Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department

Last updated
Chief of the City of Los Angeles Police Department
Seal of the Los Angeles Police Department.png
Seal of the LAPD
Flag of the Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department.png
Flag of the Chief of the LAPD
LAPD Chief Michel Moore speaks at South L.A. rally to end gun violence (cropped).jpg
Incumbent
Michel Moore

since June 27, 2018 (2018-06-27)
Flag of the Los Angeles Police Department.png Los Angeles Police Department
Style Chief of Police
Seat Los Angeles County, California, U.S.
Appointer Mayor of Los Angeles
Term length 5 years Renewable
Inaugural holder Jacob F. Gerkens
FormationDecember 18, 1876
Salary$307,291
Website https://www.lapdonline.org/office-of-the-chief-of-police/

The Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department is the head of the LAPD.

Contents

List of police chiefs

ChiefTerm beganTerm endedNotes
Jacob F. Gerkens December 18, 1876December 26, 1877 [1]
Emil Harris December 27, 1877December 5, 1878 [2]
Henry King December 5, 1878December 11, 1880 [3]
George E. Gard December 12, 1880December 10, 1881 [4]
Henry King December 11, 1881June 30, 1883 [5]
Thomas J. Cuddy July 1, 1883January 1, 1885 [6]
Edward McCarthy January 2, 1885May 12, 1885 [7]
John Horner May 13, 1885December 22, 1885 [8]
James W. Davis December 22, 1885December 8, 1886 [9]
John K. Skinner December 13, 1886August 29, 1887 [10]
P.M. Darcy September 5, 1887January 22, 1888 [11]
Thomas J. Cuddy January 23, 1888September 4, 1888 [6]
L.G. Loomis September 5, 1888September 30, 1888 [12]
Hubert H. Benedict October 1, 1888January 1, 1889 [13]
Terrence Cooney January 1, 1889April 1, 1889 [14]
James E. Burns April 1, 1889July 17, 1889 [15]
John M. Glass July 17, 1889January 1, 1900 [16]
Charles Elton January 1, 1900April 5, 1904 [17]
William A. Hammell April 6, 1904October 31, 1905 [18]
Walter H. Auble November 1, 1905November 20, 1906 [19]
Edward Kern November 20, 1906January 5, 1909 [20]
Thomas Broadhead January 5, 1909April 12, 1909 [21]
Edward F. Dishman April 13, 1909January 15, 1910 [22]
Alexander Galloway February 14, 1910December 27, 1910 [23]
Charles E. Sebastian January 3, 1911July 16, 1915 [24]
Clarence E. Snively July 17, 1915October 15, 1916 [25]
John L. Butler October 16, 1916July 16, 1919 [26]
George K. Home July 17, 1919September 30, 1920 [27]
Alexander W. Murray October 1, 1920October 31, 1920 [28]
Lyle Pendegast November 1, 1920July 4, 1921 [29]
Charles A. Jones July 5, 1921January 3, 1922 [30]
James W. Everington January 4, 1922April 21, 1922 [31]
Louis D. Oaks April 22, 1922August 1, 1923 [32]
August Vollmer August 1, 1923August 1, 1924 [33]
R. Lee Heath August 1, 1924March 31, 1926 [34]
James E. Davis April 1, 1926December 29, 1929 [35]
Roy E. Steckel December 30, 1929August 9, 1933 [36]
James E. Davis August 10, 1933November 18, 1938 [37]
David A. Davidson November 19, 1938June 23, 1939 [38]
Arthur C. Hohmann June 24, 1939June 5, 1941 [39]
Clemence B. Horrall June 16, 1941June 28, 1949 [40]
William A. Worton June 30, 1949August 9, 1950 [41] Interim Chief
William H. Parker August 9, 1950July 16, 1966 [42] [43]
Thad F. Brown July 18, 1966February 17, 1967 [44]
Thomas Reddin February 18, 1967May 5, 1969 [45]
Roger E. Murdock May 6, 1969August 28, 1969 [46] Interim Chief
Edward M. Davis August 29, 1969January 16, 1978 [47] [48]
Robert F. Rock January 16, 1978March 28, 1978 [49] Interim Chief
Daryl F. Gates March 28, 1978June 27, 1992 [50] [51] [52]
Willie L. Williams June 30, 1992May 17, 1997 [53] [54]
Bayan Lewis May 18, 1997August 12, 1997 [55] Interim Chief
Bernard C. Parks August 12, 1997May 4, 2002 [56] [57]
Martin H. Pomeroy May 7, 2002October 26, 2002 [58] Interim Chief
William J. Bratton October 27, 2002October 31, 2009 [59] [60]
Michael P. Downing October 30, 2009November 17, 2009 [61] Interim Chief
Charles L. Beck November 17, 2009June 27, 2018 [62] [63]
Michel Moore June 27, 2018Incumbent [64]

See also

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References

  1. "Jacob T. Gerkens". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  2. "Emil Harris". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  3. "Henry King". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  4. "George E. Gard". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  5. "Henry King". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  6. 1 2 "Thomas J. Cuddy". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  7. "Edward McCarthy". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  8. "John Horner". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  9. "James W. Davis". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  10. "John K. Skinner". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  11. "P.M. Darcy". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  12. "L.G. Loomis". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  13. "Hubert H. Benedict". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  14. "Terrence Cooney". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  15. "James E. Burns". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  16. "John M. Glass". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  17. "Charles Elton". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  18. "William A. Hammell". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  19. "Walter H. Auble". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  20. "Edward Kern". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  21. "Thomas Broadhead". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  22. "Edward F. Dishman". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  23. "Alexander Galloway". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  24. "Charles E. Sebastian". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  25. "Clarence E. Snively". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  26. "John L. Butler". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  27. "George K. Home". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  28. "Alexander W. Murray". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  29. "Lyle Pendegast". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  30. "Charles A. Jones". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  31. "James W. Everington". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  32. "Louis D. Oaks". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  33. "August Vollmer". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  34. "R. Lee Heath". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  35. "James E. Davis". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  36. "Roy E. Steckel". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  37. "James E. Davis". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  38. "D. A. Davidson". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  39. "Arthur C. Hohmann". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  40. "Clemence B. Horrall". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  41. "William A. Worton". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  42. "William H. Parker". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  43. Chief Parker
  44. "Thad F. Brown". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  45. "Thomas Reddin". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  46. "Roger E. Murdock". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  47. "Edward M. Davis". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  48. Chief Davis
  49. "Robert F. Rock". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  50. "Daryl F. Gates". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  51. Chief Gates
  52. Chief Daryl Gates
  53. "Willie L. Williams". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  54. Chief Williams
  55. "Bayan Lewis". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  56. "Bernard C. Parks". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  57. Chief Parks
  58. "Martin H. Pomeroy". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  59. "William J. Bratton". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  60. Chief Bratton
  61. "Angelo Garcia". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2014-01-07.
  62. "Charles L. Beck". Los Angeles Police Department . Retrieved 2008-04-02.
  63. Chief Beck
  64. Stoltze, Frank (June 4, 2018). "Michel Moore appointed LAPD chief to replace Charlie Beck". KPCC. Retrieved June 4, 2018.