national football team and remained in that position for the next six years. [3] :94

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

English Football League League competition featuring professional association football clubs from England and Wales

The English Football League (EFL) is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales. Founded in 1888 as the Football League, the league is the oldest such competition in world football. It was the top-level football league in England from its foundation until 1992, when the top 22 clubs split away to form the Premier League.

Eric Senior Worthington was an English professional footballer and football coach who played as a forward. After a playing career which included spells in the Football League with Watford and Bradford City, he was appointed the first ever manager of the England women's national team in 1972. He later coached the men's national teams of Australia and Papua New Guinea. He is a member of Australia's Football Hall of Fame.

1979–1993: Progress under Reagan

Martin Reagan was appointed to replace Tranter in 1979. [3] :100 England reached the final of the inaugural European Competition for Women's Football, after beating Denmark 3–1 on aggregate in the semi-finals. Despite resolute defending, including a spectacular goal line clearance from captain Carol Thomas, the England team lost the first away leg 1–0 against Sweden, after a header from Pia Sundhage, but won the second home leg by the same margin, with a goal from Linda Curl. [10] England lost the subsequent penalty shootout 4–3. Theresa Wiseman saved Helen Johansson's penalty but both Curl and Lorraine Hanson had their spot kicks saved by Elisabeth Leidinge. [11]

Charles Martin Reagan, known as Martin Reagan, was an English professional footballer and coach / manager. During his playing career, Reagan played in the Football League for York City, Hull City, Middlesbrough, Shrewsbury Town, Portsmouth and Norwich City. He later coached the England women's national football team. Prior to his football career Reagan served as a Staff Sgt Tank Commander in World War II.

The 1984 European Competition for Women's Football was won by Sweden on penalties against England. It comprised four qualifying groups, the winner of each going through to the semi-finals which were played over two legs, home and away. As only sixteen teams took part, the competition could not be granted official status. Matches comprised two halves of 35 minutes, played with a size four football.

Denmark womens national football team womens national association football team representing Denmark

The Denmark women's national football team represents Denmark in international women's football. The team is controlled by the Danish Football Association (DBU).

At the 1987 European Competition for Women's Football, England again reached the semi-finals but lost 3–2 after extra time against holders Sweden, in a repeat of the previous final. The team settled for fourth, after losing the third place play-off against Italy 2–1. [12] Reagan was sacked after England's 6–1 quarter-final loss against Germany at UEFA Women's Euro 1991, which left them unable to qualify for the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup. John Bilton was appointed as head coach in 1991 after Barrie Williams's brief tenure. [3] :103–104

The 1987 European Competition for Women's Football took place in Norway. It was won by the hosts in a final against defending champions Sweden. Once again, the competition began with four qualifying groups, but this time a host nation was selected for the semi-final stage onwards after the four semi-finalists were identified.

The 1991 UEFA Women's Championship took place in Denmark. It was won by Germany in a final against Norway in a repeat of the previous edition's final. Eighteen teams entered qualifying, which was enough to make the competition the first fully official one, so the name was changed to the UEFA Women's Championship.

1991 FIFA Womens World Cup 1991 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated, maker of M&M's candy. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

1993–1998: FA involvement

In 1993, the FA took over the running of women's football in England from the WFA, replacing Bilton with Ted Copeland as national team manager. [3] :105 England managed to qualify for UEFA Women's Euro 1995, having previously missed out on the last three editions, but were beaten 6–2 on aggregate over two legs against Germany. [13] Reaching the European semi-finals granted England a place at the World Cup for the first time. The team advanced from the group stage of the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden, but lost out again to Germany 3–0 in the quarter-finals. [14]

1998–2013: Development under Powell

Hope Powell became the team's first full-time head coach in June 1998, succeeding her former coach Copeland. [15] The European Championship expanded in 1997 to eight teams and moved from a biennial event to a quadrennial one. England qualified via the play-offs for the 2001 competition held in Germany, despite recording their biggest loss (away against Norway 8–0) during qualification, but did not advance past the group stage. [16] England automatically qualified as hosts in 2005, but again did not make it to the semi-finals. [17]

Qualification for the World Cup changed for the 1999 edition. European qualifiers were introduced, so that teams no longer needed to rely on advancing to the latter stages of the European Championship. England qualified unbeaten for the 2007 World Cup in China, winning Group 5 in the European qualifiers and recording their biggest win (away against Hungary, 13–0) in the process, ending a 12-year hiatus from the competition. [18] [19] After coming second in their group, they advanced into the quarter-finals to face the United States but lost 3–0. [20]

In May 2009, central contracts were implemented to help players focus on full-time training without having to fit it around full-time employment. [21] [22] Three months later, at the European Championships in Finland, England marked their return to the recently expanded 12-team competition by reaching the final for the first time in 25 years. They advanced from Group C to the quarter-finals by virtue of being the top third-placed team, beating both the hosts and the Netherlands in the knockout stage on the way to the final. There they lost 6–2 to reigning champions Germany. [23]

England reached their third World Cup in 2011, having won Group 5 and their play-off 5–2 over two legs against Switzerland. [24] [25] In Germany, they topped Group B – ahead of eventual winners Japan. [26] England were paired with France in the quarter-finals, with the match ending in a 1–1 draw. England had taken the lead with Jill Scott's chip, only to have Élise Bussaglia equalise with two minutes remaining. After extra time ended in stalemate, they lost the ensuing penalty shootout 4–3. Karen Bardsley had saved Camille Abily's initial penalty but misses by Claire Rafferty and Faye White sent England out of the competition. [27]

Powell left the role in August 2013 after a poor showing at the UEFA Women's Euro 2013, with England bowing out after the group stage. [15]

2013–2017: Sampson era

Welshman Mark Sampson succeeded Powell as England manager. England qualified for their third successive World Cup in August 2014 with a game to spare, winning all ten matches and topping Group 6. [28] England played their first international match at the new Wembley Stadium, home to the men's national team, in a friendly against the reigning European champions Germany on 23 November 2014. England had not played Germany since their heavy defeat in the European Championship final five years earlier. They lost the match 3–0, marking the 20th attempt at which England had failed to record an official win over Germany. [29] [30]

At the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada, England lost their opening group game to France but won their remaining group games against Mexico and Colombia, easing through to the last 16 to play 1995 champions Norway. A 2–1 win set up a meeting with hosts Canada in the quarter-finals. Despite facing not only a strong Canadian team but a capacity partisan crowd at BC Place in Vancouver, England progressed to the semifinals of the Women's World Cup for the first time in their history with another 2–1 win, which also marked the first semifinal appearance by any England senior team since the men reached the last four of the 1990 World Cup in Italy. Playing reigning World Cup holders Japan in the semi-finals, England conceded a penalty kick, which Aya Miyama converted past Karen Bardsley. Japan then conceded a penalty as Yuki Ogimi clipped Steph Houghton and Fara Williams slotted it past Ayumi Kaihori to level the game. However, in the last minute of the game, Laura Bassett scored an own goal to send Japan through to the final. [31] England eventually finished in third place by beating Germany 1–0 after extra time after a Williams penalty, their first time beating their archrivals in the women’s game. It marked the best finish for any England senior team since the men’s team famously won the 1966 World Cup as hosts. [32]

England qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 in the Netherlands and won all three of their group games at the tournament. England beat France 1–0 in the quarter-finals before meeting hosts and eventual champions, the Netherlands. In the semi-finals, England conceded three goals without reply and were knocked out of the tournament. [33]

In September 2017, Sampson was sacked from his role as manager by the FA after evidence of "inappropriate and unacceptable" behaviour was uncovered during his tenure at Bristol Academy. [34] The FA in January 2019 agreed to pay a "significant" financial settlement to Sampson, on the week his claim for unfair dismissal was due to be heard in court. [35] He was replaced by Phil Neville, who had played at Manchester United – including in their 1999 treble winning season – and Everton and been capped by the England men but had never before held a high-profile managing job.

2018–present: Neville's arrival

National team during 2019 Women's World Cup. England Women's World Cup 2019.jpg
National team during 2019 Women's World Cup.

After being appointed manager, Neville's first games in charge were at the 2018 SheBelieves Cup. In their first game, England defeated France 4–1, then drew 2–2 against Germany. They went into the final game against the United States with the opportunity to win the tournament, but lost 1–0. Second place was the highest England had finished at the SheBelieves Cup. [36]

England continued with World Cup qualification in 2018. On 6 April they drew 0–0 against Wales. After the qualifying games in June, England and Wales were guaranteed the first two spots in qualifying Group 1, [37] and England's 3–0 win against Wales in August 2018 saw them clinch the group and qualify for the World Cup finals. [38]

In the 2019 SheBelieves Cup, England won the tournament for the first time after winning their first match 2–1 against Brazil, drawing 2–2 with the United States and defeating Japan 3–0. [39]

In the 2019 Women's World Cup in France, England won group D, beating local rivals Scotland and archrival Argentina to qualify for the knockout phase, before beating Japan. England beat both Cameroon and then Norway 3–0 to advance to the semifinal against United States in Lyon – the team’s third straight major tournament semifinal. However, similar to the previous two tournaments, England once again failed to make the final, losing 2–1. Alex Morgan scored the winner after Ellen White had equalised following Christen Press' opening goal, while White had an equaliser ruled out by VAR and Houghton had a penalty saved by Alyssa Naeher.

Competitive record

England women's team in February 2015 England Women's Vs USA (16365773538).jpg
England women's team in February 2015

FIFA World Cup

England have qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup five times (1995, 2007, 2011, 2015, 2019) and failed to qualify for three competitions (1991, 1999, 2003). The England team reached the quarter-finals on three occasions, losing out to Germany in 1995, the United States in 2007 and France on penalties in 2011. In 2015, however, England earned the bronze medal for the first time, under Mark Sampson, by beating Germany in the third place play-off.

World Cup finals
YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did not qualify
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 Quarter-finals420269−3
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Did not qualify
Flag of the United States.svg 2003
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Quarter-finals412186+2
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Quarter-finals422063+3
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Third place7502107+3
Flag of France.svg 2019 Fourth place7502135+8
Total5/82615474330+13
*Draws include knockout matches decided by penalty shoot-outs.

UEFA European Championship

England first entered the UEFA Women's Championship in 1984, reaching the final that year and in 2009. The team have reached the semi-finals on three other occasions (1989, 1995, 2017), but failed to make it out of the group stage in three other editions (2001, 2005, 2013). England did not qualify in 1989, 1991, 1993 and 1997.

YearResultGPWD*LGFGA
1984 Runners-up430142
Flag of Norway.svg 1987 Fourth place200235
Flag of Germany.svg 1989 Did not qualify
Flag of Denmark.svg 1991
Flag of Italy.svg 1993
Flag of England.svg Flag of Germany.svg Flag of Norway.svg Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 Semi-finals200226
Flag of Norway.svg Flag of Sweden.svg 1997 Did not qualify
Flag of Germany.svg 2001 Group stage301218
Flag of England.svg 2005 Group stage310245
Flag of Finland.svg 2009 Runners-up63121214
Flag of Sweden.svg 2013 Group stage301237
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2017 Semi-finals5401114
Flag of England.svg 2021 Qualified as hosts
Total9/1328113144051
*Draws include knockout matches decided by penalty shoot-outs.
**Red border colour denotes tournament was held on home soil.

Olympic Games

England does not participate in the Women's Olympic Football Tournament, as the country does not have its own National Olympic Committee (NOC). Since England falls under the jurisdiction of the British Olympic Association, remit for an Olympic football team requires support from all four Home Nation associations. The Scottish Football Association (SFA), the Football Association of Wales (FAW) and the Irish Football Association (IFA) have all previously objected to the premise over fears that the team would erode the independence of their individual football associations. However, members of its team have played for the Great Britain women's Olympic football team at London 2012 having been granted automatic qualification as the host nation. [40] The Home Nations once again agreed to a GB Women's team in time for Tokyo 2020 with England's result at the 2019 World Cup counting as the team's attempt to qualify. They qualified as one of the last three remaining European nations. [41]

Minor tournaments

YearRoundPositionGPWD*LGSGA
Flag of England.svg 1976 Pony Home ChampionshipWinners, group stage1st220091
Flag of Italy.svg 1969 Unofficial European Championship Third place3rd210154
Flag of Italy.svg 1979 Unofficial European Championship Semi-finals4th421164
Flag of Japan.svg 1981 Mundialito Group stage3rd210141
Flag of Italy.svg 1984 Mundialito Semi-finals3rd402236
Flag of Italy.svg 1985 Mundialito Winners1st2311135
Flag of Italy.svg 1988 Mundialito Winners1st431082
Flag of the United States.svg 1990 North America CupGroup stage3rd411237
Flag of Portugal.svg 2002 Algarve Cup Group stage9th4103812
Flag of Portugal.svg 2005 Algarve Cup Group stage8th4310130
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Four Nations Tournament Group stage4th302130
Flag of Cyprus.svg 2009 Cyprus Cup Winners1st4310143
Flag of Cyprus.svg 2010 Cyprus Cup Group stage5th421165
Flag of South Korea.svg 2010 Peace Queen Cup Group stage2nd202000
Flag of Cyprus.svg 2011 Cyprus Cup Group stage5th420244
Flag of Cyprus.svg 2012 Cyprus Cup Group stage4th420257
Flag of Cyprus.svg 2013 Cyprus Cup Winners1st4310127
Flag of Cyprus.svg 2014 Cyprus Cup Runners-up2nd430172
Flag of Cyprus.svg 2015 Cyprus Cup Winners1st431082
Flag of the United States.svg 2016 SheBelieves Cup Group stage3rd301213
Flag of the United States.svg 2017 SheBelieves Cup Group stage3rd310223
Flag of the United States.svg 2018 SheBelieves Cup Runners-up2nd311164
Flag of the United States.svg 2019 SheBelieves Cup Winners1st321073
Total7 titles7538182214281

Players

For all past and present players who have appeared for the national team, see List of England women's international footballers
Caps, goals, and recent players may be outdated or incorrect, as the FA does not maintain an easily accessible database of historical statistics.

Current squad

The following 24 players were named to the squad for the friendly against Flag of Norway.svg  Norway on 3 September 2019. [42]

Caps and goals are updated as of 3 September 2019 after the match against Flag of Norway.svg  Norway.

Head coach: Phil Neville

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
1 GK Mary Earps (1993-03-07) 7 March 1993 (age 26)60 Flag of England.svg Manchester United
1 GK Sandy MacIver (1998-06-18) 18 June 1998 (age 21)00 Flag of the United States.svg Clemson Tigers
1 GK Ellie Roebuck (1999-09-23) 23 September 1999 (age 19)30 Flag of England.svg Manchester City
1 GK Carly Telford (1987-07-07) 7 July 1987 (age 32)230 Flag of England.svg Chelsea

2 DF Hannah Blundell (1994-05-25) 25 May 1994 (age 25)30 Flag of England.svg Chelsea
2 DF Millie Bright (1993-08-21) 21 August 1993 (age 26)330 Flag of England.svg Chelsea
2 DF Rachel Daly (1991-12-06) 6 December 1991 (age 27)293 Flag of the United States.svg Houston Dash
2 DF Steph Houghton (captain) (1988-04-23) 23 April 1988 (age 31)11413 Flag of England.svg Manchester City
2 DF Aoife Mannion (1995-09-24) 24 September 1995 (age 23)00 Flag of England.svg Manchester City
2 DF Abbie McManus (1993-01-14) 14 January 1993 (age 26)170 Flag of England.svg Manchester United
2 DF Anna Patten (1999-04-20) 20 April 1999 (age 20)00 Flag of the United States.svg South Carolina Gamecocks
2 DF Demi Stokes (1991-12-12) 12 December 1991 (age 27)561 Flag of England.svg Manchester City
2 DF Leah Williamson (1997-03-29) 29 March 1997 (age 22)100 Flag of England.svg Arsenal

3 MF Lucy Bronze (1991-10-28) 28 October 1991 (age 27)778 Flag of France.svg Lyon
3 MF Lucy Staniforth (1992-10-02) 2 October 1992 (age 26)122 Flag of England.svg Birmingham City
3 MF Georgia Stanway (1999-01-03) 3 January 1999 (age 20)152 Flag of England.svg Manchester City
3 MF Keira Walsh (1997-04-08) 8 April 1997 (age 22)220 Flag of England.svg Manchester City
3 MF Fara Williams (1984-01-25) 25 January 1984 (age 35)17240 Flag of England.svg Reading

4 FW Toni Duggan (1991-07-25) 25 July 1991 (age 28)7622 Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid
4 FW Bethany England (1994-06-03) 3 June 1994 (age 25)20 Flag of England.svg Chelsea
4 FW Melissa Lawley (1994-04-28) 28 April 1994 (age 25)111 Flag of England.svg Liverpool
4 FW Beth Mead (1995-05-09) 9 May 1995 (age 24)216 Flag of England.svg Arsenal
4 FW Nikita Parris (1994-03-10) 10 March 1994 (age 25)4314 Flag of France.svg Lyon
4 FW Jodie Taylor (1986-05-17) 17 May 1986 (age 33)4819 Flag of the United States.svg Reign FC

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up to the England squad within the last 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Karen Bardsley (1984-10-14) 14 October 1984 (age 34)810 Flag of England.svg Manchester City 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
GK Siobhan Chamberlain (1983-08-15) 15 August 1983 (age 36)500 Flag of England.svg Manchester United v. Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia, 9 October 2018

DF Alex Greenwood (1993-09-07) 7 September 1993 (age 26)413 Flag of France.svg Lyon v. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium, 29 August 2019 INJ
DF Gemma Bonner (1991-07-13) 13 July 1991 (age 28)111 Flag of England.svg Manchester City v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain, 9 April 2019
DF Gabrielle George (1997-02-02) 2 February 1997 (age 22)20 Flag of England.svg Everton Training camp, January 2019

MF Jade Moore (1990-10-22) 22 October 1990 (age 28)501 Flag of England.svg Reading v. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, 3 September 2019 INJ
MF Karen Carney RET (1987-08-01) 1 August 1987 (age 32)14432Retired 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
MF Jill Scott (1987-02-02) 2 February 1987 (age 32)14325 Flag of England.svg Manchester City 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
MF Isobel Christiansen (1991-09-20) 20 September 1991 (age 27)316 Flag of France.svg Lyon 2019 SheBelieves Cup
MF Jordan Nobbs (vice-captain) (1992-12-08) 8 December 1992 (age 26)567 Flag of England.svg Arsenal v. Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden, 11 November 2018

FW Fran Kirby (1993-06-29) 29 June 1993 (age 26)4513 Flag of England.svg Chelsea v. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium, 29 August 2019 INJ
FW Ellen White (1989-05-09) 9 May 1989 (age 30)8835 Flag of England.svg Manchester City 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
FW Chioma Ubogagu (1992-09-10) 10 September 1992 (age 26)31 Flag of Spain.svg Tacón v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain, 9 April 2019
FW Lauren Hemp (2000-08-07) 7 August 2000 (age 19)00 Flag of England.svg Manchester City 2019 SheBelieves Cup PRE
FW Chloe Kelly (1998-01-15) 15 January 1998 (age 21)10 Flag of England.svg Everton v. Flag of Austria.svg  Austria, 8 November 2018
FW Lauren Bruton (1992-11-22) 22 November 1992 (age 26)10 Flag of England.svg Reading v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan, 4 September 2018

Notes:

Records

Carol Thomas was the first player to reach 50 caps in 1985, before retiring from representative football later that year, having amassed 56 caps. Fara Williams holds the record for England appearances, having played 171 times since 2001. She overtook previous record holder Rachel Yankey in August 2014, in a friendly against Sweden. [43] Yankey had passed Gillian Coultard's 119 record England women caps in September 2012, in a European qualifying match against Croatia, and Peter Shilton's 125 record England international caps in June 2013, in a friendly against Japan. [44]

Kelly Smith has scored the most goals for England, with 46 over a 20-year international career. She surpassed Karen Walker's record of 40 goals in September 2010, in a World Cup qualifying play-off against Switzerland. [45]

Most capped players

Fara Williams is England's most capped player and second highest goalscorer with 40 goals in 171 appearances since 2001. Fara Williams England Ladies v Montenegro 5 4 2014 377.jpg
Fara Williams is England's most capped player and second highest goalscorer with 40 goals in 171 appearances since 2001.
#NameEngland careerCapsGoalsRef
1 Fara Williams 2001–17240 [46]
2 Karen Carney 2005–201914432 [47]
3 Jill Scott 2006–14324 [48]
4 Alex Scott 2004–201714012 [49]
5 Casey Stoney 2000–20181306 [50]

Bold names denote a player still playing or available for selection.

Top goalscorers

#NameEngland careerCapsGoalsAverageRef
1 Kelly Smith 1995–2015117460.39 [51]
2 Karen Walker 1988–200383400.48 [52]
Fara Williams 2001–172400.23 [46]
4 Hope Powell 1983–199866350.53 [53]
5 Ellen White 2010–88350.39 [54]

Bold names denote a player still playing or available for selection.

Captains

PlayerEngland career
Sheila Parker 1972–1976
Carol Thomas (née McCune)1976–1985
Debbie Bampton 1985–1991
Gillian Coultard 1991–1995
Debbie Bampton 1995–1997
Gillian Coultard 1997–2000
Mo Marley 2000–2001
Tara Proctor 2001
Karen Walker 2002
Faye White 2002–2012
Casey Stoney 2012–2014
Steph Houghton 2014–present

Recent schedule and results

All times are listed in GMT except where noted.

2018

2019

See also

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Germany national football team mens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany national football team is the men's football team that has represented Germany in international competition since 1908. It is governed by the German Football Association, founded in 1900. Ever since the DFB was reinaugurated in 1949 the team has represented the Federal Republic of Germany. Under Allied occupation and division, two other separate national teams were also recognised by FIFA: the Saarland team representing the Saarland (1950–1956) and the East German team representing the German Democratic Republic (1952–1990). Both have been absorbed along with their records by the current national team. The official name and code "Germany FR (FRG)" was shortened to "Germany (GER)" following the reunification in 1990.

The Wales national football team represents Wales in international football. It is controlled by the Football Association of Wales (FAW), the governing body for football in Wales and the third-oldest national football association in the world.

The Croatia national football team represents Croatia in international football matches. The team is controlled by the Croatian Football Federation (HNS), the governing body for football in Croatia. Football is widely supported throughout the country due to the ever-present popularity of the sport. Most home matches are played at the Stadion Maksimir in Zagreb, although other smaller venues are also used occasionally. They are one of the youngest national teams to reach the knockout stage of a major tournament, as well as the youngest team to occupy the top 10 in the FIFA World Rankings.

Czech Republic national football team mens national association football team representing the Czech Republic

The Czech national football team represents the Czech Republic in international football, and are controlled by the Football Association of the Czech Republic, the governing body for football in the Czech Republic. Historically, the team participated in FIFA and UEFA competitions as Bohemia, Austria-Hungary and Czechoslovakia, finishing second at the 1934 and 1962 World Cups and winning the European Championship in 1976.

France womens national football team womens national association football team representing France

The French women's national football team is directed by the French Football Federation (FFF). The team competes as a member of UEFA in various international football tournaments such as the FIFA Women's World Cup, UEFA Women's Euro, the Summer Olympics, and the Algarve Cup.

Italy womens national football team womens national association football team representing Italy

The Italy women's national football team has represented Italy in international women's football since their inception in 1968. The team is controlled by the Italian Football Federation (FIGC), the governing body for football in Italy.

Karen Carney English association football player

Karen Julia Carney is an English former professional footballer who played as a winger for Chelsea and the England national team. Since making her senior international debut in 2005, Carney became the second most capped England player, making 144 appearances, including at the 2005, 2009, 2013 and 2017 European Championships and the World Cup in 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. She also competed for the Great Britain team at the 2012 Summer Olympics.

Eniola Aluko English association football player

Eniola Aluko is an English footballer who plays as a forward for Serie A club Juventus. Since 2014 she has also provided television commentary on football, including men’s and women’s World Cups.

Fara Williams English association football player

Fara Tanya Franki Merrett MBE, known as Fara Williams, is an English footballer who plays as a central midfielder for Reading and the England national team. A consistent goalscorer and set-piece specialist, Williams is considered one of England's leading players. Since making her senior debut in 2002, Williams has accrued 170 caps for the England Womens Team, making her their highest capped player. She played at the 2005, 2009, 2013 and 2017 European Championships, as well as the World Cups in 2007, 2011 and 2015. Williams also featured for Team GB at the 2012 London Olympics.

Jill Scott (footballer) English association football player

Jill Louise Scott is an English footballer who plays as a midfielder for Manchester City and the England national team. The FIFA technical report into the 2011 Women's World Cup described Scott as one of England's four outstanding players; "[an] energetic, ball-winning midfielder who organises the team well, works hard at both ends of the pitch and can change her team's angle of attack."

Karen Bardsley association football player

Karen Louise Bardsley is a footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for Manchester City and the England national team.

Great Britain Olympic football team national association football team

The Great Britain Olympic football team is the men's football team that represents the United Kingdom at the Summer Olympic Games. The team is organised by the English Football Association (FA) as the footballing representative of the British Olympic Association. The team only competes in the Olympic Games. In other international football tournaments, the Home Nations of the United Kingdom are represented by their own national teams, a situation which pre-dated the establishment of a GB team.

Ellen White (footballer) English association football player

Ellen Toni White is an English international footballer who plays as a forward for Manchester City and the England national team. With England, she has played at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup, the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup and the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, reaching the semi-finals in the latter two tournaments. She was also part of the Great Britain team for the 2012 Summer Olympics.

Great Britain womens Olympic football team womens Olympic association football team representing the UK

The Great Britain women's Olympic football team represents the United Kingdom in the women's football tournament at the Olympic Games. Normally, no team represents the whole of the United Kingdom in women's football, as separate teams compete for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in the World Cup and the European Championship.

Demi Stokes English footballer

Demi Lee Courtney Stokes is an English footballer who plays for Manchester City. She previously played for Sunderland in the English FA Women's Premier League. Stokes made her debut for the senior England women's national football team in January 2014.

Alex Greenwood English association football player

Alex Greenwood is an English footballer who plays for Olympique Lyonnais in the French Division 1 Féminine and the England national team. Mainly a left-back, she can also play as a centre-back and is considered to be a set-piece specialist.

Fran Kirby English association football player

Francesca Kirby is an English professional footballer who plays as a forward for Chelsea and the England national team. She began her career with her local team Reading before moving to Chelsea in July 2015. In August 2014, Kirby won her first senior cap for England. She represented her country at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada, the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France, and at the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 in the Netherlands.

Nikita Parris English professional footballer

Nikita Josephine Parris is an English professional footballer who plays as a forward for Olympique Lyonnais and the England national team.

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