Thwaitesia

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Thwaitesia
Thwaitesia.affinis.female.svg
T. affinis, female
Bling Spider - Neon Spider - Thwaitsia sp. from the NSW Central Coast (7).jpg
Thwaitsia sp. from the NSW Central Coast
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Araneomorphae
Family: Theridiidae
Genus: Thwaitesia
O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1881 [1]
Type species
T. margaritifera
O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1881
Species

23, see text

Synonyms [1]
  • TopoExline, 1950 [2]

Thwaitesia is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by Octavius Pickard-Cambridge in 1881. [3]

Contents

T. affinis females are 4.5 millimetres (0.18 in) long, and males are 2.7 millimetres (0.11 in) long. T. bracteata are about the same size. They are similar in appearance to members of both Spintharus and Episinus .

Species

As of June 2020 it contains twenty-three species, found in the tropics worldwide: [1]

Formerly included:

Nomen dubium

See also

Related Research Articles

Theridiidae Family of spiders

Theridiidae, also known as the tangle-web spiders, cobweb spiders and comb-footed spiders, is a large family of araneomorph spiders first described by Carl Jakob Sundevall in 1833. This diverse, globally distributed family includes over 3,000 species in 124 genera, and is the most common arthropod found in human dwellings throughout the world.

Long-jawed orb weaver Family of spiders

Long-jawed orb weavers or long jawed spiders (Tetragnathidae) is a family of araneomorph spiders first described by Anton Menge in 1866. They have elongated bodies, legs, and chelicerae, and build small orb webs with an open hub with few, wide-set radii and spirals with no signal line or retreat. Some species are often found in long vegetation near water.

<i>Theridiosoma</i> Genus of spiders

Theridiosoma is a genus of ray spiders that was first described by Octavius Pickard-Cambridge in 1879.

<i>Steatoda</i> spider

The spider genus Steatoda, in the family Theridiidae, includes about 120 recognized species, distributed around the world. One common name is cupboard spider, for many species build their webs in dark, sheltered, undisturbed places around the house or garden, in sheds and garages, under garden furniture, compost bins, and the like. Signs of the cupboard spider include small white spots of spider droppings, like small splashes of paint, on the floor underneath the web.

<i>Episinus</i> Genus of spiders

Episinus is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by Pierre André Latreille in 1809.

<i>Argyrodes</i> Genus of spiders

Argyrodes, also called dewdrop spiders, is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by Eugène Louis Simon in 1864. They occur worldwide, and are best known for their kleptoparasitism. They can spin their own webs, but tend to invade and reside in their hosts' webs. This relationship can be commensal or even mutual if the dewdrop spider feeds on small trapped insects that are not eaten by the host. Some species can even prey upon the host.

<i>Theridion</i> genus of arachnids

Theridion is a genus of tangle-web spiders with almost 600 described species around the world. Notable species are the Hawaiian happy face spider (T. grallator), named for the iconic symbol on its abdomen, and T. nigroannulatum, one of few spider species that lives in social groups, attacking prey en masse to overwhelm them as a team.

<i>Chrysso</i> Genus of spiders

Chrysso is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by Octavius Pickard-Cambridge in 1882.

<i>Wirada</i> Genus of spiders

Wirada is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by Eugen von Keyserling in 1886.

<i>Chrosiothes</i> Genus of spiders

Chrosiothes is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by Eugène Louis Simon in 1894. It is considered a senior synonym of Theridiotis.

<i>Tetragnatha</i> Genus of spiders

Tetragnatha is a genus of long-jawed orb-weavers found all over the world. It was first described by Pierre André Latreille in 1804, and it contains hundreds of species. Most occur in the tropics and subtropics, and many can run over water. They are commonly called stretch spiders in reference to their elongated body form and their ability to hide on blades of grass or similar elongated substrates by stretching their front legs forward and the others behind them. The name Tetragnatha is derived from Greek, tetra- a numerical prefix referring to four and gnatha meaning "jaw". On the Hawaiian islands, a shift of cursorial behavior occurred long ago, when their ancestors first arrived on the island chain.

<i>Euryopis</i> Genus of spiders

Euryopis is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by Anton Menge in 1868.

<i>Dipoena</i> Genus of spiders

Dipoena is a genus of tangle-web spiders that was first described by Tamerlan Thorell in 1869.

<i>Phoroncidia</i> Genus of spiders

Phoroncidia is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by J. O. Westwood in 1835.

<i>Faiditus</i> Genus of spiders

Faiditus is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by Eugen von Keyserling in 1884.

Helvibis is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by Eugen von Keyserling in 1884. It is a senior synonym of Formicinoides.

<i>Rhomphaea</i> Genus of spiders

Rhomphaea is a genus of comb-footed spiders that was first described by Ludwig Carl Christian Koch in 1872.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Gloor, Daniel; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Blick, Theo; Kropf, Christian (2020). "Gen. Thwaitesia O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1881". World Spider Catalog Version 20.0. Natural History Museum Bern. doi:10.24436/2 . Retrieved 2020-07-14.
  2. Levi, H. W.; Levi, L. R. (1962). "The genera of the spider family Theridiidae". Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. 127: 31.
  3. Pickard-Cambridge, O. (1881). "On some new genera and species of Araneidea". Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. 49 (3): 765–775. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.1881.tb01333.x.

Further reading