List of Grey Cup broadcasters

Last updated

The following is a list of the television and radio networks and announcers that have broadcast the Grey Cup in English.

Contents

Television

2010s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentator(s)Sideline reportersPregame hostPregame analysts
2019 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Matthew Scianitti James Duthie, Rod Smith, Brian Williams and Kate Beirness Davis Sanchez, Mike Benevides, Matt Dunigan, Milt Stegall and Henry Burris
2018 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Matthew Scianitti James Duthie, Rod Smith and Brian Williams Davis Sanchez, Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan, Milt Stegall and Henry Burris
2017 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Matthew Scianitti James Duthie, Rod Smith and Brian Williams Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan, Milt Stegall and Henry Burris
2016 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Matthew Scianitti James Duthie, Rod Smith and Brian Williams Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan, Milt Stegall and Chris Schultz
2015 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Farhan Lalji James Duthie, Rod Smith and Brian Williams Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan, Milt Stegall, Chris Schultz and Paul LaPolice
2014 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Farhan Lalji James Duthie, Rod Smith and Brian Williams Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan, Milt Stegall, Chris Schultz and Paul LaPolice
2013 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Farhan Lalji Dave Randorf and Brian Williams Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan, Milt Stegall, Chris Schultz and Paul LaPolice
2012 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Farhan Lalji Dave Randorf and Brian Williams Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan, Milt Stegall and Chris Schultz
2011 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky, Farhan Lalji and Duane Forde Dave Randorf and Brian Williams Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan and Chris Schultz
2010 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Farhan Lalji Dave Randorf and Brian Williams Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan and Chris Schultz

2000s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentator(s)Sideline reportersPregame hostPregame analysts
2009 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Farhan Lalji Dave Randorf and Brian Williams Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan and Chris Schultz
2008 TSN Chris Cuthbert Glen Suitor Sara Orlesky and Farhan Lalji Dave Randorf and Brian Williams Jock Climie, Matt Dunigan and Chris Schultz
2007 CBC Mark Lee Chris Walby Khari Jones, Steve Armitage and Brenda Irving Elliotte Friedman Daved Benefield, Khari Jones and Greg Frers
2006 CBC Mark Lee Chris Walby Darren Flutie, Steve Armitage and Brenda Irving Elliotte Friedman Sean Millington, Khari Jones and Greg Frers
2005 CBC Mark Lee Chris Walby Steve Armitage and Elliotte Friedman Brian Williams Darren Flutie, Eric Tillman and Greg Frers
2004 CBC Chris Cuthbert Chris Walby Steve Armitage and Mark Lee Brian Williams Darren Flutie, Sean Millington and Greg Frers
2003 CBC Chris Cuthbert Chris Walby Steve Armitage and Brenda Irving Brian Williams and Mark Lee Darren Flutie, Sean Millington and Greg Frers
2002 CBC Chris Cuthbert Chris Walby Steve Armitage and Brenda Irving Brian Williams and Mark Lee Eric Tillman, Danny McManus and Glen Suitor
2001 CBC Chris Cuthbert Chris Walby Steve Armitage and Brenda Irving Brian Williams Mark Lee and Glen Suitor
2000 CBC Chris Cuthbert Chris Walby Steve Armitage and Brenda Irving Brian Williams Mark Lee, Glen Suitor and Mike Clemons

Notes

  • Beginning in 2008, TSN gained exclusive coverage rights to the CFL.

1990s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentator(s)Sideline reportersPregame hostPregame analysts
1999 CBC Chris Cuthbert Chris Walby Steve Armitage and Brenda Irving Brian Williams Mark Lee and Glen Suitor
1998 CBC Chris Cuthbert Chris Walby Steve Armitage and Brenda Irving Brian Williams Mark Lee and Glen Suitor
1997 CBC Chris Cuthbert David Archer Steve Armitage and Brenda Irving Brian Williams Mark Lee, Chris Walby, and Glen Suitor
1996 CBC Chris Cuthbert James Curry and David Archer Steve Armitage and Brenda Irving Brian Williams Mark Lee and Glen Suitor
1995 CBC Don Wittman Danny Kepley Steve Armitage and Chris Cuthbert Brian Williams and Scott Oake Glen Suitor
1994 CBC [1] Don Wittman [1] James Curry and Danny Kepley Steve Armitage and Scott Oake Brian Williams Ron Lancaster and Matt Dunigan
1993 CBC Don Wittman James Curry and Danny Kepley Steve Armitage and Scott Oake Brian Williams Joe Galat and Kent Austin
1992 CBC Don Wittman Joe Galat Steve Armitage and Scott Oake Brian Williams Kent Austin
1991 CBC Don Wittman Joe Galat Steve Armitage and Scott Oake Brian Williams
1990 CBC Don Wittman Ron Lancaster Steve Armitage and Scott Oake Brian Williams
CFN Bob Irving Neil Lumsden and Nick Bastaja Dave Hodge Mike Clemons

1980s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentator(s)Sideline reportersPregame hostPregame analysts
1989 CBC Don Wittman Ron Lancaster Steve Armitage Scott Oake Don Moen and Matt Dunigan
CFN Dave Hodge Neil Lumsden and Nick Bastaja Bob Irving Dan Kepley and Mike Riley
1988 CBC Don Wittman Ron Lancaster Scott Oake Brian Williams
CFN Bob Irving Neil Lumsden Dave Hodge Joe Faragalli and Ian Beckstead
1987 CBC Don Wittman Ron Lancaster Steve Armitage and Scott Oake Brian Williams
CFN Dave Hodge Neil Lumsden Bob Irving Lary Kuharich and Jan Carinci
1986 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Wittman (second half)
Frank Rigney and Leif Pettersen (first half)
Ron Lancaster and Chuck Ealey (second half)
Brian Williams
Steve Armitage (second half)
Johnny Esaw (pregame)
Dave Hodge (halftime and postgame)
1985 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Wittman (second half)
Frank Rigney and Leif Pettersen (first half)
Ron Lancaster and Leo Cahill (second half)
Brian Williams
Steve Armitage (second half)
Johnny Esaw (pregame)
Dave Hodge (halftime and postgame)
1984 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Wittman (second half)
Frank Rigney and Leif Pettersen (first half)
Ron Lancaster and Leo Cahill (second half)
Brian Williams (first half)
Steve Armitage (second half)
Johnny Esaw (pregame)
Dave Hodge (halftime and postgame)
1983 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Wittman (second half)
Frank Rigney and Leif Pettersen (first half)
Ron Lancaster and Leo Cahill (second half)
John Wells (second half)
1982 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Wittman (second half)
Frank Rigney and Leif Pettersen (first half)
Ron Lancaster and Leo Cahill (second half)
John Wells (second half)
1981 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Wittman (second half)
Frank Rigney and Mike Wadsworth (first half)
Ron Lancaster and Leo Cahill (second half)
John Wells (second half)
1980 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Chevrier (second half)
Frank Rigney and Mike Wadsworth (first half)
Russ Jackson (second half)
John Wells (second half)

Notes

  • The 1982 Grey Cup broadcast drew the largest Canadian TV audience up to that time.
  • After the 1986 season, CTV dropped coverage of the CFL altogether. In response to this, the CFL formed its own syndicated network, called CFN (Canadian Football Network). CFN had completely separate coverage of the Grey Cup (when compared to CBC), utilizing its own production and commentators. From 1987 1989, a weekly CFN game telecast, including playoffs and the Grey Cup championship, aired in the United States on a tape-delay basis on ESPN.
    • The CFL operated the Canadian Football Network, a coalition of private broadcasters that shared league games and the Grey Cup with the CBC, from 1987 to 1990. [2]

1970s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentator(s)Sideline reportersPregame host
1979 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Chevrier (second half)
Frank Rigney and Mike Wadsworth (first half)
Russ Jackson and Terry Evanshen (second half)
Tom McKee Tom McKee Bernie Pascall
1978 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Chevrier (second half)
Frank Rigney and Mike Wadsworth (first half)
Russ Jackson (second half)
Bill Stephenson
Don Wittman
Tom McKee
1977 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Chevrier (second half)
Frank Rigney and Mike Wadsworth (first half)
Russ Jackson (second half)
Don Wittman Tom mckee, Bernie Pascall
1976 CTV
CBC
Pat Marsden (first half)
Don Chevrier (second half)
Mike Wadsworth (first half)
Frank Rigney (second half)
Bill Stephenson
Don Wittman [3]
Ernie Afaganis [3]
1975 CBC
CTV
Don Wittman (first half)
Pat Marsden (second half)
Frank Rigney (first half)
Mike Wadsworth (second half)
Bill Stephenson
Don Chevrier
Ernie Afaganis{Bernie Pascall}
1974 CBC
CTV
Don Wittman (first half)
Pat Marsden (second half)
Frank Rigney (first half)
Wally Gabler (second half)
Tom McKee Bernie Pascall Tom McKee
1973 CBC
CTV
Don Chevrier (first half)
Johnny Esaw (second half)
Russ Jackson (first half)
Dick Shatto (second half)
Tom McKee Tom McKee
1972 CBC
CTV
Don Chevrier (first half)
Johnny Esaw (second half)
Russ Jackson (first half)
Dick Shatto (second half)
Tom McKee Tom McKee
1971 CBC
CTV
Johnny Esaw (first half)
Don Chevrier (second half)
Dick Shatto (first half)
Russ Jackson (second half)
Tom McKee
1970 CBC
CTV
Johnny Esaw Dick Shatto Tom McKee Pat Marsden Bernie Pascall

Notes

  • From 1971 1986, CBC and CTV fully pooled their commentary teams for the game. The first set of commentators listed described the first half of the game, and the second set described the rest of the game.

1960s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentator(s)Sideline reportersPregame hostPregame analysts
1969 CBC Don Chevrier Ernie Afaganis Tom McKee
CTV
1968 CBC Johnny Esaw Bill Bewley Pat Marsden and Tom McKee Gene Filipski
CTV Pat Marsden and Tom McKee Gene Filipski
1967 CBC Johnny Esaw Gene Filipski Al McCann, John F. Bassett, and Don Wittman Ken Newans
CTV
1966 CBC Fred Sgambati Nobby Wirkowski Ernie Afaganis
CTV
1965 CBC Johnny Esaw
CTV
1964 CBC Don Wittman Hugh McPherson Frank Anderson
CTV Hugh McPherson
1963 CBC Don Wittman Hugh McPherson Frank Anderson
CTV
1962 CBC Johnny Esaw Steve Douglas Bernie Faloney
CTV
1961 CBC Don Wittman
1960 CBC Steve Douglas Ted Reynolds

Notes

  • From 1962 1986, CBC and CTV simulcast the Grey Cup. For 1962, 1965, 1967, 1968 and 1970, CTV's commentators were used for the dual network telecast. Meanwhile, in 1963, 1964, 1966 and 1969, CBC's announcers were provided.
    • The CBC carried the first national telecasts exclusively, but the CTV Television Network purchased rights to the 1962 game. The move sparked concern across Canada as the newly formed network was not yet available in many parts of the country. [4] The debate over whether an "event of national interest" should be broadcast by the publicly funded CBC or private broadcasters reached the floor of Parliament as members of the federal government weighed in. [5] It was decided that both networks would carry the game. [4] The two networks continued with the simulcast arrangement until 1986 when CTV ceased its coverage. [6]

1950s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentatorSideline reporterPregame hostPregame analyst
1959 CBC Steve Douglas Ted Reynolds Ward Cornell Ward Cornell
1958 CBC Steve Douglas Ted Reynolds Bob Moir Bob Moir
1957 CBC Steve Douglas Ted Reynolds Larry O'Brien Larry O'Brien
1956 CBC Steve Douglas Ted Reynolds Larry O'Brien Hal Walker and Larry O'Brien
1955 CBC Steve Douglas Hal Walker Annis Stukus
1954 CBC Steve Douglas Jack Wells
1953 CBC Steve Douglas
1952 CBC Norm Marshall Larry O'Brien Annis Stukus

Notes

  • Canadian television was in its infancy in 1952 when Toronto's CBLT paid $7,500 for the rights to carry the first televised broadcast of a Grey Cup game. [4] Within two years, it was estimated that 80 percent of the nation's 900,000 television sets were tuned into the game, [7] even though the first national telecast did not occur until 1957. [8] The Grey Cup continues to be one of Canada's most-viewed sporting events. [9]

United States

1990s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentatorSideline reporterPregame hostPregame analyst
1997 ESPN2 Rob Faulds Danny Kepley
1996 ESPN2 Gord Miller Danny Kepley Miles Gorrell
1995 ESPN2 [21] Gus Johnson [21] Mike Mayock [21]
1994 ESPN2 [22] Gus Johnson [22] Mike Mayock [22] Chris Cuthbert [22] Doug Flutie [22]

Radio

The Grey Cup game was first broadcast on radio in 1928. [23] The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) carried radio coverage of the game for 51 years until 1986, when a network of private broadcasters took over. [24]

2010s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentator(s)Sideline reportersPregame host
2019 TSN Radio Rod Black Giulio Caravatta
2018 TSN Radio Rod Black Giulio Caravatta
2017 TSN Radio Rod Black Giulio Caravatta
2016 TSN Radio Rod Black Giulio Caravatta
2015 TSN Radio Rod Black Giulio Caravatta
2014 TSN Radio Rod Black Giulio Caravatta
2013 TSN Radio Rod Black Duane Forde
2012 TSN Radio Rod Black Duane Forde
2011 Bell Media Radio Bob Irving (First Half)
Rick Ball (Second Half) [25]
Chris Burns (First Half)
Giulio Caravatta (Second Half) [25]
2010 Corus Radio Rick Moffat (First Half)
Rod Pedersen (Second Half)
Carm Carteri and Ed Philion Bryan Hall and Bob Irving

2000s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentator(s)Sideline reportersPregame host
2009 Corus Radio [26] Rod Pedersen (First Half)
Rick Moffat (Second Half) [26]
Carm Carteri and Ed Philion [26] Rick Moffat (First Half)
Rod Pedersen (Second Half) [26]
2008 The Fan Mark Stephen and Rick Moffat Greg Peterson and Ed Philion
2007 The Fan [27] Rod Pedersen [27] Carm Carteri [27]
2006 Corus Radio Rick Ball and Rick Moffat Giulio Caravatta and Tony Proudfoot
2005 Corus Radio Mark Stephen John Farlinger and Tony Proudfoot
2004 Corus Radio Mark Stephen Pete Martin and Giulio Caravatta
2002 The Team Dave Schreiber Jeff Avery
2001 The Team Dave Schreiber Jeff Avery

Notes

  • CFL teams had local broadcast contracts with terrestrial radio stations for regular season and playoff games, while The Fan Radio Network (Rogers Communications) owned the rights to the Grey Cup. [28] In 2006, Sirius Satellite Radio gained exclusive rights for North American CFL satellite radio broadcasts and broadcast 25 CFL games per season, including the Grey Cup, through 2008. [29]

1990s

YearNetworkPlay-by-playColour commentator(s)Sideline reportersPregame host
1999 Corus Radio Bob Hooper and Mark Stephen Russ Jackson and Greg Peterson
1998 Corus Radio Bob Hooper and Mark Stephen Russ Jackson and Greg Peterson
1997 Corus Radio Bob Bratina and Geoff Currier Pete Martin and Carm Carteri
1996 TSN Radio John Wells Leif Pettersen and Glen Suitor
1995 TSN Radio John Wells Leif Pettersen and Glen Suitor Darren Dutchyshen and Greg Peterson
1994 TSN Radio John Wells Leif Pettersen Gord Miller
1993 Telemedia [30] David Archer
1992 Ron Hewat Enterprises J.P. McConnell Bob Irving and Dave Siler Dave Schrieber Bill Stephenson

The 1978 and 1979 Grey Cups were broadcast to the United States by Moon Radio Network, Inc., of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. For both broadcasts, Harold Johnson of Charlotte, North Carolina, was the play-by-play announcer, and Russell Moon of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was the analyst. The 1978 halftime guest was future Hall of Famer Terry Evanshen, then of the Toronto Argonauts. The 1978 broadcast had 9 affiliates, and the 1979 broadcast had 27 affiliates.

See also

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References

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