Tohatchi, New Mexico

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Tohatchi, New Mexico
Tó Haachʼiʼ (Navajo)
CDP
McKinley County New Mexico Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Tohatchi Highlighted.svg
Location of Tohatchi, New Mexico
USA New Mexico location map.svg
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Tohatchi
Location in the United States
Usa edcp location map.svg
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Tohatchi
Tohatchi (the United States)
Coordinates: 35°51′1″N108°45′3″W / 35.85028°N 108.75083°W / 35.85028; -108.75083
Country Flag of the United States (23px).png  United States
State Flag of New Mexico.svg  New Mexico
County McKinley
Government
  Type Chapter (Navajo Nation)
Area
[1]
  Total6.60 sq mi (17.09 km2)
  Land6.47 sq mi (16.75 km2)
  Water0.13 sq mi (0.33 km2)
Elevation
6,447 ft (1,965 m)
Population
 (2020) [2]
  Total785
  Density121.37/sq mi (46.86/km2)
Time zone UTC-7 (Mountain (MST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-6 (MDT)
ZIP code
87325
Area code 505
FIPS code 35-78440
GNIS feature ID0902849

Tohatchi (Navajo : Tó Haachʼiʼ) is a census-designated place (CDP) in McKinley County, New Mexico, United States. It is known as a health-services and education hub along Highway 491. Its population was reported to be 785 at the 2020 census. As Tohatchi is located on the Navajo Nation, it is designated federal trust land.

Contents

Geography

Tohatchi is located at 35°51′1″N108°45′3″W / 35.85028°N 108.75083°W / 35.85028; -108.75083 (35.850262, -108.750709). [3]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.3 square miles (16 km2), of which 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (2.06%) is covered by water.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
2010 808
2020 741−8.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [4] [2]

As of the census [5] of 2010, 825 people, 292 households, and 225 families resided in the CDP. The population density was 167.8 inhabitants per square mile (64.8/km2). The 345 housing units had an average density of 55.8 per square mile (21.5/km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 90.36% Native American, 6.85% White, 0.29% Pacific Islander, 0.10% African American, 0.10% Asian, 0.29% from other races, and 2.03% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.15% of the population.

Of the 292 households, 42.5% had children under 18 living with them, 49.3% were married couples living together, 22.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.9% were not families. About 19.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 2.7% had someone living alone who was 65 or older. The average household size was 3.55, and the average family size was 4.18.

In the CDP, the age distribution was 36.3% under 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 19.9% from 45 to 64, and 6.2% who were 65 or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.8 males. For every 100 females 18 and over, there were 86.7 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $28,167, and for a family was $33,750. Males had a median income of $22,917 versus $21,429 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $10,217. About 32.0% of families and 31.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 34.4% of those under age 18 and 42.9% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Gallup-McKinley County Schools

The three local public schools in Tohatchi are operated by Gallup McKinley County Schools. [6] They include Tohatchi Elementary School, Tohatchi Middle School, and Tohatchi High School. The public schools are located west of Highway 491.

The Tohatchi mascot for the Gallup-McKinley County Schools is a cougar, with the school colors being maroon and gold. The Tohatchi High School Lady Cougars notably won the 2017 New Mexico high school girls 3-A basketball championship. [7] [8]

Before Tohatchi High School was built in the 1980s, the mascot had previously been a bobcat, but the mascot was changed to a cougar sometime in the 1970s. The school colors were different, as well.

BIE/BIA schools

Tohatchi Indian School, 1932 New Mexico - Silver City through Zuni Buttes - NARA - 68144889 (cropped).jpg
Tohatchi Indian School, 1932

Formerly Chuska Boarding School, Ch'ooshgai Community School [9] is a grant school boarding facility of the Bureau of Indian Education that offers kindergarten through eighth grade. [10]

The Bureau of Indian Affairs previously had a bureau-operated boarding school, Tohatchi Boarding School, [11] but it was shut down after the addition of public schools to Tohatchi.[ citation needed ] Cindy Yurth of the Navajo Times described it as one of the first such schools on the Navajo Indian Reservation. Its students included children from Tuba City, Arizona. According to Tohatchi Chapter President Edwin Begay, his father told him that the townsite was formerly an area maintained by the school to have swine. [12] In 1979, the school had Navajo-language classes and one of the few Navajo school principals on the Navajo Nation at the time, Phillip Belone. [11]

Private school

A private, non-profit facility for students with special needs began in 1976 at Chuska Boarding School. The program aimed to provide opportunities for engaging in life skills, academics, and vocational education, as an effort to develop and maintain special education services for the local indigenous community. Called "A School for Me, Inc.", it served 76 students in 1977 [13] and only 58 in 1982. [14]

Local tribal government

Tohatchi has a chapter house, a local administrative office that governs a part of the Fort Defiance Agency of the Navajo Nation. It was built in 1952 and renovated in 1989. [15]

Notable people

In film

The 1965 film The Hallelujah Trail , directed by John Sturges and starring Burt Lancaster, was shot in nearby locations with the Chuska Mountains serving as a backdrop to some of the movie's most iconic scenes. [18]

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 12, 2022.
  2. 1 2 "Census Population API". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 12, 2022.
  3. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  4. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  5. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  6. "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: McKinley County, NM" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau . Retrieved July 20, 2021.
  7. "Max Preps". March 10, 2017. Retrieved March 17, 2017.
  8. "Navajo Times". March 16, 2017. Retrieved March 17, 2017.
  9. "Ch'ooshgai Community School". Ch'ooshgai Community School, Inc. Retrieved January 31, 2020.
  10. "Residential". Ch'ooshgai Community School. Retrieved July 22, 2021.
  11. 1 2 Ivins, Molly (February 4, 1979). "Management nightmare of BIA shows in problems with boarding schools". Rapid City Journal . Rapid City, South Dakota. New York Times News Service. p. 14. - Clipping from Newspapers.com.
  12. Yurth, Cindy (May 29, 2014). "Tohatchi can develop if it chooses to". Navajo Times . Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  13. "Projects in Progress." Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, [Education Division], Office of Education, Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education. Dec 31, 1979. Accessed January 30, 2020.
  14. United States Department of the Interior Budget Justifications F.Y. 1984 (PDF) (Report). Bureau of Indian Affairs. 1984. p. BIA-34. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  15. "History". Tohatchi Chapter. Retrieved January 31, 2020.
  16. Cook, Roy. "Reclaiming the Pride of the Dine' Culture". AmericanIndianSource.com. Navajo Times. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  17. Clark, Carol A. (November 21, 2012). "Udall Presents Medals to Navajo WW II Veteran" (Web.). L.A. Daily Post. Retrieved November 9, 2021. [Wilson] Halona, a native of Tohatchi, N.M., served in the European Theater of World War II from 1943 to 1945.
  18. Donovan, Bill (July 17, 2014). "50 Years Ago: 'Hallelujah Trail' makes the news". Navajo Times . Retrieved January 30, 2024. The producers of the movie set up the office to hire Navajos as movie extras during the two or three weeks of filming in the Tohatchi, N.M., area.

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