Welsh Judo Association

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Welsh Judo Association
Cymdeithas Judo Cymru
Judo Cymrulogo.jpg
Sport Judo
Jurisdiction National
AbbreviationWJA
AffiliationBritish Judo Association
HeadquartersThe National Judo Centre, Sport Wales National Centre
Location Sophia Gardens, Cardiff
ChairmanFrederick Prosser
CEO Darren Warner
CoachCraig Fallon
Official website
www.welshjudo.com
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg

The Welsh Judo Association (Welsh : Cymdeithas Judo Cymru) (WJA) is the governing body for the sport of judo in Wales. [1] The WJA has 80 affiliated clubs and over 2,400 members. [2] It is responsible for managing the Welsh Performance Squads the National Coach selects the Welsh national team to compete in international events. Double judo Olympic silver medallist Neil Adams is a former WJA National Coach. [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

Welsh language Brythonic language spoken natively in Wales

Welsh ; [kəmˈrɑːɨɡ](listen)) or y Gymraeg is a Brittonic language of the Celtic branch of the Indo-European language family. It is spoken natively in Wales, by some in England, and in Y Wladfa. Historically, it has also been known in English as 'British', 'Cambrian', 'Cambric' and 'Cymric'.

Judo modern martial art, combat and Olympic sport

Judo was originally created in 1882 by Jigoro Kano (嘉納治五郎) as a physical, mental, and moral pedagogy in Japan. It is generally categorized as a modern martial art, which later evolved into a combat and Olympic sport. Its most prominent feature is its competitive element, where the objective is to either throw or take down an opponent to the ground, immobilize or otherwise subdue an opponent with a pin, or force an opponent to submit with a joint lock or a choke. Strikes and thrusts by hands and feet as well as weapons defences are a part of judo, but only in pre-arranged forms and are not allowed in judo competition or free practice. A judo practitioner is called a judoka.

Wales Country in northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

Sport Wales National Centre, home of the Welsh Judo Association Welsh Institute of Sport, Cardiff - entrance.JPG
Sport Wales National Centre, home of the Welsh Judo Association

Fred Prosser has been the WJA chairman since 2014. [7]

A purpose built GBP1.1m dojo opened at the Institute in October 2009 to house the WJA, allowing the full-time tutorage of promising athletes. [8] [9]

<i>Dojo</i> Japanese term for formal training hall of any martial arts

A dōjō (道場) is a hall or space for immersive learning or meditation. This is traditionally in the field of martial arts, but has been seen increasingly in other fields, such as meditation and software development. The term literally means "place of the Way" in Japanese.

Natalie Powell was the first athlete from the National Judo Centre to qualify for the Olympic Games. Natalie Powell made it to the quarter-finals of the -78 kg women at Rio Olympics 2016.

The Welsh Judo Association is based at the Sport Wales National Centre, Sophia Gardens, Cardiff, as is the Welsh Judo Association Academy. [8] [10]

Sport Wales National Centre sports venue

The Sport Wales National Centre is a sports facility in Cardiff, Wales, set up to assist the development of elite athletes in Wales. The Centre, owned and operated by Sport Wales, was established by the then Sports Council for Wales in 1971 as the National Sports Centre for Wales. Renamed the Welsh Institute of Sport in 1994, it has been known as the Sport Wales National Centre since April 2010.

Sophia Gardens park in Cardiff, Wales

Sophia Gardens is a large public park in Riverside, Cardiff, Wales, on the west bank of the River Taff. International test cricket matches and county cricket matches are held in the Sophia Gardens cricket ground, the home of Glamorgan County Cricket Club.

Cardiff Capital and largest city of Wales

Cardiff is the capital of Wales and its largest city. The eleventh-largest city in the United Kingdom, it is Wales's chief commercial centre, the base for most national cultural institutions and Welsh media, and the seat of the National Assembly for Wales. At the 2011 census, the unitary authority area population was estimated to be 346,090, and the wider urban area 479,000. Cardiff is a significant tourist centre and the most popular visitor destination in Wales with 21.3 million visitors in 2017. In 2011, Cardiff was ranked sixth in the world in National Geographic's alternative tourist destinations.

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References

  1. "Governing Bodies of Sport-Sports Council for Wales". Sport Wales Chwaraeon Cymru website. Sport Wales. 2007. Archived from the original on 15 October 2008. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  2. 1 2 "Latest version of the WJA Strategic Plan" (Word). Welsh Judo Association website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  3. "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  4. "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  5. "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  6. "Raise Your Game - Lessons from the legends - Neil Adams". BBC Cymru Wales website. BBC Wales. 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  7. "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association website. Welsh Judo Association. 1 October 2008. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  8. 1 2 "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009.
  9. "WalesOnline:Sports:Sports News:Judo: Welsh judo throws itself into Games challenge". WalesOnline website. Media Wales. 30 October 2009. Retrieved 11 April 2010.
  10. "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009.