Thryptomene calycina

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Thryptomene calycina
Thryptomene calycina1.jpg
Thryptomene calycina, the Grampians, Victoria
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Thryptomene
Species:
T. calycina
Binomial name
Thryptomene calycina
Synonyms
  • Baeckea calycinaLindl.
  • Paryphantha mitchellianaSchauer nom. illeg.
  • Thryptomene mitchelliana(Schauer) F.Muell.
  • Tryptomene mitchellianaorth. var. F.Muell.
  • Thryptomene thymifoliaStapf
  • Thryptomene calycina(Lindl.) J.M.Black

Thryptomene calycina, commonly known as Grampians thryptomene, is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae. [1] The species is endemic to Australia. It grows to 2 metres high, has small leaves and produces white flowers between July and November in the species' native range. [2] It is listed as "Rare in Victoria" on the Department of Sustainability and Environment's Advisory List of Rare Or Threatened Plants In Victoria. [3]

Shrub type of plant

A shrub or bush is a small- to medium-sized perennial woody plant. Unlike herbaceous plants, shrubs have persistent woody stems above the ground. They are distinguished from trees by their multiple stems and shorter height, less than 6 m-10 m (20 ft–33 ft) tall. Small shrubs, less than 2 m (6.6 ft) tall are sometimes termed subshrubs.

Myrtaceae family of plants

Myrtaceae or the myrtle family is a family of dicotyledonous plants placed within the order Myrtales. Myrtle, pohutukawa, bay rum tree, clove, guava, acca (feijoa), allspice, and eucalyptus are some notable members of this group. All species are woody, contain essential oils, and have flower parts in multiples of four or five. The leaves are evergreen, alternate to mostly opposite, simple, and usually entire. The flowers have a base number of five petals, though in several genera the petals are minute or absent. The stamens are usually very conspicuous, brightly coloured and numerous.

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 26 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide.

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References

  1. "Thryptomene calycina". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 1 May 2011.
  2. Wild Plants of Victoria (database). Viridans Biological Databases & Department of Sustainability and Environment. 2009.
  3. "Advisory List of Rare Or Threatened Plants In Victoria - 2005" (PDF). Department of Sustainability and Environment (Victoria). 2005. p. 39. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 March 2012. Retrieved 1 May 2011.