Managerial economics

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Managerial economics deals with the application of the economic concepts, theories, tools, and methodologies to solve practical problems in a business. In other words, managerial economics is the combination of economics theory and managerial theory. It helps the manager in decision-making and acts as a link between practice and theory. [1] It is sometimes referred to as business economics and is a branch of economics that applies microeconomic analysis to decision methods of businesses or other management units.

Contents

As such, it bridges economic theory and economics in practice. [2] It draws heavily from quantitative techniques such as regression analysis, correlation and calculus. [3] If there is a unifying theme that runs through most of managerial economics, it is the attempt to optimize business decisions given the firm's objectives and given constraints imposed by scarcity, for example through the use of operations research, mathematical programming, game theory for strategic decisions, [4] and other computational methods. [5]

Overview towards Microeconomics

Managerial decision areas include:

Almost any business decision can be analyzed with managerial economics techniques, but it is most commonly applied to:

At universities, the subject is taught primarily to advanced undergraduates and graduate business students. It is approached as an integration subject. That is, it integrates many concepts from a wide variety of prerequisite courses. In many countries it is possible to read for a degree in Business Economics which often covers managerial economics, financial economics, game theory, business forecasting and industrial economics.

Scope

Managerial economics to a certain degree is prescriptive in nature as it suggests course of action to a managerial problem. Problems can be related to various departments in a firm like production, accounts, sales, etc.and it can also help in decision making.

(a) Operational issues

  1. Demand decision
  2. Production decision
  3. Theory of exchange or price theory
  4. All human economic activity

(b) Environmental issues

  1. Nature and trend of domestic business/ international environment
  2. Nature and impact of social costs and government policy

Demand decision

Demand is the willingness of potential customers to buy a commodity. It defines the market size for a commodity, and at a disaggregated level the composition of the customer base. Analysis of demand is important for a firm as its revenue, profits, and income of its employees depend on it. [8]

See also

Journals

Notes

  1. W. B. Allen, Managerial Economics Theory, Applications, and Cases, 7th Edition. Norton. Contents.
  2. William J. Baumol (1961). "What Can Economic Theory Contribute to Managerial Economics?," American Economic Review, 51(2), pp. 142-46. Abstract.
       • Ivan Png and Dale Lehman (2007, 3rd ed.). Managerial Economics. Wiley. Description and chapter-preview links.
       • M. L. Trivedi (2002). Managerial Economics: Theory & Applications, 2nd ed., Tata McGraw-Hill. Chapter-preview links.
  3. NA (2009). "managerial economics," Encyclopædia Britannica. Cached online entry.
  4. Carl Shapiro (1989). "The Theory of Business Strategy," RAND Journal of Economics, 20(1), pp. 125-137.
       • Thomas J. Webster (2003). Managerial Economics: Theory and Practice, ch. 13 & 14, Academic Press. Description.
  5. For a journal on the last subject, see Computational Economics, including an Aims & Scope link.
  6. • James O. Berger (2008)."statistical decision theory," The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics , 2nd Edition. Abstract.
       • Keisuke Hirano (2008). "decision theory in econometrics," The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, 2nd Edition. Abstract.
       • Vassilis A. Hajivassiliou (2008). "computational methods in econometrics," The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, 2nd Edition. Abstract.
  7. • Trefor Jones (2004). Business Economics and Managerial Decision Making, Wiley. Description and chapter-preview links.
       • Nick Wilkinson (2005). Managerial Economics: A Problem-Solving Approach, Cambridge University Press. Description and preview.
       • Maria Moschandreas (2000). Business Economics, 2nd Edition, Thompson Learning. Description and chapter-preview links.
  8. Prof. M.S. BHAT, and mk RAU.Managerial economic and financial analysis.Hyderabad. ISBN   978-81-7800-153-1

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