Torbay (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 50°27′36″N3°32′17″W / 50.460°N 3.538°W / 50.460; -3.538

Contents

Torbay
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Torbay2007Constituency.svg
Boundary of Torbay in Devon
EnglandDevon.svg
Location of Devon within England
County Devon
Electorate 76,219 (December 2010) [1]
Major settlements Paignton and Torquay
Current constituency
Created 1974 (1974)
Member of Parliament Kevin Foster (Conservative)
Number of membersOne
Created from Torquay

Torbay is a constituency [n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by Kevin Foster, a Conservative. [n 2]

Boundaries

1974–1983: The County Borough of Torbay.

1983–2010: The Borough of Torbay wards of Cockington with Chelston, Coverdale, Ellacombe, Preston, St Marychurch, St Michael's with Goodrington, Shiphay, Tormohun, and Torwood.

2010–present: The Borough of Torbay wards of Clifton with Maidenway, Cockington with Chelston, Ellacombe, Goodrington with Roselands, Preston, Roundham with Hyde, St Marychurch, Shiphay with the Willows, Tormohun, Watcombe, and Wellswood.

The constituency covers the majority of the Torbay unitary authority in Devon, including the seaside resorts of Torquay and most of Paignton. The remainder of the borough is covered by the Totnes constituency.

History

Political history

After being held for several Parliaments (taking together various predecessor areas) by Conservatives, from 1997 the seat was held by Liberal Democrats until 2015 when a Conservative re-took it.

Prominent frontbenchers

Sir Frederic Bennett did not achieve his own ministry nationally, but he chaired in the European Parliament the European Democrats group.

Constituency profile

Consisting almost entirely of coastal towns and villages, the constituency has a range of shopping, tourist and visitor facilities from Paignton Zoo, safe bathing and boating to mini-golf, as well as a few nearby luxury resorts. Perhaps owing to the seasonal rise in employment, workless claimants, registered jobseekers, were in November 2012 significantly higher than the national average of 3.8%, at 5.0% of the population based on a statistical compilation by The Guardian . [2]

The seat is home to the Plainmoor football ground, home to Torquay United. Past MP Adrian Sanders is a notable supporter of the football club.

Members of Parliament

ElectionMember [3] Party
Feb 1974 Sir Frederic Bennett Conservative
1987 Rupert Allason Conservative
1997 Adrian Sanders Liberal Democrat
2015 Kevin Foster Conservative

Elections

Elections in the 2010s

General election 2019: Torbay [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Kevin Foster 29,863 59.2 +6.2
Liberal Democrats Lee Howgate12,11424.0-1.1
Labour Michele Middleditch6,56213.0-5.2
Green Sam Moss1,2352.5+1.4
Independent James Channer6481.3N/A
Majority17,74935.2+7.3
Turnout 50,42267.2-0.2
Conservative hold Swing +3.65
General election 2017: Torbay [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Kevin Foster 27,141 53.0 +12.4
Liberal Democrats Deborah Brewer12,85825.1−8.7
Labour Paul Raybould9,31018.2+9.5
UKIP Tony McIntyre1,2132.4−11.2
Green Sam Moss6521.3−2.0
Majority14,28327.9+21.1
Turnout 51,17467.4+4.4
Conservative hold Swing Increase2.svg 10.6
General election 2015: Torbay [6] [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Kevin Foster 19,551 40.7 +2.0
Liberal Democrats Adrian Sanders 16,26533.8−13.2
UKIP Anthony McIntyre6,54013.6+8.3
Labour Su Maddock4,1668.7+2.1
Green Paula Hermes1,5573.2+2.2
Majority3,2866.9N/A
Turnout 48,07963.0−1.6
Conservative gain from Liberal Democrats Swing +7.6
General election 2010: Torbay [8] [9] [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democrats Adrian Sanders 23,126 47.0 +5.2
Conservative Marcus Wood19,04838.7+2.9
Labour David Pedrick-Friend3,2316.6−7.9
UKIP Julien Parrott2,6285.3−2.7
BNP Ann Conway7091.4N/A
Green Sam Moss4681.0N/A
Majority4,0788.3+4.0
Turnout 49,21064.6+4.4
Liberal Democrats hold Swing +1.1

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: Torbay [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democrats Adrian Sanders 19,31740.8−9.7
Conservative Marcus Wood17,28836.5+0.1
Labour David Pedrick-Friend6,97214.7+5.3
UKIP Graham Booth 3,7267.9+4.7
Majority2,0294.3-9.8
Turnout 47,30361.9−0.6
Liberal Democrats hold Swing −4.9
General election 2001: Torbay [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democrats Adrian Sanders 24,01550.5+10.9
Conservative Christian Sweeting17,30736.4−3.2
Labour John MacKay4,4849.4−5.4
UKIP Graham Booth 1,5123.2−0.5
Independent Pam Neale2510.5+0.5
Majority6,70814.1+14.0
Turnout 47,56962.5−11.3
Liberal Democrats hold Swing +7.05

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: Torbay [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democrats Adrian Sanders 21,09439.6−0.2
Conservative Rupert Allason 21,08239.5−10.4
Labour Michael Morey7,92314.9+5.3
UKIP Graham Booth 1,9623.7N/A
Liberal Bruce Cowling1,1612.2N/A
Rainbow Dream Ticket Paul Wild1000.2N/A
Majority120.1N/A
Turnout 53,32273.8-6.8
Liberal Democrats gain from Conservative Swing +5.1
General election 1992: Torbay [14] [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Rupert Allason 28,62449.9−4.1
Liberal Democrats Adrian Sanders 22,83739.8+2.2
Labour Peter Truscott 5,5039.6+1.2
National Front Robert Jones2680.5N/A
Natural Law Alison Thomas1570.3N/A
Majority5,78710.1−6.3
Turnout 57,38980.6+4.3
Conservative hold Swing −3.2

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1987: Torbay [16] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Rupert Allason 29,02954.0+1.2
Liberal Nicholas Bye 20,20937.6−1.6
Labour Gerald Taylor4,5388.4+1.2
Majority8,82016.4+3.0
Turnout 53,77676.4+3.8
Conservative hold Swing +1.4
General election 1983: Torbay [18] [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Frederic Bennett 25,72152.6−1.5
Liberal Michael Mitchell19,16639.2+16.1
Labour Philip Rackley3,5217.2−12.4
Independent Anne Murray5001.0+1.0
Majority6,55513.4-18.2
Turnout 48,90872.6−2.5
Conservative hold Swing +8.8

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1979: Torbay
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Frederic Bennett 36,09954.1+5.7
Liberal Michael Mitchell15,23123.1−5.4
Labour Elaine Fear12,91919.6−3.5
Ecology David Abrahams1,1611.8N/A
National Front June Spry6471.0N/A
Majority20,86831.0+11.1
Turnout 66,05775.1+2.2
Conservative hold Swing +5.5
General election October 1974: Torbay
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Frederic Bennett 30,20848.4−0.2
Liberal John Goss17,77028.5−1.9
Labour Jack Tench14,44123.1+2.0
Majority12,43819.9+1.7
Turnout 62,41972.9−7.4
Conservative hold Swing -1.05
General election February 1974: Torbay
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Frederic Bennett 33,16348.6N/A
Liberal Bridget Trethewey20,75530.4N/A
Labour Jack Tench14,38921.1N/A
Majority12,40818.2N/A
Turnout 68,30780.3N/A
Conservative win (new seat)

See also

Notes and references

Notes
  1. A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
References
  1. "Electorate Figures – Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  2. Unemployment claimants by constituency The Guardian
  3. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "T" (part 2)
  4. Council, Torbay. "Parliamentary elections". www.torbay.gov.uk. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  5. "2017 general election candidates in Devon". Devon Live. 11 May 2017. Archived from the original on 11 May 2017.
  6. "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  7. "Torbay - 2015 Election Results - General Elections Online". geo.digiminster.com. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  8. "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  9. "Statement of Persons Nominated and Notice of Poll: Torbay". Torbay Borough Council. 21 April 2010. Retrieved 25 April 2010.[ permanent dead link ]
  10. "BBC NEWS – Election 2010 – Torbay". BBC News.
  11. "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  12. "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  13. "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  14. "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  15. "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 6 December 2010.
  16. "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  17. "Politics Resources". Election 1987. Politics Resources. Retrieved 16 November 2011.
  18. "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  19. "Politics Resources". Election 1983. Politics Resources. Retrieved 16 November 2011.

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