Thorp Arch Bridge

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Thorp Arch Bridge
Boston Spa bridge in 2007.jpg
Coordinates 53°54′22″N1°20′39″W / 53.90611°N 1.34404°W / 53.90611; -1.34404 Coordinates: 53°54′22″N1°20′39″W / 53.90611°N 1.34404°W / 53.90611; -1.34404
CarriesBridge Road, Boston Spa
Crosses River Wharfe
Locale Thorp Arch and Boston Spa, West Yorkshire
Official nameThorp Arch Bridge
Other name(s)Boston Spa Bridge
Characteristics
Design arch bridge
MaterialAshlar Magnesian limestone
No. of spans4
Piers in water3
History
Opened1770
Location
Thorp Arch Bridge

Thorp Arch Bridge (sometimes known locally as Boston Spa Bridge) is a stone arch bridge opened in 1770 across the River Wharfe linking the West Yorkshire villages of Boston Spa on the southbank and Thorp Arch on the north.

Contents

Description

Thorp Arch bridge has five arched spans, two of which are over the current course of the river Wharfe is built of Ashlar magnesian limestone. The central arch has triangular cutwaters which accommodate pedestrian refuges in the parapets (the bridge has a footpath only to its upstream side), the remaining piers have cutwaters terminating in offsets. [1]

The bridge carries the 7 bus route from Harrogate to Leeds via Wetherby, which is operated by the Harrogate Bus Company.

Cracks

In February 2022, the bridge was briefly closed due to cracks appearing in the road surface. "Boston Spa Bridge closed" . Retrieved 21 February 2022.

See also

Related Research Articles

Boston Spa Village and civil parish in West Yorkshire, England

Boston Spa is a village and civil parish in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough in West Yorkshire, England. Situated 3 miles (5 km) south of Wetherby, Boston Spa is on the south bank of the River Wharfe which separates it from Thorp Arch. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 4,006 rising to 4,079 in the 2011 census.

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Walton is a village and civil parish 2 miles (3 km) east of Wetherby, West Yorkshire, England. It is adjacent to Thorp Arch village and Thorp Arch Trading Estate. The village is in the LS23 Leeds postcode area, post town WETHERBY. The nearest locally important town is Wetherby, with Tadcaster and the large village of Boston Spa nearby. Walton has a population of 225. increasing slightly to 225 at the 2011 Census.

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Wetherby Bridge is a scheduled monument and Grade II-listed bridge over the River Wharfe in Wetherby, West Yorkshire dating from the 13th-century. The bridge connects Micklethwaite on the south bank to the town centre on the north. It formerly carried the A1 Great North Road but now carries the A661 Boston Road leading to Boston Spa and the south.

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Linton Bridge carries the minor road that links Collingham and Linton over the River Wharfe near Wetherby in West Yorkshire, England.

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Thorp Arch railway station was a station in the parish of Wetherby, West Yorkshire, on the Harrogate–Church Fenton line. It opened on 10 August 1847 and served nearby Thorp Arch as well as Boston Spa. The station closed to passengers on 6 January 1964 and completely on 10 August 1964.

Ripon Spa Baths Grade II listed building in Ripon, North Yorkshire

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References

  1. "Thorp Arch Bridge, Thorp Arch". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 26 February 2016.