Myanmar Standard Time

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Myanmar Standard Time (MMT); (Burmese : မြန်မာ စံတော်ချိန်, [mjəmà sàɰ̃dɔ̀dʑèiɰ̃] ) formerly Burma Standard Time (BST) is the standard time in Myanmar, 6:30 hours ahead of UTC (UTC+06:30). MMT is calculated on the basis of 97° 30' longitude. [1] MMT is used all year round as Myanmar does not observe daylight saving time. [2] [3]

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Greenwich Mean Time time zone

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London, reckoned from midnight. At different times in the past, it has been calculated in different ways, including being calculated from noon; as a consequence, it cannot be used to specify a precise time unless a context is given.

Right ascension Astronomical equivalent of longitude

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MMT may refer to:

Solar time calculation of elapsed time by the apparent position of the sun

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International Date Line Imaginary line that demarcates the change of one calendar day to the next

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Nautical almanac publication describing the positions of selected celestial bodies for help in navigation

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Hong Kong Time time zone

Hong Kong Time is the time in Hong Kong, observed at UTC+08:00 all year round. The Hong Kong Observatory is the official timekeeper of the Hong Kong Time.

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Azerbaijan Time, or AZT, is a time zone used in Azerbaijan. The standard time zone is four hours ahead of UTC (UTC+04:00). The daylight saving time adjustment, Azerbaijan Summer Time (AZST), which was one hour ahead at UTC+05:00 was discontinued in March 2016.

Armenia Time time zone

Armenia Time (AMT) is a time zone used in Armenia. Armenia Time is four hours ahead of UTC at UTC+04:00.

Coordinated Universal Time Primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time

Coordinated Universal Time is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude, and is not adjusted for daylight saving time. In some countries, the term Greenwich Mean Time is used.

Time in Afghanistan is officially UTC+04:30, called Afghanistan Time or AFT. Afghanistan does not observe daylight saving time.

Time in the Czech Republic

Time in the Czech Republic is Central European Time and Central European Summer Time. Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. The Czech Republic has observed Central European Time since 1979. Until 1993 when Czechoslovakia was separated into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, they also had Central European Time and Central European Summer Time. After the summer months, time in the Czech Republic is shifted back by one hour to Central European Time. Like most states in Europe, Summer time is observed in the Czech Republic, when time is shifted forward by one hour, two hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time.

References

  1. Myanmar: Facts and Figures. Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar. 2002.
  2. Nautical Almanac Office (U S ) (17 May 2013). The Nautical Almanac for the Year 2014. Government Printing Office. p. 262. ISBN   978-0-16-091756-1.
  3. timeanddate.com, Half Hour and 45-Minute Time Zones