Thorn House (San Andreas, California)

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Thorn House
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Thorn House
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Thorn House
Location 87 E. St. Charles St., San Andreas, California
Coordinates 38°11′43″N120°40′40″W / 38.19528°N 120.67778°W / 38.19528; -120.67778 Coordinates: 38°11′43″N120°40′40″W / 38.19528°N 120.67778°W / 38.19528; -120.67778
Area 2 acres (0.81 ha)
Built c. 1857
Built by Thorn, Benjamin K.
Architectural style Gothic Revival, Carpenter Gothic
NRHP reference # 72000222 [1]
Added to NRHP February 23, 1972

The Thorn House is a historic house located at 87 E. St. Charles Street in San Andreas, California. The house, which was built in 1861, was designed in the Carpenter Gothic style. The design features decorative bargeboards, a steeply sloping roof, a porch with a second floor veranda, and nine French doors opening to the outside. The brick used to build the house was imported from Stockton. The house also includes a landscaped garden covering nearly 3 acres (1.2 ha). Calaveras County Sheriff Ben Thorn built the house; Thorn was well known for capturing outlaws such as Black Bart, and historian Richard Coke Wood called him "one of the greatest men in the history of Calaveras County". [2]

San Andreas, California Census-designated place in California, United States

San Andreas is an unincorporated census-designated place and the county seat of Calaveras County, California. The population was 2,783 at the 2010 census, up from 2,615 at the 2000 census. Like most towns in the region, it was founded during the California Gold Rush. The town is located on State Route 49 and is registered as California Historical Landmark #252.

California State of the United States of America

California is a state in the Pacific Region of the United States. With 39.6 million residents, California is the most populous U.S. state and the third-largest by area. The state capital is Sacramento. The Greater Los Angeles Area and the San Francisco Bay Area are the nation's second and fifth most populous urban regions, with 18.7 million and 8.8 million residents respectively. Los Angeles is California's most populous city, and the country's second most populous, after New York City. California also has the nation's most populous county, Los Angeles County, and its largest county by area, San Bernardino County. The City and County of San Francisco is both the country's second-most densely populated major city after New York City and the fifth-most densely populated county, behind only four of the five New York City boroughs.

Bargeboard

Bargeboard is a board fastened to the projecting gables of a roof to give them strength, protection, and to conceal the otherwise exposed end of the horizontal timbers or purlins of the roof to which they were attached. Bargeboards are sometimes moulded only or carved, but as a rule the lower edges were cusped and had tracery in the spandrels besides being otherwise elaborated. An example in Britain was one at Ockwells in Berkshire, which was moulded and carved as if it were intended for internal work.

The Thorn House was added to the National Register of Historic Places on February 23, 1972. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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