Tolyatti

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Tolyatti
Тольятти
Pamiatnik V. N. Tatishchevu, Portposiolok, Tol'iatti, Samarskaia oblast'.jpg
AvtoVAZ administration building-5389.JPG
Preobrazhensky Sobor, Togliatti, Russia.JPG
Administration of city, Tolyatti, Russia.JPG
Clockwise from top: The Tatishchev Monument, Spaso-Preobrazhensky Cathedral, City Hall of Tolyatti, The administration building of AvtoVAZ.
Flag of Togliatti.svg
Coat of Arms of Togliattil.svg
Location of Tolyatti
Tolyatti
Outline Map of Samara Oblast.svg
Red pog.svg
Tolyatti
Location of Tolyatti
European Russia laea location map (Crimea disputed).svg
Red pog.svg
Tolyatti
Tolyatti (European Russia)
Coordinates: 53°30′32″N49°25′20″E / 53.50889°N 49.42222°E / 53.50889; 49.42222
Country Russia
Federal subject Samara Oblast [2]
Founded1737;287 years ago (1737)
Government
  Body City Duma
   Mayor Nikolay Rentz
Elevation
90 m (300 ft)
Population
  Estimate 
(2018) [3]
707,408
  Subordinated to city of oblast significance of Tolyatti [2]
   Capital of Stavropolsky District, [1] city of oblast significance of Tolyatti [2]
  Urban okrugTogliatti Urban Okrug [4]
   Capital ofTogliatti Urban Okrug, [4] Stavropolsky Municipal District [4]
Time zone UTC+4 (MSK+1   OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg [5] )
Postal code(s) [6]
445xxx
Dialing code(s) +7 8482 [7]
OKTMO ID36740000001
Website tgl.ru

Tolyatti (Russian : Тольятти, IPA: [tɐlʲˈjætʲ(ː)ɪ] ), also known as Togliatti, formerly known as Stavropol [lower-alpha 1] (1737–1964), is a city in Samara Oblast, Russia. It is the largest city in Russia which is neither the administrative center of a federal subject, nor the largest city of a subject. Population: 684,709(2021 Census); [8] 719,632(2010 Census); [9] 702,879(2002 Census); [10] 630,543(1989 Census). [11]

Contents

Historical population
YearPop.±%
18975,969    
19266,473+8.4%
19399,345+44.4%
195961,281+555.8%
1970250,853+309.3%
1979502,036+100.1%
1989630,543+25.6%
2002702,879+11.5%
2010719,632+2.4%
2021684,709−4.9%
Source: Census data

The city is best known as the home of Russia's largest car manufacturer AvtoVAZ (Lada), where it was renamed after Italian communist politician Palmiro Togliatti in 1964. [12] For this reason, Tolyatti is often dubbed "Russia's motor city" or "Russia's Motown" (in reference to Detroit in the United States—the spiritual home of the American automotive industry).

History

Tolyatti was founded in 1737 as a fortress called Stavropol (Ста́врополь) by the Russian statesman Vasily Tatishchev. [13] Informally it was often referred as Stavropol-on-Volga (Ста́врополь-на-Во́лге, Stavropol-na-Volge) to distinguish from Stavropol, a larger city in southwest Russia, although Stavropol-on-Volga was never its official name. [14] [15]

The construction of the Kuybyshev Dam and Hydroelectric Station on the Volga River in the 1950s created the Kuybyshev Reservoir, which flooded the existing location of the city, and it was completely rebuilt on a new site.

In 1964, the city was chosen as the location of the new VAZ automobile plant: a joint venture between Fiat and the Soviet government. It was then renamed Tolyatti (after Palmiro Togliatti, the longest-serving secretary of the Italian Communist Party, who had been instrumental in setting up the venture with Fiat). Much of the modern city was constructed in the 1960s to house the workers of the factory, and today, AvtoVAZ dominates the economy of the city. [16]

Administrative and municipal status

City divisions

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Avtozavodsky City District
Tsentralny (Central) City District
Komsomolsky City District Raiony Tol'iatti.png
City divisions
  Avtozavodsky City District
  Tsentralny (Central) City District
  Komsomolsky City District

Within the framework of administrative divisions, Tolyatti serves as the administrative center of Stavropolsky District, [1] even though it is not a part of it. [17] As an administrative division, it is incorporated separately as the city of oblast significance of Tolyatti—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts. [2] As a municipal division, the city of oblast significance of Tolyatti is incorporated as Tolyatti Urban Okrug. [4]

City divisions

For the administrative purposes, the city is divided into three districts:

Economy

AvtoVAZ administration building AvtoVAZ administration building-5389.JPG
AvtoVAZ administration building

The city's main claim to fame has been automobiles Lada (Zhiguli) manufactured by AvtoVAZ car plant employing some 110,000 people: in cooperation with Italy's Fiat since 1970, with General Motors since 2001 [18] and with the Renault-Nissan Alliance since 2012, and once again becoming an independent, state-owned enterprise in 2022.

Other industries have moved into Tolyatti because it is close to abundant supplies of electricity and water. Petrochemicals are well represented in the city. Among the significant enterprises based there are "TogliattiAzot" (Russia's biggest ammonia manufacturer headed[ when? ] by Sergei Makhlai) and "KuibyshevAzot" (a nitrogen fertilizer manufacturer and Russia's biggest caprolactam and polyamide producer). Other industries include building materials production, ship repair and electrical equipment and electronics.[ citation needed ]

In 2011 the Tolyatti Special Economic Zone was launched in order to develop the region further and diversify the economy of the city. Several auto-component producers (German Mubea and Japanese Sanoh among them) have since been registered, as well as large industrial manufacturers (Praxair and Edscha). By November 2012 the value of project investment totalled 10 billion Rubles and around 3000 jobs were being created. [19]

Transportation

The transport system is well developed in the city. Public transport includes municipal buses and trolley-buses, and so-called "alternative" (commercial) transport or marshrutkas.

External transport routes are provided by two bus stations, two railway stations and a city harbour. Tolyatti has its airport as well, but it is used by personal aircraft only (the nearest international airport, Kurumoch, is located 40 km away, towards Samara). The city is linked to the federal road network by the M5 "Ural" highway.[ citation needed ]

Culture, education, and sports

The creation of the Kuybyshev Reservoir in the 1950s destroyed much of the city's history, so almost all the city's cultural points of interest date from the Soviet period, but the city administration has continued to build new monuments and cathedrals. A recent notable event was the 1998 opening of the large Tatishchev Monument near the Volga. The Transfiguration Cathedral was completed in 2002.

Education

Education is represented by over one hundred public and ten private schools, as well as several higher education institutions. Most notable ones include:

School number 13 School 13 after reconstruction, Togliatti, Russia.JPG
School number 13

Museums

Sports

In the eyes of the Soviet leaders, Tolyatti was a perfect Soviet city (since most population migrated here during the construction of AvtoVAZ factories) – many sports facilities appeared so that the "perfect Soviet person" could be healthy. The city has high-quality sports facilities: gymnasiums, swimming pools, ice arenas, association football and racing stadiums — as a result, many athletes, including Olympic Champion Alexei Nemov, Stanley Cup winners Alexei Kovalev and Ilya Bryzgalov had moved to Tolyatti. Former Montreal Canadiens defenseman Alexei Emelin, and former Washington Capitals winger Viktor Kozlov and defenseman Alexei Tezikov were born there. Daria Kasatkina, a professional tennis player, was born there. [20]

Tolyatti is represented in almost every kind of team sports. Tolyatti's Lada-sponsored Ice Hockey Club broke the Moscow teams' domination of the game. The Lada women's football team has won the Russian championship several times — and the Lada women's handball team, who are the Russian and European Champions, is the core for Russian national women's handball. Men's football (FC Lada Togliatti and FC Togliatti), basketball, speedway and handball teams also take part in national championships. As for the traditional national sport of Russia, bandy, there is a team founded in 2013, TOAZ, [21] which however only takes part in a recreational league.

Parks and monuments

Loyalty Monument: Kostya looks east across Lev Yashin Street and down South Highway Dog Monument, Togliatti, Russia.JPG
Loyalty Monument: Kostya looks east across Lev Yashin Street and down South Highway

Tolyatti has many parks, and many of these contain monuments of cultural, historical, and aesthetic interest. Examples include Victory Park with its Victory Monument and other monuments, Liberty Square with its Obelisk of Glory and other monuments, Central Park with its Mourning Angel (a memorial to victims of Soviet repression), large statue of Lenin, and other monuments, and other parks.

And there are other monuments outside the parks. The City Duma has been energetic in creating or designating historical and cultural monuments, ranging from the colossal equestrian Tatishchev Monument to the tumbledown Repin House and a monument to a faithful dog, and many other types.

Media

There are a number of local newspapers published in Tolyatti: Ploshchad Svobody, Tolyattinskoye Obozreniye (Tolyatti Observer), business newspaper "Monday" ("Ponedelnik"), Volny Gorod, Gorodskiye Vedomosti, and a few others. In the end of the 1990s, Tolyattinskoye Obozreniye published a series of articles on a local crime group. The stories drew attention to the group's connections with the local police. [22] [23] Subsequently, Togliatti Review saw two of its editors (Valery Ivanov and Alexei Sidorov) killed in 2002–2003. [24] [25] [26] [27]

The only local-born FM-band radio station is Radio August  [ ru ] at 70.64 and 102.3 MHz.

Religion

Tolyatti is a multi-ethnic and multi-religious city. Most religious people in the city are of the Orthodox Christian faith. Muslims are the second largest group of believers. [28] Also in the city are organizations of almost all major religions: Old Believers, Catholics, Jews, Protestants, Buddhists and others.

Voskresenskiy (Resurrection) Monastery, the city of Tolyatti The Resurrection Monastery (Tolyatti) 04821-c.jpg
Voskresenskiy (Resurrection) Monastery, the city of Tolyatti

Crime

October 2007 bomb attack

During the morning rush hour of 31 October 2007, a bomb exploded on a passenger bus in the city, killing at least eight people and injuring about 50 in what Irina Doroshenko, a spokeswoman for the investigative wing of the local prosecutor's office, said could be a terrorist attack. [29] At the beginning of the investigation, it was believed to be the work of terrorists from the North Caucasus.[ citation needed ] Early reports indicated possible involvement of Chechen terrorist Doku Umarov.[ citation needed ] However, the officials later named a 21-year-old Evgeny Vakhrushev, who also died in the blast, as the only person to be responsible for the tragedy.[ citation needed ]

Organized crime

The city also has a reputation for gang violence. [30] [31]

Violent crimes

The city has witnessed a mafia killing spree: there have been 550 commissioned killings in Tolyatti over 1998–2004, five of those murdered were journalists. [32]

Three chief architects of Tolyatti were victims of violent crimes: Valery Lopatin was shot to death on July 7, 2004, Mikhail Syardin and Aleksander Kiryakov were also injured in violent attacks. [33]

A former city mayor (1994–2000), Sergey Zhilkin  [ ru ], was murdered on November 15, 2008. [34]

On December 13, 2008, Anatoly Stepanov, a vice-speaker of Duma of Samara Oblast, a former head of administration of Tsentralny City District of Tolyatti in 1991-1997 and Tolyatti mayor candidate in 2004, was attacked on a street and left with serious head injuries. He died in hospital on February 24, 2009. [35]

Corruption

The city's mayor in 2000–2007, Nikolay Utkin  [ ru ], was sentenced to seven years in prison on corruption charges. [36] [37] [38]

Local government

Mayor Antashev Sergey Alexandrovich was born on December 16, 1959, in the city of Saransk, Mordovia. In 1994 he moved to Tolyatti, was accepted to the post of director of the heating network enterprise of TEVIS. In 2000 he graduated from the International Market Institute with a degree in management. From 2000 to April 9, 2012 - Marketing Director - Energy Sales Director of TEVIS. Deputy of the Duma of the city district of Togliatti IV (from 2005 to 2009) and V (from 2008 to 2012) convocations. From April 2012 to February 2015, he served as deputy mayor of the city of Tolyatti on urban economy. On April 12, 2017, the Tolyatti City Council appointed Sergey Antashev as the mayor of the city. [39]

On March 4, 2021, Igor Ladyka was appointed acting mayor of the Togliatti city district, in connection with the resignation of Sergei Antashev. [40]

On April 30, 2021, Nikolai Rentz took office as head of the Togliatti city district. [41] [42] The inauguration ceremony was attended by the Governor of the Samara Region Dmitry Azarov. [43] [44]

Twin towns – sister cities

Tolyatti is twinned with: [45]

Partner cities

Notable people

Notes

  1. Russian: Ставрополь. Also referred to as Stavropol-on-Volga (Russian: Ставрополь-на-Волге, romanized: Stavropol-na-Volge) or Stavropol-Volzhsky (Russian: Ставрополь–Волжский).

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  31. Криминальная история Тольятти Crime history of Tolyatti.
  32. Russian journalism comes under fire Paul Jenkins, BBC, 2 July 2004.
  33. В Тольятти новый главный архитектор Archived April 20, 2012, at the Wayback Machine Tolyatti has a new chief architect, TLT.ru, April 10, 2009. (in Russian)
  34. "Togliatti State University: We are mouring". Archived from the original on March 10, 2012. Retrieved August 27, 2010.
  35. Загадки убийства Степанова Mysteries in assassination of Stepanov, TLTgorod.ru. (in Russian)
  36. Togliatti Mayor Suspected of Extorting 4-Storey House Archived September 16, 2010, at the Wayback Machine Pavel Sedakov, Kommersant, 17 August 2007.
  37. Mayoral Elections Criticized After Arrest Archived March 14, 2012, at the Wayback Machine Natalya Krainova, The St. Petersburg Times, 2 March 2010.
  38. "Экс-мэр Тольятти Николай Уткин осужден на семь лет". February 12, 2008.
  39. "Общая информация / Администрация городского округа Тольятти / Структура администрации / Власть / Администрация городского округа Тольятти". tgl.ru.
  40. "Igor Ladyka appointed Acting Head of the city of Togliatti". tgl.ru. March 4, 2021. Retrieved July 8, 2022.
  41. Дмитрий Азаров уверен, что у Николая Ренца получится конструктивный диалог с тольяттинцами City Traffic (in Russian). April 30, 2021. Retrieved January 27, 2023
  42. "Новый мэр Тольятти приступает к работе". April 30, 2021.
  43. "Николай Ренц вступил в должность главы Тольятти". April 30, 2021.
  44. "Губернатор поздравил Николая Ренца со вступлением в должность мэра Тольятти". April 30, 2021.
  45. "Города побратимы". tgl.ru (in Russian). Tolyatti. Retrieved February 4, 2020.
  46. Tolyatti profile and statistics at KHL.ru

Sources