UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

Last updated
UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship
UEFA U-19 Women's European Championship.svg
Founded 1997
Region Europe (UEFA)
Number of teams Maximum of 54 (qualifying round)
24 (elite round)
8 (finals)
Current championsFlag of Spain.svg  Spain (3rd title)
Most successful team(s)Flag of Germany.svg  Germany (6 titles)
Soccerball current event.svg 2019 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship qualification

The UEFA European Women's Under-19 Championship is a competition in women's football for European national teams of players under 19 years of age. National under-19 teams whose countries belong to the European governing body UEFA can register to enter the competition.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, also commonly known as women's football or women's soccer is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

Contents

In odd years the tournament is also a FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup qualifying competition. The tournament began in the 1997–98 season as an under-18 event and became an under-19s event from the 2001–02 season, it is held yearly. [1] The Championship has 3 phases: the qualifying phase open to all eligible nations, the elite phase featuring the group winners and runners-up from the qualifying phase, and the finals phase which is composed of 8 qualifying teams. The finals themselves are composed of two groups of four teams; each team plays the others in the group. The winner of each group after the 3 matches plays the runner-up of the opposing group in a semi-final, with the winner contesting the final.

The FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup is an international association football tournament, organized by FIFA, for national teams of women under the age of 20. The tournament is held in even-numbered years. It was first conducted in 2002 as the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship with an upper age limit of 19. In 2006, the age limit was raised to the current 20. The event was renamed as a World Cup effective with the 2008 competition, making its name consistent with FIFA's other worldwide competitions for national teams.

Finals format

Since 2002 the finals had eight teams with two groups of four teams, semi-finals and the final.

Results

All finals so far. [2]

YearHostWinnerScoreRunner-upLosing Semi-Finalists
1998
Details
Two-legged final Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
2–0 / 2–3Flag of France.svg
France
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany and Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
YearHostWinnerScoreRunner-upThird placeScoreFourth place
1999
Details
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Round-robin Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
Round-robin Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
2000
Details
Flag of France.svg  France Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
4–2Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Round-robin Flag of France.svg
France
2001
Details
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
3–2Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
1–0Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
YearHostWinnerScoreRunner-upLosing Semi-Finalists
2002
Details
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
3–1Flag of France.svg
France
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark and Flag of England.svg  England
2003
Details
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Flag of France.svg
France
2–0Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of England.svg  England and Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
2004
Details
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
2–1Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg  Italy and Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
2005
Details
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
2–2
6–5 (pen.)
Flag of France.svg
France
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland and Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2006
Details
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
3–0Flag of France.svg
France
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark and Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
2007
Details
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
2–0( a.e.t. )Flag of England.svg
England
Flag of France.svg  France and Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
2008
Details
Flag of France.svg  France Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
1–0Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany and Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
2009
Details
Flag of Belarus (1995-2012).svg  Belarus Flag of England.svg
England
2–0Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Flag of France.svg  France and Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
2010
Details
Flag of Macedonia.svg  Macedonia Flag of France.svg
France
2–1Flag of England.svg
England
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany and Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
2011
Details
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
8–1Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy and Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
2012
Details
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
1–0( a.e.t. )Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark and Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal
2013
Details
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales Flag of France.svg
France
2–0( a.e.t. )Flag of England.svg
England
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland and Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2014
Details
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
1–0Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway and Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland
2015
Details
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
3–1Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of France.svg  France and Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2016
Details
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia Flag of France.svg
France
2–1Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands and Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
2017
Details
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
3–2Flag of France.svg
France
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands and Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2018
Details
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
1–0Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway and Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
2019
Details
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
2020
Details
Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia

Winners

CountryWinnersRunners-upThird PlaceFourth PlaceSemi-FinalistsTotal (Top Four)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 6 (2000, 2001, 2002, 2006, 2007, 2011)3 (1999, 2004, 2018)7 (1998, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2013, 2015, 2017)15
Flag of France.svg  France 4 (2003, 2010, 2013, 2016)5 (1998, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2017)1 (2000)3 (2007, 2009, 2015)13
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 3 (2004, 2017, 2018)5 (2000, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016)1 (2001)9
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 3 (1999, 2012, 2015)1 (2009)1 (2000)3 (1998, 2003, 2008)8
Flag of England.svg  England 1 (2009)3 (2007, 2010, 2013)2 (2002, 2003)6
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1 (1998)1 (2001)3 (2002, 2006, 2012)5
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1 (2008)1 (1999)2 (2004, 2011)4
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 1 (2005)2 (2004, 2006)3
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1 (2014)3 (2010, 2016, 2017)4
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 4 (2001, 2003, 2008, 2011)1 (1999)2 (2007, 2014)6
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 2 (2005, 2013)2
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 3 (2009, 2011, 2016)2
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 1 (2012)1
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 1 (2014)1
Total2020333480

Comprehensive team results by tournament

Legend

For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team 2002
Flag of Sweden.svg
(8)
2003
Flag of Germany.svg
(8)
2004
Flag of Finland.svg
(8)
2005
Flag of Hungary.svg
(8)
2006
Flag of Switzerland.svg
(8)
2007
Flag of Iceland.svg
(8)
2008
Flag of France.svg
(8)
2009
Flag of Belarus.svg
(8)
2010
Flag of Macedonia.svg
(8)
2011
Flag of Italy.svg
(8)
2012
Flag of Turkey.svg
(8)
2013
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg
(8)
2014
Flag of Norway.svg
(8)
2015
Flag of Israel.svg
(8)
2016
Flag of Slovakia.svg
(8)
2017
Ulster Banner.svg
(8)
2018
Flag of Switzerland.svg
(8)
2019
Flag of Scotland.svg
(8)
2020
Flag of Georgia.svg
(8)
Total
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus GS1
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium GSGS2
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark SFSFGSSF4
Flag of England.svg  England SFSFGS2ndGS1st2ndGS8
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland GSSF2
Flag of France.svg  France 2nd1stGS2nd2ndSFGSSF1st9
Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia qX
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1stGS2ndSF1st1stSFGSSF1st10
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary GS1
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland GSGS2
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel qX
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy GSSF1stGSGS5
Flag of Macedonia.svg  Macedonia GS1
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands GSGSSFGS4
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland qX
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway GS2ndGSSF2ndGS2ndq7
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland GS1
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal SF1
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania GS1
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia SF1stSFGS4
Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia GS1
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland GSGSGSq3
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia qX
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain GSGS1stGSGSGSGS2nd8
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden GSSFGSSF2nd1st6
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland GSGS5thGSSFGSq6
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey GS1
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales qX

Since 2002, the 3rd/4th-place match has not been played.

Tournament statistics

Top scorers by tournament

YearPlayerGoals
2002 Flag of France.svg Claire Morel
Flag of Germany.svg Barbara Müller
4
2003 Flag of Germany.svg Shelley Thompson 4
2004 Flag of Germany.svg Anja Mittag 6
2005 Flag of Russia.svg Elena Danilova 9
2006 Flag of Russia.svg Elena Danilova 7
2007 Flag of France.svg Marie-Laure Delie
Flag of Iceland.svg Fanndís Friðriksdóttir
Flag of England.svg Ellen White
3
2008 Flag of Germany.svg Marie Pollmann 4
2009 Flag of Sweden.svg Sofia Jakobsson 5
2010 Flag of Germany.svg Turid Knaak
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Lieke Martens
4
2011 Flag of Norway.svg Melissa Bjånesøy 7
2012 Flag of Sweden.svg Elin Rubensson 5
2013 Flag of Germany.svg Pauline Bremer 6
2014 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Vivianne Miedema 6
2015 Flag of Sweden.svg Stina Blackstenius 6
2016 Flag of France.svg Marie-Antoinette Katoto 6
2017 Flag of Spain.svg Patricia Guijarro 5

Golden Player by tournament

Since the 2002 edition, the Golden Player Award has been given to the most valuable player of the tournament. [3]

YearPlayer
2002 Flag of Germany.svg Viola Odebrecht
2003 Flag of France.svg Sarah Bouhaddi
2004 Flag of Germany.svg Anja Mittag
2005 Flag of Russia.svg Elena Danilova
2006 Flag of Germany.svg Isabel & Monique Kerschowski
2007 Flag of England.svg Fern Whelan
2008 Flag of Italy.svg Sara Gama
2009 Flag of Switzerland.svg Ramona Bachmann
2010 Flag of Macedonia.svg Nataša Andonova
2011 Flag of Germany.svg Ramona Petzelberger
2012 Flag of Sweden.svg Elin Rubensson
2013 Flag of France.svg Sandie Toletti
2014 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Vivianne Miedema
2015 Flag of Sweden.svg Stina Blackstenius
2016 Flag of France.svg Marie-Antoinette Katoto
2017 Flag of Spain.svg Patricia Guijarro

See also

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

The FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup is an international association football tournament for female players under the age of 17. It is organized by Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). The tournament is held in even-numbered years, starting in 2008.

UEFA Womens Under-17 Championship U17-womens national team association football tournament

The UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship is a European championship football tournament, organized by UEFA, for national teams of women under age seventeen. The tournament was first played out in 2007–08, having been approved by the UEFA Executive Committee on 22 May 2006. It is also a FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup qualifying competition in even years. National under-17 teams whose countries belong to the European governing body UEFA can register to enter the competition. Germany is the most successful team in this competition, having won six titles. Spain are the current champions.

Related Research Articles

UEFA European Championship European association football tournament for mens national teams

The UEFA European Championship is the primary association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), determining the continental champion of Europe. Held every four years since 1960, in the even-numbered year between World Cup tournaments, it was originally called the UEFA European Nations' Cup, changing to the current name in 1968. Starting with the 1996 tournament, specific championships are often referred to in the form "UEFA Euro [year]"; this format has since been retroactively applied to earlier tournaments.

The FIFA U-17 World Cup, founded as the FIFA U-16 World Championship, later changed to its current name in 2007, is the world championship of association football for male players under the age of 17 organized by Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA).

In European football, the UEFA coefficients are statistics used for ranking and seeding teams in club and international competitions. Introduced in 1979, the coefficients are calculated by UEFA, who administer football within Europe.

UEFA Womens Champions League European association football tournament for clubs

The UEFA Women's Champions League, previously called the UEFA Women's Cup (2001–09), is an international women's association football competition. It involves the top club teams from countries affiliated with the European governing body UEFA.

UEFA European Under-19 Championship European association football tournament for under-19 national teams

The UEFA European Under-19 Championship is an annual football competition for men organised by the sport's European governing body, UEFA.

UEFA European Under-17 Championship

The UEFA European Under-17 Championship is an annual European association football competition contested by the men's under-17 national teams of the member associations of UEFA.

Sarah Bouhaddi Association footballer

Sarah Bouhaddi is a French football player currently playing for Olympique Lyon of the Division 1 Féminine. Bouhaddi plays as a goalkeeper and is a member of the France women's national football team having made her debut in 2004. Before suffering an injury to her ACL in 2009, she was France's number one goalkeeper, however in 2011, she re-captured the position ahead of the 2012 Summer Olympics.

2015 UEFA European Under-17 Championship

The 2015 UEFA European Under-17 Championship was the 14th edition of the UEFA European Under-17 Championship, the annual European youth football competition contested by the men's under-17 national teams of the member associations of UEFA. Bulgaria hosted the tournament. The finals featured 16 teams for the first time since 2002, as the number of teams was increased from eight in the previous tournament. Players born on or after 1 January 1998 were eligible to participate in this competition.

2016 UEFA European Under-19 Championship

The 2016 UEFA European Under-19 Championship was the 15th edition of the UEFA European Under-19 Championship, the annual European international youth football championship contested by the men's under-19 national teams of UEFA member associations. Germany, which were selected by UEFA on 20 March 2012, hosted the tournament between 11 and 24 July 2016.

The 2016 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship was the 9th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship, the annual European international youth football championship contested by the women's under-17 national teams of UEFA member associations. Belarus, which were selected by UEFA on 20 March 2012, hosted the tournament between 4 and 16 May 2016.

The 2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship was the 14th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship, the annual European youth football competition contested by the women's under-19 national teams of the member associations of UEFA. Israel hosted the tournament. Players born on or after 1 January 1996 were eligible to participate in this competition.

The 2018 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship was the 11th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship, the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the women's under-17 national teams of Europe. Lithuania, which were selected by UEFA on 26 January 2015, hosted the tournament.

2017 UEFA Womens Under-19 Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship was the 16th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship, the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the women's under-19 national teams of Europe. Northern Ireland was selected by UEFA on 26 January 2015 as the host country for the tournament.

2018 UEFA European Under-19 Championship

The 2018 UEFA European Under-19 Championship was the 17th edition of the UEFA European Under-19 Championship, the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the men's under-19 national teams of Europe. Finland hosted the final tournament, between 16 and 29 July, after being selected by UEFA on 26 January 2015. A total of eight teams competed in the tournament, with players born on or after 1 January 1999 eligible to participate.

2019 UEFA European Under-21 Championship

The 2019 UEFA European Under-21 Championship will be the 22nd edition of the UEFA European Under-21 Championship, the biennial international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the men's under-21 national teams of Europe. The final tournament will be hosted by Italy in mid-2019, after their bid was selected by the UEFA Executive Committee on 9 December 2016 in Nyon, Switzerland.

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process decided all 24 teams which will play in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the hosts France qualifying automatically. It will be the eighth FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament will be the third to be hosted in Europe, after the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden and the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany.

The European qualifying competition for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was a women's football competition that determined the eight UEFA teams joining the automatically qualified hosts France in the final tournament.

The 2019 UEFA European Under-17 Championship will be the 18th edition of the UEFA European Under-17 Championship, the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the men's under-17 national teams of Europe. The Republic of Ireland, which were selected by UEFA on 9 December 2016, will host the tournament.

The 2019 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship will be the 18th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship, the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the women's under-19 national teams of Europe. Scotland, which were selected by UEFA on 9 December 2016, will host the tournament.

References

  1. "History of the competition". UEFA. Retrieved 6 June 2011.
  2. "European Women's U-18/U-19 Championship". RSSSF. Retrieved 27 March 2014.
  3. History