Orlando Pride

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Orlando Pride
OrlandoPride.png
Full nameOrlando Pride
FoundedOctober 20, 2015;3 years ago (2015-10-20)
Stadium Orlando City Stadium
Orlando, Florida
Capacity25,500
OwnerFlávio Augusto da Silva (majority)
Phil Rawlins (minority)
Head Coach Marc Skinner
League National Women's Soccer League
2018 7th
Website Club website
Soccerball current event.svg Current season

The Orlando Pride is a professional women's soccer team based in Orlando, Florida. The team joined the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL), the top level of women's soccer in the U.S., for the 2016 season. [1] [2] The tenth team to be added to the league, they are affiliated with the men's team Orlando City SC in Major League Soccer. [3] They play their home games at Orlando City Stadium.

Orlando, Florida City in Central Florida

Orlando is a city in the U.S. state of Florida and the county seat of Orange County. Located in Central Florida, it is the center of the Orlando metropolitan area, which had a population of 2,509,831, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released in July 2017. These figures make it the 23rd-largest metropolitan area in the United States, the sixth-largest metropolitan area in the Southern United States, and the third-largest metropolitan area in Florida. As of 2015, Orlando had an estimated city-proper population of 280,257, making it the 73rd-largest city in the United States, the fourth-largest city in Florida, and the state's largest inland city.

National Womens Soccer League professional soccer league, highest level of womens soccer in the United States

The National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) is a professional women's soccer league, run by the United States Soccer Federation. At the top of the United States league system, it represents the sport's highest level in the United States. The NWSL was established in 2012 as a successor to Women's Professional Soccer (2007–2012), which was itself the successor to Women's United Soccer Association (2001–2003). The league began play in 2013 with eight teams, four of which were former members of Women's Professional Soccer. With the addition of two expansion teams in Houston and Orlando and the loss of Boston Breakers, it now has nine teams throughout the United States.

The 2016 National Women's Soccer League season is the fourth season of the National Women's Soccer League, the top division of women's soccer in the United States. Including the NWSL's two professional predecessors, Women's Professional Soccer (2009–2011) and the Women's United Soccer Association (2001–2003), it is the tenth overall season of FIFA and USSF-sanctioned top division women's soccer in the United States. The league is operated by the United States Soccer Federation and receives major financial backing from that body. Further financial backing is expected to be provided by the Canadian Soccer Association. Both national federations pay the league salaries of many of their respective national team members in an effort to nurture talent in those nations.

Contents

The Pride hold the record for hosting the largest attendance in NWSL history, with 23,403 on hand to witness the Pride's inaugural home game, a 3–1 victory over the Houston Dash on April 23, 2016. [4]

Houston Dash professional womens soccer team based in Houston, Texas

The Houston Dash is a professional women's soccer team based in Houston, Texas. They joined the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) in the 2014 season.

A NWSL record crowd of 23,403 at the Florida Citrus Bowl on April 23, 2016 of the franchise's first Home Game. Orlando Pride Home Opener.jpg
A NWSL record crowd of 23,403 at the Florida Citrus Bowl on April 23, 2016 of the franchise's first Home Game.

History

Following the 2015 NWSL season, it was rumored that the Orlando City SC ownership group would be adding an expansion team to the women's professional league. [5] On October 20, 2015, a press conference was held at Lake Eola Park where Phil Rawlins unveiled the team name, logo, and colors. [6] Former head coach of the Australia and U.S. national teams Tom Sermanni was announced as head coach. [7]

The 2015 National Women's Soccer League season was the third season of the National Women's Soccer League, the top division of women's soccer in the United States. Including the NWSL's two professional predecessors, Women's Professional Soccer (2009–2011) and the Women's United Soccer Association (2001–2003), it was the ninth overall season of FIFA and USSF-sanctioned top division women's soccer in the United States. The league is operated by the United States Soccer Federation and receives major financial backing from that body. Further financial backing is expected to be provided by the Canadian Soccer Association and the Mexican Football Federation. All three national federations pay the league salaries of many of their respective national team members in an effort to nurture talent in those nations.

Orlando City SC American association football club

Orlando City Soccer Club is an American professional soccer club in Orlando, Florida, that competes as a member of the Eastern Conference in Major League Soccer (MLS). Orlando City SC began play in 2015 as an expansion team and is the first MLS franchise in the state since Miami Fusion and Tampa Bay Mutiny folded following the 2001 season. The team plays at Orlando City Stadium in downtown Orlando.

Lake Eola Park lake of the United States of America

Lake Eola Park is a public park located in Downtown Orlando, Florida. Lake Eola is the main feature of the park. Also located in the park is the Walt Disney Amphitheater, which hosts many community events and various performances year round. On the east side of the park is a Chinese pagoda, and a playground. The park is surrounded by four streets: East Robinson Street, Rosalind Avenue, East Central Boulevard, and North Eola Drive.

On October 26, 2015, the Pride announced that they had made the first player acquisitions in team history; they acquired forward Alex Morgan and Kaylyn Kyle from Portland Thorns FC in exchange for the Pride's No. 1 picks in the 2015 NWSL Expansion Draft and the 2016 NWSL College Draft as well as an international roster spot for the 2016 and 2017 seasons, and also acquired Sarah Hagen from FC Kansas City and Kansas City's second-round College Draft pick in exchange for the Pride's 2017 second-round College Draft pick. [8] They finished the season in 9th.

Alex Morgan American association football player

Alexandra Patricia Morgan Carrasco is an American soccer player, Olympic gold medalist, and FIFA Women's World Cup champion. She is a forward for Orlando Pride in the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) and the United States national team. Since 2018, she co-captains her national team alongside Carli Lloyd and Megan Rapinoe.

Kaylyn Kyle Association footballer

Kaylyn McKenzie Kyle is a Canadian soccer player who last played as a midfielder for the Orlando Pride in the National Women's Soccer League. She is also a member of Canada women's national soccer team, winning a bronze medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics, and is a Right To Play ambassador.

Portland Thorns FC soccer team and National Womens Soccer League franchise in Portland, Oregon, USA

The Portland Thorns FC is an American professional women's soccer team based in Portland, Oregon. Established in 2012, the team began play in 2013 in the then-eight-team National Women's Soccer League (NWSL), which receives support from the United States Soccer Federation (USSF), the Canadian Soccer Association (CSA), and formerly the Mexican Football Federation (FMF). The Portland franchise is owned by Peregrine Sports LLC, which also owns the Portland Timbers. The Thorns, the Houston Dash, the Orlando Pride, and the Utah Royals are other NWSL teams with Major League Soccer affiliations.

In 2017 the Pride qualified for the playoffs for the first time in franchise history as they finished the regular season in 3rd place with a record of 11-7-6. They went to Portland Thorns for the semi-final but lost 4-1.

The 2017 season is Orlando Pride's second season. The team competes in the National Women's Soccer League, the top division of women's soccer in the United States.

Following a disappointing 2018 season where the Pride finished in 7th place, head coach Tom Sermanni and the Orlando Pride mutually parted ways after three seasons. Sermanni had a record of 24-29-14 during his spell in Orlando. [9]

The 2018 season is Orlando Pride's third season in the National Women's Soccer League, the top division of women's soccer in the United States. The team plays its home games at Orlando City Stadium.

Tom Sermanni Association football player and coach

Thomas Dorby Sermanni is a Scottish football coach and former professional player and current head coach of the New Zealand women's national team. He has previously coached the Australia women's national team, the United States women's national team from 2013 to 2014, and the Orlando Pride of the National Women's Soccer League from 2016 to 2018.

In January 2019, Marc Skinner stepped down from his role at FA WSL side Birmingham City to become the Pride's second ever head coach.

Team name, crest and colors

The name Orlando Pride was announced on October 20, 2015 by founder and president Phil Rawlins. He noted that the name "captures how we all feel about the City of Orlando, as well as firmly tying into the Lions family." [6] The team colors are purple and light blue. The logo features an illustration of the famous fountain at Lake Eola Park. [10] [11]

Stadium

The team currently plays at Orlando City Stadium Open House Event (32264010504).jpg
The team currently plays at Orlando City Stadium

The team plays its home games in Orlando City Stadium, in Orlando, Florida, which opened for the 2017 NWSL season. The stadium has a 25,500 capacity including a safe standing section.

Prior to this the team played the 2016 season at Camping World Stadium (formerly Orlando Stadium, Tangerine Bowl, Florida Citrus Bowl and Orlando Citrus Bowl) which has a seating capacity of 60,219. In April 2016, Orlando Pride set a new NWSL attendance record of 23,403.

Current roster

Orlando Pride in May 2018 Orlando Pride (40508621780).jpg
Orlando Pride in May 2018
As of March 4, 2019. [12]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.PositionPlayerNation
2 Forward Sydney Leroux Flag of the United States.svg  United States
3 Defender Toni Pressley Flag of the United States.svg  United States
4 Defender Shelina Zadorsky Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
5 Midfielder Emily van Egmond Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
6 Forward Chioma Ubogagu Flag of England.svg  England
8 Forward Danica Evans Flag of the United States.svg  United States
9 Forward Camila Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
10 Forward Marta Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
11 Defender Ali Krieger Flag of the United States.svg  United States
12 Midfielder Kristen Edmonds Flag of the United States.svg  United States
13 Forward Alex Morgan Flag of the United States.svg  United States
14 Defender Alanna Kennedy Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
15 Forward Rachel Hill Flag of the United States.svg  United States
16 Defender Carson Pickett Flag of the United States.svg  United States
17 Midfielder Dani Weatherholt Flag of the United States.svg  United States
24 Goalkeeper Ashlyn Harris (captain)Flag of the United States.svg  United States
28 Goalkeeper Haley Kopmeyer Flag of the United States.svg  United States

Staff

As of February 27, 2019 [13] [14]
Executive
Majority owner and chairman Flag of Brazil.svg Flávio Augusto da Silva
Minor owner/life president Flag of England.svg Phil Rawlins
Owner Flag of England.svg John Bonner
Chief executive officer Flag of Brazil.svg Alex Leitão
General manager Flag of Guam.svg Erik Ustruck
Coaching staff
Head coach Flag of England.svg Marc Skinner
Assistant coach Flag of England.svg Carl Green
Goalkeeping coach Flag of England.svg Lloyd Yaxley

Records

Year-by-year

SeasonNWSL regular seasonPosition NWSL
Playoffs
Avg. Attendance
PWLDGFGAPts
2016 2061312030199thDid not qualify8,785
2017 2411674531403rd Semi-finals 6,186
2018 2481063036307thDid not qualify4,837

Head coaches

As of January 14, 2019. NWSL Regular season & playoff matches are counted.

CoachNationalityStartEndGamesWinLossDrawWin %
Tom Sermanni Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland October 20, 2015September 14, 201869253014036.23
Marc Skinner Flag of England.svg  England January 14, 2019present0000!

All-time goalscorers

As of September 8, 2018 [15]

No.NameActive yearsAppearancesNWSL goals
1 Flag of the United States.svg Alex Morgan 2016–present4718
2 Flag of Brazil.svg Marta 2017–present4117
3 Flag of the United States.svg Kristen Edmonds 2016–present579
4 Flag of England.svg Chioma Ubogagu 2017–present418
5 Flag of the United States.svg Rachel Hill 2017–present367
5 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Alanna Kennedy 2017–present457
5 Flag of the United States.svg Jasmyne Spencer 2016–2017417
8 Flag of the United States.svg Sydney Leroux 2018–present206
9 Flag of Brazil.svg Camila 2017–present334
10 Flag of the United States.svg Dani Weatherholt 2016–present553
11 Flag of the United States.svg Sarah Hagen 2016–2017172
11 Flag of the United States.svg Toni Pressley 2016–present442
11 Flag of England.svg Lianne Sanderson 201682
14 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Steph Catley 2016–2017351
14 Flag of the United States.svg Danica Evans 2017–present171
14 Flag of the United States.svg Christine Nairn 2018201

Note:

Bold signifies current Orlando Pride player.

Only goals in competitive matches are counted.

Broadcasting

As of 2017, Orlando Pride games are streamed exclusively by Go90 for American audiences and via the NWSL website for international viewers. [16] As part of a three-year agreement with A&E Networks, Lifetime broadcasts one NWSL Game of the Week on Saturday afternoons. [17] [18] The Pride will be featured in the nationally-televised Game of the Week on April 15, [19] April 22, [20] June 24, July 22, August 12, September 2, and September 9, 2017. [21]

In 2016, games were broadcast locally on the Bright House Sports Network. [22] In April of the same year, a livestream of a Pride match simulcast on the Facebook page of Alex Morgan had a live broadcast audience of 489,999 during the first half. [23] It was the first professional sports broadcast on the social networking website. [24]

See also

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NWSL expansion

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Dani Weatherholt association football player

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The 2019 National Women's Soccer League season is the seventh season of the National Women's Soccer League, the top division of women's soccer in the United States. Including the NWSL's two professional predecessors, Women's Professional Soccer (2009–2011) and the Women's United Soccer Association (2001–2003), it is the thirteenth overall season of FIFA and USSF-sanctioned top division women's soccer in the United States.

The 2019 season is Orlando Pride's fourth season in the National Women's Soccer League, the top division of women's soccer in the United States. The team plays its home games at Orlando City Stadium. Following the departure of Tom Sermanni at the end of the 2018 season, Marc Skinner was announced as his replacement in January.

References

  1. Tenorio, Paul (October 20, 2015). "Orlando City set to announce National Women's Soccer League franchise". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  2. Murray, Caitlin (September 14, 2015). "MLS's Orlando City set to expand into NWSL for 2016". The Guardian. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  3. Kassouf, Jeff (October 20, 2015). "Orlando Pride named 10th NWSL team for 2016". The Equalizer. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  4. "Orlando Pride rolls to 3–1 win before record crowd in home debut". OrlandoSentinel.com. Retrieved 2016-04-23.
  5. "Report: Orlando City SC to announce NWSL expansion". Sports Illustrated. September 14, 2015. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  6. 1 2 "Orlando Pride women's soccer team to join NWSL in 2016". Bay News 9. Archived from the original on October 25, 2015. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  7. Wahl, Grant (October 20, 2015). "Former USWNT manager Sermanni to coach new Orlando team in NWSL". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  8. "Orlando Pride Acquires Alex Morgan, Kaylyn Kyle and Sarah Hagen". Orlando Pride. October 26, 2015. Retrieved October 26, 2015.
  9. "Orlando Pride and Head Coach Tom Sermanni Mutually Part Ways". September 14, 2018. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  10. Etzler, Allen (October 20, 2015). "Orlando City Officially Awarded NWSL Expansion Team, Names Club Orlando Pride". The Mane Land. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  11. Rothschild, Ty (October 20, 2015). "Behind The Scenes: Creating The Orlando Pride Logo" . Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  12. "Orlando Pride Announces 2019 Preseason Roster". Orlando City SC. 4 March 2019. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  13. "Orlando Pride Staff". Orlando Pride.
  14. "Board of Directors". Orlando City SC.
  15. Ltd, Simplestream. "National Women's Soccer League". www.nwslsoccer.com.
  16. "NWSL, go90 announce exclusive streaming partnership". Black and Red United (SBNation). Vox Media. Retrieved April 14, 2017.
  17. "Lifetime To Air National Women's Soccer League Games As A+E Networks Kicks in For Equity Stake". Deadline.com. Retrieved February 3, 2017.
  18. "A+E Networks, National Women's Soccer League Ink Major Deal". Variety. Retrieved February 3, 2017.
  19. "S2017 E1 Portland Thorns FC vs. Orlando Pride". Lifetime. April 15, 2017. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  20. "S2017 E2 Orlando Pride vs. Washington Spirit". Lifetime. April 22, 2017. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  21. Forrester, Nick (March 30, 2017). "NWSL announces 2017 broadcast schedule on Lifetime". Excelle Sports. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  22. "Bright House will broadcast four upcoming Orlando Pride soccer matches". Orlando Weekly. June 23, 2016. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  23. "Alex Morgan Broadcast Her Team's Last Game Via Facebook Live". Sport Techie. April 26, 2016. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  24. Kantrowitz, Alex (April 27, 2016). "Facebook Quietly Live-Streamed Its First Professional Sports Broadcast Over The Weekend". Buzzfeed. Retrieved April 26, 2017.