1991 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament

Last updated
1991 NCAA Division I
Women's Basketball Tournament
1991WomensFinalFourLogo.jpg
Teams48
Finals site Lakefront Arena
New Orleans, Louisiana
Champions Tennessee Volunteers (3rd title)
Runner-up Virginia Cavaliers (1st title game)
Semifinalists
MOP Dawn Staley (Virginia)
NCAA Division I Women's Tournaments
« 1990 1992 »

The 1991 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 13 and ended on March 31. The tournament featured 48 teams. The Final Four event was hosted by the University of New Orleans, and held at the Lakefront Arena in New Orleans. [1] The Final Four teams consisted of Tennessee, Stanford, Connecticut, and Virginia, with Tennessee defeating Virginia 70-67 (OT) to win its third NCAA title. [2] Virginia's Dawn Staley was named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament. [3]

Contents

This tournament was the first to adopt the FIBA's 10ths-second clock during the final minute of each period, unlike whole seconds as in past seasons. One exception is Lakefront Arena, which was an AS&I scoreboard and wasn't modified until summer 1991.

Notable events

James Madison earned an 8 seed and beat the 9 seed, Kentucky in a first round match-up. This set up a game between the Dukes, and the number 1 seed in the East Regional Penn State, with the game played on the Penn State home court. The game started out in favor of the home team, as they scored the first eleven points of the game, forcing JMU coach Sheila Moorman to call a timeout. The lead extended, with the Nittany Lions pulling out to a 24–9. The coach decided to stress defense and it helped, but Penn State held a 41–29 lead at halftime. The team continued to stress defense in the second half, and the Dukes held Penn State to six points in the first eight minutes of the second half. The Dukes took a lead, and were up by four points with under twelve minutes to go. Penn State cut the lead to two points, and with 19 seconds to go attempted a three-point shot for the win, but the shot was blocked, and JMU would upset the top seed. It was only the second time in the ten-year history of the NCAA tournament that a number 1 seed had failed to advance to the regional. Coincidentally, first time was in 1986 when number 1 seeded Virginia failed to reach the regional when they were defeated by James Madison. [4]

10th seeded Vanderbilt upset 7th seeded South Carolina, then went on to defeat the second seeded Purdue 69–63, to advance to the regional, where they would lose to Auburn. 10th seeded Lamar upset 7th seeded Texas, then went on to a 20-point victory over second seeded LSU. Oklahoma State faced Michigan State in a game that would go to three overtimes. Oklahoma State won 96–94.

Connecticut defeated Clemson in the Regional final to earn their first trip to a Final Four. There they would take on one seeded Virginia. Connecticut's coach, Geno Auriemma started his women's basketball college coaching career as an assistant coach under Debbie Ryan at Virginia. In a game identified in 2009 as one of the top ten games in UConn history, Tonya Cardoza scored 16 points for the Cavaliers, including four three throws in the final second to help Virginia defeat Connecticut 61–55. Tonya Cardoza would go on to become an assistant coach at Connecticut for many years. [5]

In the other semifinal game, Tennessee defeated Stanford 68–60 to advance to the championship game against Virginia. The Cavaliers would lead by five points with under two minutes to go, but Tennessee's Dena Head scored, was fouled, and converted the free throw to cut the margin to two points. Virginia failed to score, then fouled Head with seconds to go, who sank the free throws to send the game to overtime. Head continued to hit free throws in overtime, and the Volunteers went on to win the game and the national championship 70–67. [6]

Qualifying teams – automatic

Forty-eight teams were selected to participate in the 1991 NCAA Tournament. Twenty-one conferences were eligible for an automatic bid to the 1991 NCAA tournament. [7]

Automatic bids
  Record 
Qualifying schoolConferenceRegular
Season
ConferenceSeed
Appalachian State University Southern Conference 19–135–512
University of Arkansas at Little Rock Southwest 27–315–13
University of Connecticut Big East 26–414–23
DePaul University North Star Conference 19–1111–312
Florida State University Metro 24–612–25
California State University, Long Beach Big West Conference 23–715–34
Louisiana Tech University American South 18–119–310
Louisiana State University SEC 24–65–42
Southwest Missouri State University Gateway 25–416–28
University of Montana Big Sky Conference 26–316–011
North Carolina State University ACC 26–59–52
Oklahoma State University–Stillwater Big Eight 25–511–35
Pennsylvania State University Atlantic 10 29–117–11
Purdue University Big Ten 26–217–12
University of Richmond Colonial 26–411–17
Stanford University Pac-10 23–516–22
Stephen F. Austin State University Southland 25–414–08
Tennessee Technological University Ohio Valley Conference 22–711–19
University of Toledo MAC 23–613–311
University of Utah WAC 20–99–312
Western Kentucky University Sun Belt Conference 28–26–04

Qualifying teams – at-large

Twenty-seven additional teams were selected to complete the forty-eight invitations. [7]

At-large bids
  Record 
Qualifying schoolConferenceRegular
Season
ConferenceSeed
Auburn University Southeastern24–57–23
California State University, Fullerton Big West24–714–47
Clemson University Atlantic Coast20–108–64
Fairfield University Metro Atlantic25–515–112
The George Washington University Atlantic 1022–615–310
University of Georgia Southeastern26–39–01
College of the Holy Cross Patriot24–512–011
University of Iowa Big Ten20–813–56
James Madison University Colonial24–411–18
University of Kentucky Southeastern20–84–59
Lamar University American South26–312–010
University of Maryland, College Park Atlantic Coast17–129–56
Michigan State University Big Ten21–713–54
University of Mississippi Southeastern20–84–59
Northwestern University Big Ten20–812–66
Providence College Big East25–513–35
Rutgers University Atlantic 1023–615–36
University of South Carolina Metro22–812–27
University of Southern California Pacific-1017–1111–75
University of Tennessee Southeastern25–56–31
University of Texas at Austin Southwest21–814–27
Texas Tech University Southwest23–712–49
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Big West24–615–38
Vanderbilt University Southeastern17–114–510
University of Virginia Atlantic Coast27–214–01
University of Washington Pacific-1023–415–33
Washington State University Pacific-1018–1010–811

Bids by conference

Twenty-one conferences earned an automatic bid. In ten cases, the automatic bid was the only representative from the conference. Two conferences, Metro Atlantic and Patriot sent a single representative as an at-large team. Twenty-five additional at-large teams were selected from ten of the conferences. [7]

BidsConferenceTeams
7Southeastern LSU, Auburn, Georgia, Kentucky, Ole Miss, Tennessee, Vanderbilt
4Atlantic Coast North Carolina St., Clemson, Maryland, Virginia
4Big Ten Purdue, Iowa, Michigan St., Northwestern
4Pacific-10 Stanford, Southern California, Washington, Washington St.
3Atlantic 10 Penn St., George Washington, Rutgers
3Big West Long Beach St., Cal St. Fullerton, UNLV
3Southwest Arkansas, Texas, Texas Tech
2American South Louisiana Tech, Lamar
2Big East Connecticut, Providence
2Colonial Richmond, James Madison
2Metro Florida St., South Carolina
1Big Eight Oklahoma St.
1Big Sky Montana
1Metro Atlantic Fairfield
1Mid-American Toledo
1Missouri Valley Missouri St.
1North Star DePaul
1Ohio Valley Tennessee Tech
1Patriot Holy Cross
1Southern Appalachian St.
1Southland Stephen F. Austin
1Sun Belt Western Ky.
1Western Athletic Utah

First and second rounds

Usa edcp location map.svg
Green pog.svg
Providence
Green pog.svg
Piscataway
Green pog.svg
Harrisonburg
Green pog.svg
Richmond
Green pog.svg
Tallahassee
Green pog.svg
Nashville
Green pog.svg
Springfield
Green pog.svg
Worcester
Green pog.svg
Evanston
Green pog.svg
Stillwater
Green pog.svg
Nacogdoches
Green pog.svg
Austin
Green pog.svg
Missoula
Green pog.svg
Las Vegas
Green pog.svg
Los Angeles
Green pog.svg
Fullerton
1991 NCAA first round
Usa edcp location map.svg
Purple pog.svg
Clemson
Purple pog.svg
Storrs
Purple pog.svg
University Park
Purple pog.svg
Raleigh
Purple pog.svg
West Lafayette
Purple pog.svg
Bowling Green
Purple pog.svg
Knoxville
Purple pog.svg
Auburn
Purple pog.svg
Stillwater
Purple pog.svg
Charlottesville
Purple pog.svg
Beaumont
Purple pog.svg
Fayetteville
Purple pog.svg
Stanford
Purple pog.svg
Athens
Purple pog.svg
Seattle
Purple pog.svg
Long Beach
1991 NCAA second round

In 1991, the field remained at 48 teams. The teams were seeded, and assigned to four geographic regions, with seeds 1-12 in each region. In Round 1, seeds 8 and 9 faced each other for the opportunity to face the 1 seed in the second round, seeds 7 and 10 played for the opportunity to face the 2 seed, seeds 5 and 12 played for the opportunity to face the 4 seed, and seeds 6 and 11 played for the opportunity to face the 3 seed. In the first two rounds, the higher seed was given the opportunity to host the first-round game. In most cases, the higher seed accepted the opportunity. The exceptions: [8]

The following table lists the region, host school, venue and the thirty-two first and second round locations:

RegionRndHostVenueCityState
East 1 Providence College Alumni Hall (Providence) Providence Rhode Island
East 1 Rutgers University Louis Brown Athletic Center Piscataway New Jersey
East 1 James Madison University James Madison University Convocation Center Harrisonburg Virginia
East 1 University of Richmond Robins Center Richmond Virginia
East 2 Clemson University Littlejohn Coliseum Clemson South Carolina
East 2 University of Connecticut Harry A. Gampel Pavilion Storrs Connecticut
East 2 Pennsylvania State University Recreation Building (Rec Hall) University Park Pennsylvania
East 2 North Carolina State University Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
Mideast 1 Florida State University Tully Gymnasium Tallahassee Florida
Mideast 1 Vanderbilt University Memorial Gymnasium (Vanderbilt University) Nashville Tennessee
Mideast 1 Southwest Missouri State University Hammons Student Center Springfield Missouri
Mideast 1 Holy Cross Hart Center Worcester Massachusetts
Mideast 2 Purdue University Mackey Arena West Lafayette Indiana
Mideast 2 Western Kentucky University E.A. Diddle Arena Bowling Green Kentucky
Mideast 2 University of Tennessee Thompson-Boling Arena Knoxville Tennessee
Mideast 2 Auburn University Memorial Coliseum (Beard–Eaves–Memorial Coliseum) Auburn Alabama
Midwest 1 Northwestern University Welsh-Ryan Arena Evanston Illinois
Midwest 1 Oklahoma State University Gallagher-Iba Arena Stillwater Oklahoma
Midwest 1 Stephen F. Austin University William R. Johnson Coliseum Nacogdoches Texas
Midwest 1 University of Texas Frank Erwin Center Austin Texas
Midwest 2 Oklahoma State University Gallagher-Iba Arena Stillwater Oklahoma
Midwest 2 University of Virginia University Hall (University of Virginia) Charlottesville Virginia
Midwest 2 Lamar University Montagne Center Beaumont Texas
Midwest 2 University of Arkansas Barnhill Arena Fayetteville Arkansas
West 1 University of Montana Dahlberg Arena Missoula Montana
West 1 University of Nevada, Las Vegas Thomas and Mack Center Paradise Nevada
West 1 University of Southern California Lyon Center Los Angeles California
West 1 California State University, Fullerton Titan Gym Fullerton California
West 2 Stanford University Maples Pavilion Stanford California
West 2 University of Georgia Georgia Coliseum (Stegeman Coliseum) Athens Georgia
West 2 University of Washington Hec Edmundson Pavilion Seattle Washington
West 2 Long Beach State University Gym (Gold Mine) Long Beach California

Regionals and Final Four

Usa edcp location map.svg
Blue pog.svg
Philadelphia
Blue pog.svg
Knoxville
Blue pog.svg
Austin
Blue pog.svg
Las Vegas
Red pog.svg
New Orleans
1991 NCAA regionals and Final Four

The Regionals, named for the general location, were held from March 22 to March 24 at these sites:

Each regional winner advanced to the Final Four, held March 30 and March 31 in New Orleans, Louisiana at the Lakefront Arena, co-hosted by University of New Orleans & Tulane University.

Bids by state

The forty-eight teams came from thirty states, plus Washington, D.C. California and Texas had the most teams with four each. Twenty states did not have any teams receiving bids. [7]

NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1991 NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1991.svg
NCAA Women's basketball Tournament invitations by state 1991
BidsStateTeams
4 California Long Beach St., Stanford, Cal St. Fullerton, Southern California
4 Texas Stephen F. Austin, Lamar, Texas, Texas Tech
3 Tennessee Tennessee Tech, Tennessee, Vanderbilt
3 Virginia Richmond, James Madison, Virginia
2 Connecticut Connecticut, Fairfield
2 Illinois DePaul, Northwestern
2 Kentucky Western Ky., Kentucky
2 Louisiana Louisiana Tech, LSU
2 North Carolina Appalachian St., North Carolina St.
2 South Carolina Clemson, South Carolina
2 Washington Washington, Washington St.
1 Alabama Auburn
1 Arkansas Arkansas
1 District of Columbia George Washington
1 Florida Florida St.
1 Georgia Georgia
1 Indiana Purdue
1 Iowa Iowa
1 Maryland Maryland
1 Massachusetts Holy Cross
1 Michigan Michigan St.
1 Mississippi Ole Miss
1 Missouri Missouri St.
1 Montana Montana
1 Nevada UNLV
1 New Jersey Rutgers
1 Ohio Toledo
1 Oklahoma Oklahoma St.
1 Pennsylvania Penn St.
1 Rhode Island Providence
1 Utah Utah

Brackets

First and second-round games played at higher seed except where noted.

Mideast regional – Knoxville, TN

First round
March 13
Second round
March 16–17
Regional semifinals
March 21
Regional finals
March 23
            
1 Tennessee 55
8 Missouri St. 47
8 Missouri St. 94
9 Tennessee Tech 64
1 Tennessee68
4 Western Kentucky 61
4 Western Kentucky 72
5 Florida St. 69
5 Florida St. 96
12 Appalachian St. 57
1 Tennessee69
3 Auburn 65
2 Purdue 63
10 Vanderbilt 69
7 South Carolina 64
10 at Vanderbilt 73
10 Vanderbilt 45
3 Auburn58
3 Auburn 84
11 Holy Cross 58
6 Maryland 74
11 at Holy Cross 81

West regional – Las Vegas, NV

First round
March 13
Second round
March 16–17
Regional semifinals
March 21
Regional finals
March 23
            
1 Georgia 86
8 UNLV 62
8 UNLV 70
9 Texas Tech 65
1 Georgia87
4 Long Beach St. 77
4 Long Beach St. 83
5 Southern California 58
5 Southern California 63
12 Utah 52
1 Georgia 67
2 Stanford75
2 Stanford 91
7 Cal St. Fullerton 67
7 Cal St. Fullerton 84
10 Louisiana Tech 80
2 Stanford73
3 Washington 47
3 Washington 70
6 Iowa 53
6 Iowa 64
11 at Montana 53

East regional – Philadelphia, PA

First round
March 13
Second round
March 16–17
Regional semifinals
March 21
Regional finals
March 23
            
1 Penn State 71
8 James Madison 73
8 James Madison 70
9 Kentucky 62
8 James Madison 55
4 Clemson57
4 Clemson 103
5 Providence 91
5 Providence 88
12 Fairfield 87
4 Clemson 57
3 Connecticut60
2 North Carolina St. 94
10 George Washington 83
7 Richmond 62
10 George Washington 73
2 North Carolina St. 71
3 Connecticut82
3 Connecticut 81
11 Toledo 80
6 Rutgers 65
11 Toledo 83

Midwest regional – Austin, Texas

First round
March 13
Second round
March 16–17
Regional semifinals
March 21
Regional finals
March 23
            
1 Virginia 74
8 Stephen F. Austin 72
8 Stephen F. Austin 73
9 Ole Miss 62
1 Virginia76
5 Oklahoma St. 61
4 Michigan St. 94
5 at Oklahoma St. 96 (3OT)
5 Oklahoma St. 81
12 DePaul 80
1 Virginia85
10 Lamar 70
2 LSU 73
10 at Lamar 93
7 Texas 63
10 Lamar 77
10 Lamar91
3 Arkansas 75
3 Arkansas 105
6 Northwestern 68
6 Northwestern 82
11 Washington St. 62

Final Four – New Orleans, LA

National semifinals
March 30
National championship
March 31
      
1ME Tennessee68
2W Stanford 60
1ME Tennessee70
1MW Virginia 67 (OT)
3E Connecticut 55
1MW Virginia61

Record by conference

Seventeen conferences had more than one bid, or at least one win in NCAA Tournament play: [7]

Conference# of BidsRecordWin %Round
of 32
Sweet
Sixteen
Elite
Eight
Final
Four
Championship
Game
Southeastern 7 11–6.647 5 4 3 1 1
Atlantic Coast 4 7–4.636 3 3 2 1 1
Pacific-10 4 5–4.556 3 2 1 1
Big Ten 4 2–4.333 4
Big West 3 3–3.500 3 1
Atlantic 10 3 1–3.250 2
Southwest 3 1–3.250 1 1
Big East 2 4–2.667 2 1 1 1
American South 2 3–2.600 1 1 1
Colonial 2 2–2.500 1 1
Metro 2 1–2.333 1
Big Eight 1 2–1.667 1 1
Gateway 1 1–1.500 1
Mid-American 1 1–1.500 1
Patriot 1 1–1.500 1
Southland 1 1–1.500 1
Sun Belt 1 1–1.500 1 1

Seven conferences went 0-1: Big Sky Conference, MAAC, North Star Conference, Ohio Valley Conference, Southern Conference, and WAC [7]

All-Tournament team

Game officials

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1990 NCAA Division I men's basketball tournament</span> United States top collegiate-level basketball tournament for 1990

The 1990 NCAA Division I men's basketball tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I men's college basketball. It began on March 15, 1990, and ended with the championship game on April 2 in Denver, Colorado. A total of 63 games were played.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2005 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 2005 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 19, 2005, and concluded on April 5, 2005, when Baylor was crowned as the new national champion. The Final Four was held for the first time at the RCA Dome in Indianapolis, Indiana on April 3 and 5, 2005, and was hosted by Butler University and the Horizon League. Future Final Fours will be held every five years in Indianapolis, the NCAA's home city, will be played at Lucas Oil Stadium, one block south of the Indiana Convention Center, where the RCA Dome is located. Baylor, coached by Kim Mulkey-Robertson, defeated Michigan State, coached by Joanne P. McCallie, 84–62 in the championship game. Baylor's Sophia Young was named Most Outstanding Player. For the first time, taking a page from the Men's Tournament, the regionals were named after the city they were played in, rather than the geographical location, and the "pod" system adopted by the Men's Tournament was used.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2008 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 2008 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament involved 64 teams playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the 2007–08 national champion of women's NCAA Division I college basketball. It commenced on March 22, 2008, and concluded when the University of Tennessee Lady Volunteers defeated the Stanford University Cardinal 64–48 on April 8, 2008 at the St. Pete Times Forum in Tampa, Florida.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2004 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 2004 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 20 and concluded on April 6 when Connecticut won a third consecutive national championship, becoming only the second school in history to accomplish such a feat. The Final Four was held at the New Orleans Arena in New Orleans, Louisiana, on April 4–6 and was hosted by Tulane University. UConn, coached by Geno Auriemma, defeated archrivals Tennessee, coached by Pat Summitt, 81–67 in the championship game. UConn's Diana Taurasi was named Most Outstanding Player for the second consecutive year. The tournament was also notable as UC Santa Barbara became the first double digit seed not to lose by a double-digit margin in the Sweet 16 as they lost to UConn 63–57.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1999 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 1999 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 12, 1999, and concluded on March 28, 1999, when Purdue won its first national championship in any women's sport. The Final Four was held at the San Jose Arena in San Jose, California, on March 26–28, 1999. Purdue defeated Duke 62-45 in Carolyn Peck's final game as head coach for the Boilermakers. She had previously announced her intention of leaving Purdue after two seasons to coach the expansion WNBA Orlando Miracle.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2002 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 2002 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament concluded on March 31, 2002 when Connecticut won the national title. The Final Four was held at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas on March 29–31, 2002. UConn, coached by Geno Auriemma, defeated Oklahoma 82-70 in the championship game.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1998 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 1998 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 13, 1998, and concluded on March 29, 1998, when Tennessee won the national title. The Final Four was held at Kemper Arena in Kansas City, Missouri, on March 27–29, 1998. Tennessee, Louisiana Tech, NC State, and Arkansas qualified to the Final Four. Tennessee and Louisiana Tech won their semi-final Final Four matchups and continued on to the championship. Tennessee defeated Louisiana Tech 93–75 to take their sixth title, and complete an undefeated season (39–0).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1986 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 1986 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 12 and ended on March 30. The tournament expanded to 40 teams from 32. The Final Four consisted of Texas, Tennessee, Western Kentucky, and USC, with Texas defeating Southern California, 97-81 in the championship game. Texas's Clarissa Davis was named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament. With their championship win, Texas completed the first undefeated season (34-0) since the NCAA began sponsoring women's basketball in 1982.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1987 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 1987 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 11, ended on March 29, and featured 40 teams. The Final Four were Texas, Tennessee, Louisiana Tech, and Long Beach State, with Tennessee winning its first title with a 67-44 victory over Louisiana Tech. Tennessee's Tonya Edwards was named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1988 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 1988 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 16 and ended on April 3. The tournament featured 40 teams. The Final Four consisted of Long Beach State, Auburn, Tennessee, and Louisiana Tech. Louisiana Tech won its second title with a 56-54 victory over Auburn. Louisiana Tech's Erica Westbrooks was named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1990 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 1990 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 11 and ended on April 1. The tournament featured 48 teams. The Final Four consisted of Virginia, Stanford, Auburn, and Louisiana Tech, with Stanford defeating Auburn 76-60 to win its first NCAA title. Stanford's Jennifer Azzi was named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2000 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 2000 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 17 and ended on April 2. The tournament featured 64 teams. The Final Four consisted of Connecticut, Penn St., Tennessee, and Rutgers, with Connecticut defeating Tennessee 71-52 to win its second NCAA title. Connecticut's Shea Ralph was named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2001 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 2001 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 16 and ended on April 1. The tournament featured 64 teams. The Final Four, held at the Savvis Center in St. Louis, consisted of Connecticut, Notre Dame, Purdue, and Southwest Missouri State, with Notre Dame defeating Purdue 68–66 to win its first NCAA title. Notre Dame's Ruth Riley was named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1992 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 1992 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 18 and ended on April 5. The tournament featured 48 teams. The Final Four consisted of Virginia, Stanford, Southwest Missouri State, and Western Kentucky, with Stanford defeating Western Kentucky 78–62 to win its second NCAA title. Stanford's Molly Goodenbour was named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1993 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 1993 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament began on March 17 and ended on April 4. The tournament featured 48 teams. The Final Four consisted of Ohio State, Iowa, Vanderbilt, and Texas Tech, with Texas Tech defeating Ohio State 84–82 to win its first NCAA title. Texas Tech's Sheryl Swoopes was named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1995 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 1995 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament featured 64 teams. The Final Four consisted of Connecticut, Tennessee, Stanford, and Georgia. Connecticut defeated Tennessee 70-64 to win its first NCAA title and complete a 35-0 undefeated season.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1996 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 1996 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament took place March 15–31, 1996. The Final Four consisted of Connecticut, Georgia, Stanford, and Tennessee. Tennessee defeated Georgia 83–65 in the championship game.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2013 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 2013 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament was played from March 23 through April 9, 2013. Tennessee continued its streak of making every NCAA Women's Basketball Tournament at 32 consecutive appearances. Kansas made the Regional Semifinals for the second year in a row as a double-digit seed, UConn made it into the Final Four for the sixth consecutive year, the longest such streak, and Louisville became the first team seeded lower than fourth in a region to advance to the championship game. For the first time in tournament history, the same four teams were #1 seeds as in the previous year.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2014 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament</span>

The 2014 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament was played in March and April 2014, with the Final Four played April 6–8. The Ohio Valley Conference served as the host institution. The Final Four was played at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, Tennessee.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tonya Cardoza</span>

Tonya Maria Cardoza is an NCAA women's basketball coach and the former head coach of the Temple University women's basketball team. She previously played basketball for the University of Virginia 1988–1991, and worked as an assistant coach at the University of Connecticut for fourteen seasons before joining the Temple coaching staff in 2008.

References

  1. "Important Dates in Privateer History". University of New Orleans. Retrieved 11 April 2012.
  2. Gregory Cooper. "1991 NCAA National Championship Tournament". Archived from the original on 2009-10-20. Retrieved 2007-04-16.
  3. "CHN Basketball History: Most Outstanding Player". Archived from the original on 2008-01-25. Retrieved 2007-04-16.
  4. "2009-10 JMU Women's Basketball Guide". James Madison University. p. 110. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  5. "UConn Moments: Top 10 Women's Games". Hartford Courant. October 18, 2009. Archived from the original on 2013-06-16. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  6. "Tennessee tips Virginia women in NCAA final". Bangor Dailey News. 1 April 1991. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Nixon, Rick. "Official 2022 NCAA Women's Final Four Records Book" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  8. "Attendance and Sites" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 19 March 2012.