AD 81

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
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Years:
AD 81 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar AD 81
LXXXI
Ab urbe condita 834
Assyrian calendar 4831
Balinese saka calendar 2–3
Bengali calendar −512
Berber calendar 1031
Buddhist calendar 625
Burmese calendar −557
Byzantine calendar 5589–5590
Chinese calendar 庚辰(Metal  Dragon)
2777 or 2717
     to 
辛巳年 (Metal  Snake)
2778 or 2718
Coptic calendar −203 – −202
Discordian calendar 1247
Ethiopian calendar 73–74
Hebrew calendar 3841–3842
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 137–138
 - Shaka Samvat 2–3
 - Kali Yuga 3181–3182
Holocene calendar 10081
Iranian calendar 541 BP – 540 BP
Islamic calendar 558 BH – 557 BH
Javanese calendar N/A
Julian calendar AD 81
LXXXI
Korean calendar 2414
Minguo calendar 1831 before ROC
民前1831年
Nanakshahi calendar −1387
Seleucid era 392/393 AG
Thai solar calendar 623–624
Tibetan calendar 阳金龙年
(male Iron-Dragon)
207 or −174 or −946
     to 
阴金蛇年
(female Iron-Snake)
208 or −173 or −945

A.D. 81 ( LXXXI ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Silva and Pollio (or, less frequently, year 834 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination A.D. 81 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 108 days remaining until the end of the year.

Domitian Emperor of Ancient Rome

Domitian was Roman emperor from 81 to 96. He was the younger brother of Titus and the son of Vespasian, his two predecessors on the throne, and the last member of the Flavian dynasty. During his reign, the authoritarian nature of his rule put him at sharp odds with the senate, whose powers he drastically curtailed.

Titus Emperor of Ancient Rome

Titus was Roman emperor from 79 to 81. A member of the Flavian dynasty, Titus succeeded his father Vespasian upon his death, thus becoming the first Roman emperor to come to the throne after his own biological father.

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  • The silver content of the Roman denarius rises to 92% under emperor Domitian, up from 81% in the reign of Vitellius.
Silver Chemical element with atomic number 47

Silver is a chemical element with symbol Ag and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it exhibits the highest electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity of any metal. The metal is found in the Earth's crust in the pure, free elemental form, as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a byproduct of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining.

Denarius Ancient coin of the Roman Republic and Empire

The denarius was the standard Roman silver coin from its introduction in the Second Punic War c. 211 BC to the reign of Gordian III, when it was gradually replaced by the Antoninianus. It continued to be minted in very small quantities, likely for ceremonial purposes, until and through the tetrarchy (293–313).

Vitellius Emperor of Ancient Rome

Vitellius was Roman Emperor for eight months, from 16 April to 22 December 69 AD. Vitellius was proclaimed emperor following the quick succession of the previous emperors Galba and Otho, in a year of civil war known as the Year of the Four Emperors.

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Related Research Articles

AD 79 Year

AD 79 (LXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Titus and Vespasianus. The denomination AD 79 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

The 90s ran from 90 AD to 99 AD.

AD 96 (XCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valens and Vetus. The denomination AD 96 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 39 (XXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Augustus and Corbulo. The denomination AD 39 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 64 (LXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Bassus and Crassus. The denomination AD 64 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 71 (LXXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Vespasian and Nerva. The denomination AD 71 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 84 (LXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Augustus and Sabinus. The denomination AD 84 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 91 (XCI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Glabrio and Traianus. The denomination AD 91 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 95 (XCV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Augustus and Clemens. The denomination AD 95 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Domitia Longina Empress of Rome

Domitia Longina was a Roman empress and wife to the Roman emperor Domitian. She was the youngest daughter of the general and consul Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo. Domitia divorced her first husband, Lucius Aelius Lamia Plautius Aelianus in order to marry Domitian in AD 71. The marriage produced only one son, whose early death is believed to have been the cause of a temporary rift between Domitia and her husband in AD 83. She became the empress upon Domitian's accession in AD 81, and remained so until his assassination in AD 96. She is believed to have died sometime between AD 126 and AD 130.

Flavian dynasty Roman dynasty

The Flavian dynasty was a Roman imperial dynasty, which ruled the Roman Empire between 69 AD and 96 AD, encompassing the reigns of Vespasian (69–79), and his two sons Titus (79–81) and Domitian (81–96). The Flavians rose to power during the civil war of 69, known as the Year of the Four Emperors. After Galba and Otho died in quick succession, Vitellius became emperor in mid 69. His claim to the throne was quickly challenged by legions stationed in the Eastern provinces, who declared their commander Vespasian emperor in his place. The Second Battle of Bedriacum tilted the balance decisively in favour of the Flavian forces, who entered Rome on December 20. The following day, the Roman Senate officially declared Vespasian emperor of the Roman Empire, thus commencing the Flavian dynasty. Although the dynasty proved to be short-lived, several significant historic, economic and military events took place during their reign.

Flavia (gens) families from Ancient Rome who shared the Flavius nomen

The gens Flavia was a plebeian family at Rome. Its members are first mentioned during the last three centuries of the Republic. The first of the Flavii to achieve prominence was Marcus Flavius, tribune of the plebs in 327 and 323 BC; however, no Flavius attained the consulship until Gaius Flavius Fimbria in 104 BC. The gens became illustrious during the first century AD, when the family of the Flavii Sabini claimed the imperial dignity.

Titus Flavius T. f. T. n. Clemens was a nephew of the Roman Emperor Vespasian. He was the son of Titus Flavius Sabinus, consul suffectus in AD 69, and a brother of Titus Flavius Sabinus, consul in AD 82. The emperors Titus and Domitian were his cousins.

Titus Aurelius Fulvus consul in 89

In the 1st century, there were two men with the name Titus Aurelius Fulvus. One was the paternal grandfather and the other the father to the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius.

<i>The Twelve Caesars</i> 12 biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire, written by Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus in 121 CE

De vita Caesarum, commonly known as The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire written by Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus.

See also Titus Flavius Sabinus (disambiguation) for other men of this name.

References

  1. "BBC - History - Historic Figures: Titus (39 AD - 81 AD)". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 7 April 2019.