Jenny Marcroft

Last updated

Jenny Marcroft

MP
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for New Zealand First party list
Assumed office
23 September 2017
Personal details
Born1963 (age 5556)
Political party New Zealand First

Jennifer Lyn Marcroft (born 1963) is a New Zealand politician and Member of Parliament in the House of Representatives for the New Zealand First party.

A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title. Member of Congress is an equivalent term in other jurisdictions.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

New Zealand First, commonly abbreviated to NZ First, is a nationalist and populist political party in New Zealand. It was founded in July 1993, following the resignation on 19 March 1993 of its leader and founder, Winston Peters, from the then-governing National Party. It has formed governments with both major parties in New Zealand, first with the National Party from 1996 to 1998 and then with the Labour Party from 2005 to 2008 and from 2017 to present.

Contents

Early life

Both Marcroft's parents died during her childhood leaving her an orphan at 16. She then lived with a violent step-father in Rotorua who motivated her to run away from home. [1] She is part Māori on her father's side and identifies as Ngāpuhi. [1] Marcroft's mother was a family friend of former Deputy-Prime Minister Don McKinnon, who supported her entry into politics. [1]

Rotorua City in Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

Rotorua is a city on the southern shores of Lake Rotorua from which the city takes its name, located in the Bay of Plenty Region of New Zealand's North Island. It is the seat of the Rotorua District, a territorial authority encompassing Rotorua and several other nearby towns. The majority of the Rotorua District is in the Bay of Plenty Region, but a sizeable southern section and a small western section are in the Waikato Region. Rotorua is in the heart of the North Island, 60 kilometres south of Tauranga, 80 km (50 mi) north of Taupo, 105 km (65 mi) east of Hamilton, and 230 km (140 mi) southeast of the nation's most populous city, Auckland.

Māori people Indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Māori originated with settlers from eastern Polynesia, who arrived in New Zealand in several waves of canoe voyages some time between 1250 and 1300. Over several centuries in isolation, the Polynesian settlers developed a unique culture, with their own language, a rich mythology, and distinctive crafts and performing arts. Early Māori formed tribal groups based on eastern Polynesian social customs and organisation. Horticulture flourished using plants they introduced; later, a prominent warrior culture emerged.

Ngāpuhi Māori iwi (tribe) in Aotearoa New Zealand

Ngāpuhi is a Māori iwi located in the Northland region of New Zealand, and centred in the Hokianga, the Bay of Islands, and Whangarei.

Broadcasting career

Marcroft had a career spanning over 30 years in the broadcasting industry. [2] During her career she worked to ensure her pronunciation of Māori names was correct, receiving criticism for doing so. During the 1990s as a new reader she was told not to say "kia ora" at the beginning of bulletins, but decided to persist anyway. [1]

Political career

Member of parliament

New Zealand Parliament
YearsTermElectorateListParty
2017 present 52nd List9 NZ First

In 2017 election Marcroft stood for New Zealand First in the Tāmaki electorate and was placed ninth on New Zealand First's party list. [3] [2] She duly entered parliament via the party list. [4]

2017 New Zealand general election Election on 23 September 2017

The 2017 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 23 September 2017 to determine the membership of the 52nd New Zealand Parliament. The previous parliament was elected on 20 September 2014 and was officially dissolved on 22 August 2017. Voters elected 120 members to the House of Representatives under New Zealand's mixed-member proportional (MMP) voting system, a proportional representation system in which 71 members were elected from single-member electorates and 49 members were elected from closed party lists. Around 3.57 million people were registered to vote in the election, with 2.63 million (79.8%) turning out. Advance voting proved popular, with 1.24 million votes cast before election day, more than the previous two elections combined.

Tāmaki (New Zealand electorate)

Tāmaki is a parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The electorate is named after the Tamaki River that runs immediately east of the seat. The electorate is represented by Simon O'Connor, who became the National Party candidate after Allan Peachey withdrew from the 2011 election for health reasons; Peachey died before the election.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Young, Audrey (2 January 2017). "Meet the backbencher: Jenny Marcroft". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 5 January 2017.
  2. 1 2 "Newsreader announced as NZ First candidate". NewsHub. 23 August 2017. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  3. "The NZ First Party list for the 2017 General Election". Scoop.co.nz. 29 August 2017. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  4. "Successful Candidates". Electoral Commission. 23 September 2017. Retrieved 30 September 2017.