Three Brothers, Lancashire

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Three Brothers
Limestone boulders, Warton Crag - geograph.org.uk - 1047895.jpg
Location Lancashire
Coordinates 54°09′17″N2°46′31″W / 54.15465°N 2.77539°W / 54.15465; -2.77539 Coordinates: 54°09′17″N2°46′31″W / 54.15465°N 2.77539°W / 54.15465; -2.77539
Architectural style(s) British pre-Roman Architecture
Location map United Kingdom City of Lancaster.svg
Red pog.svg
Location of Three Brothers in the City of Lancaster district

The Three Brothers (grid reference SD494734 ) are three erratic boulders [1] or standing stone hilltop altars located in the hills above Morecambe Bay, immediately north of Warton Crag. The site was surveyed by Alexander Thom. [2] It is accessible along a footpath through woodland. [1]

Ordnance Survey National Grid System of geographic grid references used in Great Britain

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Altar structure upon which offerings such as sacrifices are made for religious purposes

An altar is a structure upon which offerings such as sacrifices are made for religious purposes. Altars are found at shrines, temples, churches and other places of worship. They are used particularly in Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Shinto and Taoism. Judaism used such a structure until the destruction of the Second Temple. Many historical faiths also made use of them, including Roman, Greek and Norse religion.

Morecambe Bay estuary in northwest England

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