Traffic guard

Last updated
Traffic guard
Traffic signal and Security guard P5292395.jpg
Japanese traffic guard
Occupation
NamesFlagger, Traffic Controller
Occupation type
Employment
Activity sectors
Traffic, law enforcement, security, civil engineering
Description
Related jobs
Construction worker, guard, police

A traffic guard, traffic controller, flagman, or flagger is a person who directs traffic through a construction site or other temporary traffic control zone past an area using gestures, signs or flags. The person directing traffic is responsible for maintaining the safety and efficiency of traffic, as well as the safety of road workers, while allowing construction, accident recovery or other tasks to proceed. Traffic guards are commonly used to control traffic when two way roads are reduced to one lane, and traffic must alternate. Their duties are to direct traffic to safer areas where construction or traffic incidents are taking place. In addition they have to moderate the traffic density to not cause traffic jams. They guide motorists to follow the traffic laws; but may not be able to enforce the law. Most traffic guards are seen as construction workers; but in some nations, they dress or perform as security guards and police officers.

Contents

Duties and careers

Highway and expressway safety

Traffic guards are employed on highways and expressways. They are trained to set up warning signs and barricades to slow down the speed of traffic in a temporary traffic control zone. Some areas have full-time traffic guard teams for responding to incidents that could risk the safety to motorists. When they are on scene they will set up equipment to warn approaching traffic about the incident.

Intersections

If construction or maintenance is occurring in an intersection and a law enforcement officer is not used to direct traffic, a traffic guard would control the intersection instead of the traffic light or signs.

Road construction
Flagger on M-124, Hayes State Park, Michigan Flagger on M-124.JPG
Flagger on M-124, Hayes State Park, Michigan

Traffic guards who are directing traffic during road construction often alternate opposing traffic through a single lane. One direction of traffic is stopped at a time.

Crossings

Traffic guard on Michigan Avenue in Chicago Chicago 2007-4.jpg
Traffic guard on Michigan Avenue in Chicago

Traffic guards who are stationed at a crossing with no signal or placed for extra safety at a junction. They stop pedestrians and vehicles from crossing a junction where another thing has the right of way to cross.

Parking and gate guard

These traffic guards are waiting for motorists to leave and enter a complex. They also help pedestrians cross or stop them in front of the complex's entrance. They act as second pair of eyes to keep motorists and pedestrians safe. They may direct street traffic to stop for exiting motorists from the complex and they may not allow in doing that.

Equipment

See also

Related Research Articles

Traffic Road users travelling by foot or vehicle

Traffic on roads consists of road users including pedestrians, ridden or herded animals, vehicles, streetcars, buses and other conveyances, either singly or together, while using the public way for purposes of travel.

Roundabout Traffic intersection

A roundabout is a type of circular intersection or junction in which road traffic is permitted to flow in one direction around a central island, and priority is typically given to traffic already in the junction.

Intersection (road) Road junction where two or more roads either meet or cross at grade

An intersection is an at-grade junction where two or more transport flows meet or cross. Intersections may be classified by number of road segments, traffic controls or lane design.

Zebra crossing

A zebra crossing is a type of pedestrian crossing used in many places around the world. Its distinguishing feature is that it gives priority to pedestrians; once someone has indicated their intent to cross by waiting by the crossing, motorists are obliged to stop. These were introduced to the UK in the 1930s as a road safety measure and were marked by a pair of striped poles, each supporting a flashing orange light, known as Belisha Beacons. In the 1940s road markings were added to the crossing design: These were alternating dark and light stripes on the road surface. These stripes, resembling the coat of a zebra, give rise to the common

Pedestrian crossing Place designated for pedestrians to cross a road, street or avenue

A pedestrian crossing or crosswalk is a place designated for pedestrians to cross a road, street or avenue. The term "pedestrian crossing" is also used in some international treaties that pertain to road traffic and road signs, such as the Vienna Convention on Road Traffic and the Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals.

Traffic light Signaling device to control competing flows of traffic

Traffic lights, traffic signals, stoplights or robots are signalling devices positioned at road intersections, pedestrian crossings, and other locations to control flows of traffic.

Jaywalking

Jaywalking occurs when a pedestrian walks in or crosses a roadway that has traffic, other than at a suitable crossing point, or otherwise in disregard of traffic rules. The term originated with jay-drivers, people who drove horse-drawn carriages and automobiles on the wrong side of the road, before taking its current meaning.

Traffic law in China is still in its nascent stage. Therefore, the rules of the road in China are understood to mean both the codified and uncodified practices, procedures and norms of behavior generally followed by motorists, cyclists and pedestrians in the mainland of China.

A crossing guard, lollipop man/lady, crosswalk attendant, or school road patrol is a traffic management personnel who is normally stationed on busy roadways to aid pedestrians. Often associated with elementary school children, crossing guards stop the flow of traffic so pedestrians may cross an intersection. Crossing guards are known by a variety of names, the most widely used in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Australia being "lollipop lady/man", a reference to the large signs used that resemble lollipops. The verb is lollipopping, which can also be used for road works.

Road signs in Sweden are regulated in Vägmärkesförordningen, VMF (2007:90), and are to be placed 2 metres from the road with the sign 1.6 m from the base for motorized roads. Except for route numbers, there are a maximum of three signs on a pole, with the most important sign at the top. All signs have a reflective layer added on selected parts of the sign as is custom in European countries; most larger signs also have their own illumination.

Road traffic control

Road traffic control involves directing vehicular and pedestrian traffic around a construction zone, accident or other road disruption, thus ensuring the safety of emergency response teams, construction workers and the general public.

Road signs in Singapore closely follow those laid down in the traffic sign regulations used in the United Kingdom, although a number of changes over the years have introduced some slight deviations that suit local road conditions. Road signs in Singapore conform to the local Highway Code under the authority of the Singapore Traffic Police.

Traffic-light signalling and operation

The use of traffic lights to control the movement of traffic differs regionally and internationally in certain respects. This article describes some of these non-universal features. Note that the color phase commonly known as "yellow" is often referred to, especially in official usage, as "amber"; for consistency this article uses "yellow" throughout.

All-way stop

An all-way stop – also known as a four-way stop – is a traffic management system which requires vehicles on all the approaches to a road intersection to stop at the intersection before proceeding through it. Designed for use at low traffic-volume locations, the arrangement is common in the United States, Canada, South Africa, Liberia, and Mexico, as well as in a number of, usually rural, locations in Australia where visibility on the junction approaches is particularly poor. The stop signs at such intersections may be supplemented with additional plates stating the number of approaches.

Road signs in the United States Road / traffic signs utilized in the United States

In the United States, road signs are, for the most part, standardized by federal regulations, most notably in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) and its companion volume the Standard Highway Signs (SHS).

The road signs in Poland follow the Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals and, therefore, are more or less identical to those in other European countries. Warning signs have yellow background rather than the more common black-on-white design, and therefore similar to the road signs in Greece.

Road signs in South Korea are regulated by the Korean Road Traffic Authority.

Road traffic control devices are markers, signs and signal devices used to inform, guide and control traffic, including pedestrians, motor vehicle drivers and bicyclists. These devices are usually placed adjacent, over or along the highways, roads, traffic facilities and other public areas that require traffic control.

Glossary of road transport terms Wikipedia glossary

Terminology related to road transport—the transport of passengers or goods on paved routes between places—is diverse, with variation between dialects of English. There may also be regional differences within a single country, and some terms differ based on the side of the road traffic drives on. This glossary is an alphabetical listing of road transport terms.

Road signs in the Philippines Wikimedia list article

Road signs in the Philippines are regulated and standardized by the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH). Most of the signs reflects minor influences from American and Australian signs, but keeps close to the Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals as an original signatory.