Fire and Rescue NSW

Last updated
Fire and Rescue NSW
Fire and Rescue NSW logo.svg
Flag of Fire and Rescue New South Wales.svg
Orta Recens Quam Pura Nites
(Newly Risen, How Brightly We Shine)
Operational area
Country Australia
State New South Wales
Address1 Amarina Ave, Greenacre, New South Wales, Australia
Agency overview
Established14 February 1884
Annual calls165,350 (2015-16)
Employees
  • 3,534 Permanent (Full-time) Firefighters
  • 3,293 Retained (Part-time) Firefighters
  • 5,782 Community Fire Unit Volunteers
Staffing465 Administrative and Trades Staff
Commissioner Paul Baxter QSO
Facilities and equipment
Stations 335
Engines 422
Ladders 2
Rescues 11
HAZMAT 18
USAR 3
Aerial Pumpers 13
Aerial Ladder Platforms 13
Website
Official website

Fire and Rescue NSW (previously known as New South Wales Fire Brigades), an agency of the Government of New South Wales, Australia, is responsible for firefighting, rescue and hazmat services in the major cities, metropolitan areas and towns across rural and regional New South Wales. Fire and Rescue NSW is the forth largest urban fire service in the world, with over 6,800 firefighters serving at 335 fire stations throughout the state, supported by 465 administrative and trades staff and 5,700 community fire unit volunteers. [1] FRNSW are also the busiest fire service in Australia, attending over 124,000 incidents a year and undertaking 52,000 community activities in 2017/18. [2]

A government or state agency, sometimes an appointed commission, is a permanent or semi-permanent organization in the machinery of government that is responsible for the oversight and administration of specific functions, such as an intelligence agency. There is a notable variety of agency types. Although usage differs, a government agency is normally distinct both from a department or ministry, and other types of public body established by government. The functions of an agency are normally executive in character, since different types of organizations are most often constituted in an advisory role—this distinction is often blurred in practice however.

Government of New South Wales state government of New South Wales, Australia

The Government of New South Wales, also referred to as the New South Wales Government, NSW Government or Her Majesty’s Government, is the Australian state democratic administrative authority of New South Wales. It is currently held by a coalition of the Liberal Party and the National Party. The Government of New South Wales, a parliamentary constitutional monarchy, was formed in 1856 as prescribed in its Constitution, as amended from time to time. Since the Federation of Australia in 1901, New South Wales has been a state of the Commonwealth of Australia, and the Constitution of Australia regulates its relationship with the Commonwealth. Under the Australian Constitution, New South Wales ceded legislative and judicial supremacy to the Commonwealth, but retained powers in all matters not in conflict with the Commonwealth.

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide.

Contents

FRNSW also works closely with the NSW Rural Fire Service in regional areas, along with other agencies including the NSW State Emergency Service, NSW Parks and Wildlife Service and the NSW Forestry Corporation.

New South Wales State Emergency Service

The New South Wales State Emergency Service, an agency of the Government of New South Wales, is an emergency and rescue service dedicated to assisting the community in times of natural and man-made disasters. The NSW SES is made up almost entirely of volunteer members, numbering over 9,000 as of June 2018. Members are easily identified by their distinctive orange overalls.

National Parks and Wildlife Service (New South Wales) part of the Office of Environment and Heritage (New South Wales) - the main government conservation agency in New South Wales, Australia

The National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) was a part of the Office of Environment and Heritage - formerly the main government conservation agency in New South Wales, Australia. It is currently part of the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment.

The agency operates under the Fire Brigades Act 1989, [3] with a substantial history dating back well over 100 years to the establishment of the New South Wales Fire Brigades in 1910, and the Metropolitan Fire Brigade prior to that in 1884. [4]

The agency is led by the Commissioner of Fire and Rescue NSW, currently Paul Baxter QSO, who reports to the Minister for Emergency Services. The minister is ultimately responsible to the Parliament of New South Wales.

Minister for Police and Emergency Services (New South Wales) cabinet position in New South Wales

The New South Wales Minister for Police and Emergency Services are minister in the Government of New South Wales who have responsibilities which includes conduct and regulation of all police and services agencies and personnel and also deals with operational and event planning issues, and for fire and rescue services in New South Wales, Australia.

Parliament of New South Wales legislative body in the Australian state of New South Wales

The Parliament of New South Wales is a bicameral legislature in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW), consisting of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, and the New South Wales Legislative Council. Each house is directly elected by the people of New South Wales at elections held approximately every four years. The Parliament derives its authority from the Queen of Australia, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, represented by the Governor of New South Wales, who chairs the Executive Council of New South Wales. The parliament shares law making powers with the Australian Federal Parliament. The New South Wales Parliament follows the Westminster parliamentary traditions of dress, Green–Red chamber colours and protocol.

History

Fire and Rescue NSW in action. Paddington/Sydney, July 2012 NSW Fire Brigade Paddington 2012.jpg
Fire and Rescue NSW in action. Paddington/Sydney, July 2012

Early firefighting in New South Wales was made up of a number of small insurance and volunteer based fire brigades located predominantly around central Sydney. Following a series of major fires, most notably the Garden Palace Fire in 1882, firefighting in Sydney was formalised into one organisation on February 14, 1884, resulting in the formation of the Metropolitan Fire Brigade (MFB). [4] The MFB initially operating out of the former Insurance Brigade Headquarters on Bathurst Street but soon began to seek new locations for expansion. The first station opened by the MFB was No. 3 Stanmore (initially known as Marrickville) in 1886. This was soon followed by the construction of their new Headquarters on Castlereagh Street (No. 1 Station) in 1888, which remains New South Wales' oldest operational fire station to this day. [5]

In 1910, the Fire Brigades Act was extended to cover not just Sydney but the entire state of New South Wales. The former Metropolitan Fire Brigade as a result became the New South Wales Fire Brigades (NSWFB). [5] The organisation continued to grow, with many towns across the state seeking to establish permanent fire services, often after major fires of their own. The NSWFB's expansion continued through the early 20th Century to become responsible for hundreds of stations and thousands of firefighters, even after significant post war cuts in 1945. Through the mid to late 20th Century, NSWFB firefighters faced some of the most dangerous and deadly emergencies in the states history, including the 1979 Luna Park Ghost Train Fire, the 1977 Granville Rail Disaster, the 1981 Sylvania Heights Nursing Home Fire, the 1981 Rembrandt Hostel Fire, the 1989 Downunder Hostel Fire and the 1989 Newcastle Earthquake, along with countless major bushfire emergencies including the 1968, 1974/75, 1979 and 1980 bush fire seasons.

The Sydney Ghost Train fire was a fire on the night of 9 June 1979 at Luna Park Sydney. The fire killed six children and one adult, and destroyed the amusement park's ghost train. Inadequate fire-fighting measures and low staffing caused the fire to completely destroy the ride, which was first constructed in 1931, and had been transported from Glenelg, South Australia to Milsons Point, New South Wales during 1934 and 1935.

Granville rail disaster train wreck

The Granville rail/train disaster occurred on Tuesday 18 January 1977 at Granville, New South Wales, a western suburb of Sydney when a crowded commuter train derailed, running into the supports of a road bridge that collapsed onto two of the train's passenger carriages. It remains the worst rail disaster in Australian history and the greatest loss of life in a confined area post war: 84 people died, more than 213 were injured, and 1,300 were affected.

1989 Newcastle earthquake December 1989 earthquake in New South Wales, Australia

The 1989 Newcastle earthquake occurred in Newcastle, New South Wales on Thursday, 28 December. The shock measured 5.6 on the Richter magnitude scale and was one of Australia's most serious natural disasters, killing 13 people and injuring more than 160. The damage bill has been estimated at A$4 billion, including an insured loss of about $1 billion.

The 1990s and early 2000s saw significant changes in the NSWFB and in firefighting as a whole. Development in training and equipment saw the more widespread use of Breathing Apparatus and Thermal Imaging Cameras, along with improved Personal Protective Equipment and more modern appliances. In 1991, NSWFB took over primary rescue response from the NSW Police in a number of areas in Sydney. [6] This saw a shift in the brigade, as they began to increase their capabilities in general and specialist rescue. This period also saw a number of major emergencies across the state, including the 1991 Palm Grove Hostel Fire, the 1994 Bushfires, the 1995 Speed Street Fire, the 1997 Thredbo Landslide, the 1997 Bushfires, the 1999 Glenbrook Train Derailment, the 1999 Sydney Hailstorm, the 2001 Bushfires, the 2002/03 Bushfires, the 2003 Waterfall Train Derailment and the 2006 Bushfires. [7]

Since the late 2000s, the brigade have been working to modernise themselves as a world class fire service. In 2011, the New South Wales Fire Brigades became Fire and Rescue NSW (FRNSW), [8] to better emphasise their growing role in rescue (Following the brigade taking over primary rescue from the NSW Ambulance in Sydney, Newcastle and Wollongong in 2011). [9] FRNSW have also been focused on further developing their Personal Protective Equipment. In 2013, firefighters received new Personal Protective Clothing, featuring a Nomex and Kevlar blend called Titan, combined with an inner moisture barrier to prevent steam burns. [10] This was followed by the roll out of new MSA and Pac Fire Firefighting and General Purpose Helmets and in 2015, new MSA Breathing Apparatus sets in 2017 and new flash hoods and firefighting gloves in 2018. [11] [12] In 2016, FRNSW rolled out Mobile Data Terminals to every station, which are portable tablets that allow firefighters to access live resources, call details, advanced maps, weather radars, data sheets and much more. [13]

FRNSW have been working to incorporate further new technologies into their fleet, including the development of their two high tech Mobile Command Centres, [14] the incorporation of Compressed Air Foam Systems into their appliances, [15] the development of a remote Turbine Assisted Firefighting Unit, [16] the development of the Hytrans Bulk Water Transfer System [17] and the development of their Remote Piloted Aircraft (Drone) System. [18] In 2016, FRNSW relocated their Headquarters to a brand new building at Greenacre, which serves as a modern work space for both operational and administrative staff. [19] This was followed in 2018 by the construction of the new Emergency Services Academy at Orchard Hills, which provides firefighters with a modern practical learning environment, aiming to maintain and improve firefighter safety and skills. [20] In 2018, Fire and Rescue NSW also rolled out the ‘Plus Plan’, an organisational strategy to develop an internal model for success and community education, with an emphasis on their new roles and technologies.

Emblem

The Fire and Rescue NSW emblem includes the NSW state emblem with the State motto Orta Recens Quam Pura Nites, which is Latin for 'Newly Risen How Brightly We Shine'.

A flag based on the British Blue Ensign with FRNSW emblem is also used.

Commissioner

The Commissioner's official vehicle bears New South Wales number plate 10, which has been on continuous issue to the head of the fire department in NSW from the Roads and Maritime Services since 1910. [21] [22]

Paul Baxter QSO was appointed Commissioner of Fire & Rescue NSW on 16 January 2017. He was previously National Commander of the New Zealand Fire Service and the National Rural Fire Authority. [23]

NameTitleTerm startTerm endTime in officeNotes
Vice Admiral Ian MacDougall AC AFSM Commissioner10 June 19944 July 20039 years, 24 days [24]
Greg Mullins AO AFSM 4 July 20036 January 201713 years, 186 days [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30]
Paul Baxter QSO 16 January 2017Incumbent2 years, 195 days [31] [32]

Organisation

Staffing

Fire and Rescue NSW operate two levels of staffing, Permanent and Retained. Permanent Firefighters are full-time career crews who work predominately 24 hour shifts. Each permanent station is made up of four platoons, A B C & D. Each station is assigned a minimum of one Pumper with a crew of 3 firefighters and a station officer per shift. Some multi appliance stations such as City of Sydney can have as many as 20 firefighters on a platoon. Permanent stations are typically located in Metropolitan areas (Such as Sydney and Newcastle) and Regional centres (Such as Lismore and Dubbo). [33]

Retained Firefighters are part-time on call crews, who are notified by pager and travel to the fire station from home or work when an emergency occurs. Retained firefighters are predominantly located in outer Metropolitan and Regional areas. Retained firefighters operate off an availability roster, where each firefighter has to give their available hours for the day/week. This system ensures that there is always a minimum safe crew of four Retained Firefighters available to turnout at any given time. A number of stations, particularly in regional areas, have a mix of both Permanent and Retained crews, who work together and often provide backup for one another. [34]

Zones

Stations in New South Wales are organised geographically (often by LGA) into zones which are spread around the state. Each zone consists of between 10 and 20 stations. Each platoon of each zone is run by a Duty Commander, who not only manages the platoon but responds operationally as a commander to emergencies within the zone. Each zone then has an overall Zone Commander, who manages on a zone based level. Three zones then make up an Area, which is managed by an Area Commander. In New South Wales there are 21 Zones which form 7 Areas. [35]

The 7 Areas are split between Metropolitan and Regional. The Metro Areas report to the Assistant Commissioner of Metropolitan Operations, whilst the Regional Areas report to the Assistant Commissioner of Regional Operations. Both of these officers then report to the Deputy Commissioner of Field Operations, who in turn reports to the Commissioner. This tiered system means that management can be tailored at each level to suit local operational needs. [35]

Specialist Sections

Fire and Rescue NSW operate a number of specialist operational and support sections including;

Operational Communications - Responsible for Triple Zero call taking, dispatch and emergency communications, operating out of two Communications Centres at Alexandria and Newcastle. [36]

Fire Investigation and Research - Responsible for investigating the cause and origin of fires (including the operation of Australia's first accelerant detection dogs), as well as research into fire behaviour and fire dynamics, who operate out of their base at Greenacre and their research centre at Londonderry. [37] [38]

Community and Fire Safety - Responsible for increasing community and business resilience to emergencies through effective community education as well as in the field assessments and inspections. [39]

Education and Training - Responsible for providing high quality education and training for firefighters, improving skills and increasing safety, utilising the Emergency Services Academy at Orchard Hills. [40]

Capability Management - Responsible for developing and enhancing Fire and Rescue's operational capabilities, including Firefighting, Rescue, HazMat, Incident Management and others. Development of these capabilities are what keeps FRNSW a leading world class fire service.

Specialised Operations - Responsible for managing Fire and Rescue's highly specialised Rescue, USAR, HazMat, Bushfire and Aviation Sections. They run from a number of locations, mainly the Specialised Operations Centre at the Orchard Hills Academy. [41]

Logistics - Responsible for maintaining the organisations huge logistics demand, including equipment management and distribution, and the management and maintenance of Fire and Rescue's huge vehicle fleet and property infrastructure. [42]

FRNSW operate a number of other specialist support sections include Finance, Governance and Legal, Information and Technology, People and Culture along with many others who support frontline firefighters and operations. [1] [35] [43]

Community Fire Units

Community fire units (CFUs) are volunteer teams of local residents trained to safeguard their homes during a bushfire, until the fire brigades can get there, or to 'mop up' after a fire has passed so fire units can be released to attend more urgent incidents. CFU members are not firefighters. [44] The aim of the CFU program is to reduce the impact of bushfires on the community and to protect life and property from bushfires. A typical team is made up of six to 12 members. Recruitment is within the local community. Local fire stations conduct regular training sessions with volunteers. The training focus is on bushfire education, prevention and preparation.

Operations

Responding from 355 Fire Stations across the state, Fire and Rescue NSW protect over 7 million people across New South Wales (over 90% of the state) from fires and emergencies and attend over 124,000 calls a year. [1] [2]

Fire

The majority of Fire and Rescue NSW's workload comes from fires, with the brigade responding to over 68,000 fire related calls in the 2017/18 period. These included over 6,000 structure fires, ranging from house fires to high rise fires and everything in between. Fire Rescue NSW's busiest station for fires is Ropes Crossing, who attend over 650 confirmed fires a year. FRNSW maintain a strong percentage of having 78% of structure fires contained to the room of origin, which can be attributed to the tenacity and hard work of firefighters, combined with the strong work of Fire Safety and Community Education. [2] FRNSW attend an average of about 350 'Greater Alarm' fires a year, which are fires that require the attendance of four or more stations. The largest attendance at a structure fire in 2018 was a 9th Alarm Factory Fire in Seven Hills, which required more than 25 stations to get under control. [45]

FRNSW also responded to close to 9,000 bushfires in 2017/18, including a number of major wild fires that destroyed thousands hectares of bushland along with hundreds of houses. FRNSW operate a dedicated Bushfire and Aviation Section, based at Sydney Olympic Park, which is co-located with the NSW Rural Fire Service Headquarters. [2] FRNSW work closely with the NSW Rural Fire Service along with other agencies including the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service and the NSW Forestry Corporation. Together, all four agencies come together to protect the state from bush and grass fires across all jurisdictions. In April 2018, over 70 FRNSW stations along with the RFS and NPWS attended a 17th Alarm Bush Fire which threatened hundreds of houses in Wattle Grove, Holsworthy, Menai and Alfords Point. Together, firefighters worked to prevent a single property loss as a result of the fire. [46]

Rescue

HAZMAT and Rescue vehicles Turvey Park Fire Station 1.jpg
HAZMAT and Rescue vehicles

As the largest rescue provider in the state, Fire and Rescue NSW responded to over 12,000 rescue's in 2017/18. [2] Fire and Rescue NSW are equipped to deal with all varieties of rescue incidents, including Domestic, Industrial, Road Crash, Transport, Confined Space, Vertical, Heavy Vehicle, Alpine, Trench, Bariatric, Swift Water, Large Animal and Collapse rescues. [47] Along with standard ‘Primary’ and ‘Secondary’ rescue units, Fire and Rescue NSW operate 7 Heavy Rescues and 4 Technical Rescues across the state, which carry an extensive array of heavy and technical rescue equipment. [48]

Fire and Rescue NSW also operate one of Australia's two Urban Search and Rescue Task Forces (NSWTF1 / AUS-2), who are accredited as a Heavy USAR Team by the United Nations INSARG. The Team are based out of Sydney, with a number of operators and vehicles across the state capable of providing both a domestic and international capability. [49] In 2011, Fire and Rescue NSW deployed the Team in a Heavy capacity twice to both the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake and the 2011 Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. [50] [51]

Hazardous Materials

Fire and Rescue NSW are the sole responsible agency for Hazardous Materials incidents in inland New South Wales. They attended over 16,000 hazardous conditions incidents in 2017/18, ranging from gas leaks to chemical spills. [2] Each station is equipped to deal with HazMat incidents to an extent, such as absorbing fuels, basic hydrocarbon booming, atmospheric monitoring and decontamination. Across the state, Fire and Rescue NSW operate 6 Heavy HazMats which are capable of dealing with more serious incidents, which are supported by 25 intermediate HazMat stations regionally.

Additional capability is provided by the HazMat Advisory Response Team (HART), who can deploy on a statewide basis with a range of highly specialised equipment such as Raman and Infra-red spectrometers. HART can also deploy the Otter II, their waterways response vessel, along with their mass decontamination units among other capabilities. Fire and Rescue NSW's Scientific Officers provide specialist scientific technical advise to crews statewide and can respond their mobile laboratory when required. [52]

Emergency Response

Fire and Rescue NSW are on hand 24/7 every day of the year available to assist the residents in New South Wales in their times of need. Fire and Rescue NSW work closely with the NSW State Emergency Service to respond to incidents during and following storm/weather events, such as chainsawing downed trees, tarping roofs and pumping out flooded areas. [53] This is in addition to Fire and Rescue NSW's flood/swift water rescue role. Another one of Fire and Rescue NSW's unique roles is their snake handling capability, with firefighters across the state trained in the safe capture and removal of snakes from peoples homes. [54] Rescuing children and pets locked in cars forms another serious part of Fire and Rescue NSW's role, particularly in hot Australian summers. [55]

In eleven remote/rural locations across the state, Fire and Rescue NSW are involved in the Community First Responder (CFR) program. [1] CFR involves firefighters responding to medical emergencies with NSW Ambulance, who are often located some distance away from the areas involved. Firefighters provide initial lifesaving patient care, who are supported by paramedics upon their arrival. [56] Stations across the state are regularly called upon to assist NSW Ambulance in a general capacity also, often simply providing manpower and specialist equipment when needed. These are just some of the diverse range of public calls for assistance that Fire and Rescue NSW attend every year. [2]

Fire engines (Appliances)

Red and yellow Sillitoe Tartan livery of FRNSW appliances Sillitoe-yellow-red.svg
Red and yellow Sillitoe Tartan livery of FRNSW appliances

All FRNSW appliances (fire engines) are custom designed. The specialised equipment to be carried on appliances is drawn from a standardised listing which forms a managed inventory and is specific to each appliance type and model. Standardisation of inventory is extremely important as this ensures equipment is stowed in an approved and ergonomic manner. It also ensures the appliance is not overloaded and is within its legal load carrying capacity.

Water Tankers

NSWRFS Isuzu tanker with similar design and body to FRNSW tankers NSW RFS Category 1 Grassland single cab heavy tanker from Lake Albert on Morgan Street part of the 2012 Pelly's Picnic Day in the Park street parade.jpg
NSWRFS Isuzu tanker with similar design and body to FRNSW tankers

FRNSW has a total of 150 4x4 Water Tanker appliances, in addition to 6 Bulk Tankers and 2 Bulk Water Semi Trailers: [57]

ClassChassis Make and ModelBody ManufacturerCommissionedNumberWater Tank Capacity
Tanker Class 1 (Isuzu)Isuzu FTS700Australian Fire Company1996 199734 Vehicles1800L 3000L
Tanker Class 1 (Isuzu)Isuzu FTS750Mills Tui2004 200633 Vehicles3000L
Tanker Class 1 (Isuzu)Isuzu FTS800Mills Tui2009 201124 Vehicles2200L 2700L
Tanker Class 1 (Isuzu)Isuzu FTS800Kuipers Engineering

(CAFS variants by Varley)

2014 201824 Vehicles3000L
Tanker Class 1 (Mercedes)Mercedes Atego 1626Varley Specialised Vehicles2014 201629 Vehicles2700L 3200L
Bulk Tanker Class 1 (Isuzu)Isuzu FVS1400Varley Specialised Vehicles2014 20166 Vehicles9000L
Light Tanker Class 1 (Mitsubishi)Mitsubishi CanterPhillips Engineering2007 20082 Vehicles1500L
Light Tanker Class 1 (Isuzu)Isuzu NPS64Westrucks20164 Vehicles1500L
Bulk Water TrailersHockney Engineering1987 19952 Vehicles28000L 33000L

Pumpers

FRNSW Scania Pumper NSWFB Scania Hornsby 050 - Flickr - Highway Patrol Images.jpg
FRNSW Scania Pumper

FRNSW has a total of 422 Pumpers.

Class

(Previous Class)

Chassis Make and ModelBody ManufacturerCommissionedNumberPump Capacity
Pumper Class 2 (Isuzu)

(Type 2 Pumper)

Isuzu FTR800Skilled Equipment Manufacturing1999 2007167 Vehicles3000LPM

@1000kPA

Pumper Class 2 (Isuzu)

(Type 2 Pumper)

Isuzu FTR900Skilled Equipment Manufacturing2009 201030 Vehicles3000LPM

@1000kPA

Pumper Class 2 (Mercedes)

(Type 2 Pumper)

Mercedes AtegoKuipers Engineering2014 201852 vehicles3000LPM

@1000kPA

Pumper Class 3 (Varley Commander)

(20 Type 4 and 11 Type 5 Pumpers)

VSV Commander Mk IVarley Specialised Vehicles2000 200231 Vehicles3500LPM 5300LPM

@1000kPA

Pumper Class 3 (Varley Commander)
(Type 3 Pumper)
VSV Commander Mk IIVarley Specialised Vehicles2002 200522 Vehicles3500LPM

@1000kPA

Pumper Class 3 (Scania)
(Type 4 Pumper)
Scania P94DAustralian Fire Company2001 200212 Vehicles3500LPM

@1000kPA

Pumper Class 3 (Scania)


Scania P310/P320Skilled Equipment Manufacturing

(One Varley Prototype)

2007 201287 Vehicles3900LPM

@1000kPA

Pumper Class 3 (Scania)


Scania P320Kuipers Engineering2017 201921 Vehicles4100LPM

@1000kPA

Prior to 2008, the then NSWFB designated their pumping appliance fleet into five specific Types:

During 2008, the introduction of new Scania P310 Pumpers meant the gap between Type 3/4 and 5 Pumpers was becoming negligible, along with the fact many Type 5 Pumpers were being replaced from service. This, combined with the planned withdrawal of 4x2 Type 1 Pumpers resulted in the system being reworked into a three Class system.

In 2014, Fire and Rescue NSW signed a contract with Kuipers Engineering to recycle fibreglass bodies from existing Isuzu FTR800 appliances onto new Mercedes Atego 4x2 chassis'. [58] As a result of this project, 52 vehicles have been "recycled".

Aerial Appliances

Scania P94/Telesqurt Aerial Pumper Fire and Rescue NSW SEV, Scania P94 Telesqurt Aerial Appliance on Morrow St.jpg
Scania P94/Telesqurt Aerial Pumper

FRNSW operate a total of 29 aerial appliances: [59]

ClassChassis/Aerial Make and ModelBody ManufacturerCommissionedNumberAerial Reach
Aerial PumperScania P94G TelesqurtMills Tui1999 20009 Vehicles15 Metres
Aerial PumperScania P340/P360 TelesqurtAlexander Perrie & Co2009 20124 Vehicles15 Metres
Turntable LadderIveco DL23 TTLIveco Magirus/Varley Specialised Vehicles20022 Vehicles30 Metres
Ladder PlatformMercedes K2437 BrontoAlexander Perrie & Co1996 20006 Vehicles (2 Non Operational)37 Metres
Ladder PlatformScania Bronto F37-HDTAlexander Perrie & Co2003 20083 Vehicles37 Metres
Ladder PlatformScania Bronto F27-RLHAlexander Perrie & Co2005 20074 Vehicles27 Metres
Ladder PlatformScania Bronto 44-RLHAlexander Perrie & Co20101 Vehicle44 Metres
FRNSW Scania Rescue Unit NSWFB Blacktown 063 Scania Fire Rescue pumper - Flickr - Highway Patrol Images.jpg
FRNSW Scania Rescue Unit

Rescue Appliances

FRNSW operate a total of 18 dedicated Rescue appliances and 3 USAR vehicles: [59]

ClassChassis Make and ModelBody ManufacturerCommissionedNumber
Heavy RescueIsuzu FVD950Mills Tui2000 20018 Vehicles
Heavy RescueIsuzu FVD1000Mills Tui2009 20136 Vehicles
Technical RescueScania P310Varley Specialised Vehicles2017 20184 Vehicles
Urban Search and RescueIsuzu FVD1000Streamline Truck and Body Builders20092 Vehicles
Urban Search and RescueMercedes ActrosPeki Transport Equipment20031 Vehicles

HazMat Appliances

HAZMAT Unit van NSWFB HAZMAT Unit.jpg
HAZMAT Unit van

FRNSW operate a total of 25 dedicated HazMat appliances, along with 4 HazMat related specialist vehicles: [59]

ClassChassis Make and ModelBody ManufacturerCommissionedNumber
HazMat VanMercedes SprinterETT Engineering2000 20062 Vehicles
HazMat VanMercedes SprinterNeil Ellis Fabrications201714 Vehicles
Heavy HazMatIveco International AccoMills Tui19993 Vehicles
Heavy HazMatIsuzu FVD950Varley Specialised Vehicles20076 Vehicles
HART Special OperationsIsuzu FVD1000Streamline Truck and Body Builders20091 Vehicle
CO2 TenderIsuzu FFR550/600Mills Tui1995 20122 Vehicles
Scientific VanMercedes SprinterNeil Ellis Fabrications20121 Vehicle
FRNSW Nissan Pathfinder Commander NSW Fire Rescue Nissan Pathfinder - Flickr - Highway Patrol Images (2).jpg
FRNSW Nissan Pathfinder Commander

Support Appliances

FRNSW operate a number of specialist operational support vehicles including:

ClassChassis Make and ModelBody ManufacturerCommissionedNumber
Mobile Command CentreScania G400Varley Specialised Vehicles20152 Vehicles
Hooklift TransporterScania P280Scania/Hyvalift20131 Vehicle
Hooklift TransporterIsuzu FVY1400Isuzu/Hyvalift20161 Vehicle
Logistic Support VehicleIsuzu/MitsubishiVarious2010 20177 Vehicles
Foam Transport VehicleIsuzu NPRIsuzu20171 Vehicle
Rehab VanMercedes SprinterETT Engineering2000 20062 Vehicles
Rehab VanMercedes SprinterNeil Ellis Fabrications2013 20173 Vehicles

Alpine Appliances

FRNSW operate a number of specialist alpine vehicles, which operate out of the Thredbo and Perisher Valley protecting the Snowy Mountains Skit Resorts.

ClassChassis Make and ModelBody ManufacturerCommissionedNumber
Hagglund All Terrain PumperHagglund BV 206 AMTHagglund1983 19882 Vehicles
SkidooYamaha VK450EEYamaha2004 20138 Vehicles
Quad BikePolaris Big Boss 800Polaris2010 20144 Vehicles

Community engagement

Fire and Rescue NSW engages in a variety of community training and education activities, and has partnered with GIO General [60] to promote fire risk awareness and safety. Events such as Fire Prevention Week [61] are organised by FRNSW during the year.

In 2011 FRNSW and GIO General created an advertising campaign to highlight the serious ramifications of fire in the domestic environment and to encourage people to use the free home fire safety audit tool - the advertising campaign was accompanied by a harrowing video [62] telling the story of Linda, who not only suffered a brain injury in a domestic fire, causing her to have to learn to walk and talk again, but she also lost her sister to the blaze. Additionally FRNSW worked with GIO to create a tranche of informational fire safety videos. [63]

As well as providing hands-on community support, FRNSW utilises their Twitter profile and Facebook page to engage with the wider NSW community.

See also

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London Fire Brigade statutory fire and rescue service for London, United Kingdom

The London Fire Brigade (LFB) is the statutory fire and rescue service for London. It was formed by the Metropolitan Fire Brigade Act of 1865, under the leadership of superintendent Eyre Massey Shaw.

The New Zealand Fire Service was New Zealand's main firefighting body from 1 April 1976 until 1 July 2017 - at which point it was dissolved and incorporated into the new Fire and Emergency New Zealand.

As firefighting has a rich history throughout the world, traditions in this profession vary widely from country to country.

Philip Christian Koperberg, is the Chairman of the New South Wales Emergency Management Committee, responsible for advising the New South Wales government on emergency response strategies, since 2011.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to firefighting:

Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service

Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering the county of Devon and the non-metropolitan county of Somerset in South West England. The service does not cover the unitary authorities of North Somerset and Bath and North East Somerset, which are covered by the Avon Fire and Rescue Service. It is the fifth largest fire and rescue service in the United Kingdom.

Essex County Fire and Rescue Service

Essex County Fire and Rescue Service (ECFRS) is the statutory fire and rescue service for the county of Essex in the east of England, and is one of the largest fire services in the country, covering an area of 1,338 square miles and a population of over 1.7 million people.

Hereford and Worcester Fire and Rescue Service

The Hereford and Worcester Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering Herefordshire and Worcestershire in the West Midlands region of England. The two counties consist of around 1,500 square miles, and a population of over 750,000 people.

Firefighting is the act of extinguishing destructive fires. A firefighter fights these fires with the intent to prevent destruction of life, property and the environment. Firefighting is a highly technical profession, which requires years of training and education in order to become proficient. A fire can rapidly spread and endanger many lives; however, with modern firefighting techniques, catastrophe can usually be avoided. To help prevent fires from starting, a firefighter's duties include public education and conducting fire inspections. Because firefighters are often the first responders to victims in critical conditions, firefighters often also provide basic life support as emergency medical technicians or advanced life support as licensed paramedics. Firefighters make up one of the major emergency services, along with the emergency medical service, the police, and many others.

Bushfires in Australia frequent wildfire events

Bushfires are frequent events during the warmer months of the year, due to Australia's mostly hot, dry climate. Each year, such fires impact extensive areas. On one hand, they can cause property damage and loss of human life. Certain native flora in Australia have evolved to rely on bushfires as a means of reproduction, and fire events are an interwoven and an essential part of the ecology of the continent. For thousands of years, Indigenous Australians have used fire to foster grasslands for hunting and to clear tracks through dense vegetation.

Fire appliances in the United Kingdom

Fire appliances used by the fire service in the United Kingdom fit into several distinct categories and perform a wide range of general and specialised roles.

Newham Rural Fire Brigade organization

The Newham Fire Brigade is a volunteer firefighting service located in Newham, Victoria at 1293 Rochford Road. The brigade is often referred to as the Newham CFA and was formerly known as the Newham Rural Fire Brigade. The brigade is part of the Mount Macedon Group in the Lodden-Mallee Region of the Country Fire Authority. Newham is located in the Macedon Ranges, which is one of Victoria's popular holiday spots and has a risk of bushfire during the summer months.

2018 Tathra bushfire

The 2018 Tathra bushfire was a bushfire that burned between 18 and 19 March 2018 and primarily affected parts of the South Coast region in the Australian state of New South Wales. The fire, understood to have been caused by a failure in electrical infrastructure, began in the locality of Reedy Swamp, near Tarraganda, which spread east towards Tathra in the municipality of the Bega Valley Shire.

Penrith Museum of Fire Firefighting museums in New South Wales, Australia

The Penrith Museum of Fire is a firefighting museum that contains heritage-listed former operating and now stored for preservation fire service vehicles located at Museum Drive in the western Sydney suburb of Penrith in the City of Penrith local government area of New South Wales, Australia. The provenance of the firefighting vehicles date from 1841 to 1998. The fleet of vehicles was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 25 February 2013.

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