Coalmont Formation

Last updated
Coalmont Formation
Stratigraphic range: Paleocene-Wasatchian
~60–50  Ma
North Park Phacelia Habitat (5716435022).jpg
Coalmont Formation, Jackson County, Colorado
Type Formation
UnderliesNorth Park Formation
Overlies Cretaceous strata [1]
Thickness9,000 feet (2,700 m) [1]
Lithology
Primary Sandstone
Other Clay, Shale, Coal
Location
Coordinates 40°24′N106°30′W / 40.4°N 106.5°W / 40.4; -106.5 Coordinates: 40°24′N106°30′W / 40.4°N 106.5°W / 40.4; -106.5
Approximate paleocoordinates 45°00′N90°18′W / 45.0°N 90.3°W / 45.0; -90.3
Region Colorado
CountryFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Extent North Park intermountaine basin
Type section
Named for Coalmont, Jackson County, Colorado [2]
Named byA. L. Beekly [2]
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Coalmont Formation (the United States)
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Coalmont Formation (Colorado)

The Coalmont Formation (Tmc) is a geologic formation that outcrops in the North Park intermountaine basin in Colorado. It contains fossil plants and coal layers dating back to the Paleogene period. [3]

Contents

Fossil content

Geologic map of the North Park Basin with the Coalmont Formation indicated in light green (Tmc) USGS North Park Basin geologic map.png
Geologic map of the North Park Basin with the Coalmont Formation indicated in light green (Tmc)

The following fossils have been reported from the formation: [3]

Insects

Flora

Wasatchian correlations

Wasatchian correlations in North America
Formation Wasatch DeBeque Claron Indian Meadows Pass Peak Tatman Willwood Golden Valley Coldwater Allenby Kamloops Ootsa Lake Margaret Nanjemoy Hatchetigbee Tetas de Cabra Hannold Hill Coalmont Cuchara Galisteo San Jose Ypresian (IUCS) • Itaboraian (SALMA)
Bumbanian (ALMA) • Mangaorapan (NZ)
Basin Powder River
Uinta
Piceance
Colorado Plateau
Wind River
Green River
Bighorn
Piceance




Colorado Plateau





Wind River





Green River






Bighorn
Williston Okanagan Princeton Buck Creek Nechako Sverdrup Potomac GoM Laguna Salada Rio Grande North Park Raton Galisteo San Juan
North America laea relief location map with borders.jpg
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Orange pog.svg
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Coalmont Formation (North America)
CountryFlag of the United States.svg  United States Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Flag of the United States.svg  United States Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Copelemur Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg
Coryphodon Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg
Diacodexis Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg
Homogalax Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg
Oxyaena Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg
Paramys Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg Orange pog.svg
Primates Brown pog.svg Brown pog.svg Brown pog.svg Brown pog.svg Brown pog.svg Brown pog.svg Brown pog.svg
Birds White pog.svg White pog.svg White pog.svg White pog.svg White pog.svg
Reptiles SpringGreen pog.svg SpringGreen pog.svg SpringGreen pog.svg SpringGreen pog.svg SpringGreen pog.svg SpringGreen pog.svg SpringGreen pog.svg
Fish Blue pog.svg Blue pog.svg Blue pog.svg Blue pog.svg Blue pog.svg Blue pog.svg Blue pog.svg
Insects Steel pog.svg Steel pog.svg Steel pog.svg Steel pog.svg Steel pog.svg Steel pog.svg
Flora Green pog.svg Green pog.svg Green pog.svg Green pog.svg Green pog.svg Green pog.svg Green pog.svg Green pog.svg Green pog.svg
Environments Alluvial-fluvio-lacustrineFluvialFluvialFluvio-lacustrineFluvialLacustrineFluvio-lacustrineDeltaic-paludalShallow marineFluvialShallow marineFluvialFluvial
Pink ff0080 pog.svg Wasatchian volcanoclastics

Orange pog.svg Wasatchian fauna

Dark Green 004040 pog.svg Wasatchian flora
VolcanicYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNoYesNo

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Hail, W.J. and Leopold, E.B., 1960. Paleocene and Eocene age of the Coalmont Formation, North Park, Colorado. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 400-B, pp.B260-B261.
  2. 1 2 Beekly, A.L., 1915. Geology and coal resources of North Park, Colorado. U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 596, 121 p
  3. 1 2 Coalmont Formation at Fossilworks.org
  4. 1 2 Cockerell, 1916
  5. 1 2 3 4 Cockerell, 1918
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Brown, 1962

Bibliography