Double summit

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A double summit, double peak, twin summit or twin peak refers to a mountain or hill that has two summits, separated by a col or saddle.

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A syncline forms this double summit in Patagonia Synclinal perche.jpg
A syncline forms this double summit in Patagonia

One well known double summit is Austria’s highest mountain, the Großglockner, where the main summit of the Großglockner is separated from that of the Kleinglockner by the Glocknerscharte col in the area of a geological fault. [1] Other double summits have resulted from geological folding. For example, on Mont Withrow in British Columbia resistant sandstones form the limbs of the double summit, whilst the softer rock in the core of the fold was eroded. [2]

Triple peaks occur more rarely - one example is the Rosengartenspitze in the Dolomites. The Illimani in Bolivia is an example of a quadruple summit.

Well known double summits (selection)

Well known double summits are (roughly from east to west):

Europe

Limestone Alps

The Furchetta in the Dolomites Furchetta 1.jpg
The Furchetta in the Dolomites

Central Alps

The Grossglockner with the twin summits of the Kleinglockner (l) and Grossglockner (r) Grossglockner vom Fuscherkarkopf.JPG
The Großglockner with the twin summits of the Kleinglockner (l) and Großglockner (r)

Other mountain ranges of Europe

The twin-peaked Elbrus in the Caucasus Zweigipfel.jpg
The twin-peaked Elbrus in the Caucasus

Asia

Ushba in the Caucasus Ushba.jpg
Ushba in the Caucasus

Other mountain regions

Double Peak in Washington (USA) Double Peak MRNP.jpg
Double Peak in Washington (USA)

Related Research Articles

Geography of Austria

Austria is a small, predominantly mountainous country in Central Europe, approximately between Germany, Italy and Hungary. It has a total area of 83,879 km² (32,385 mi²), about twice the size of Switzerland.

Main chain of the Alps

The main chain of the Alps, also called the Alpine divide is the central line of mountains that forms the water divide of the range. Main chains of mountain ranges are traditionally designated in this way, and generally include the highest peaks of a range. The Alps are something of an unusual case in that several significant groups of mountains are separated from the main chain by sizable distances. Among these groups are the Dauphine Alps, the Eastern and Western Graians, the entire Bernese Alps, the Tödi, Albula and Silvretta groups, the Ortler and Adamello ranges, and the Dolomites of South Tyrol, as well as the lower Alps of Vorarlberg, Bavaria and Salzburg.

The higher region of the Alps were long left to the exclusive attention of the inhabitants of the adjoining valleys, even when Alpine travellers began to visit these valleys. It is reckoned that about 20 glacier passes were certainly known before 1600, about 25 more before 1700, and yet another 20 before 1800; but though the attempt of P.A. Arnod in 1689 to "re-open" the Col du Ceant may be counted as made by a non-native, historical records do not show any further such activities until the last quarter of the 18th century. Nor did it fare much better with the high peaks, though the two earliest recorded ascents were due to non-natives, that of the Rocciamelone in 1358 having been undertaken in fulfilment of a vow, and that of the Mont Aiguille in 1492 by order of Charles VIII of France, in order to destroy its immense reputation for inaccessibility – in 1555 Conrad Gesner did not climb Pilatus proper, but only the grassy mound of the Gnepfstein, the lowest and the most westerly of the seven summits.

Wildspitze mountain

Wildspitze is the highest mountain in the Ötztal Alps and in North Tyrol, as well as the second highest mountain in Austria after the Großglockner and in terms of prominence is the fourth summit of the Alps and the fifteenth of Europe.

Grossglockner The highest mountain in Austria

The Grossglockner is, at 3,798 metres above the Adriatic (12,461 ft), the highest mountain in Austria and the highest mountain in the Alps east of the Brenner Pass. It is part of the larger Glockner Group of the Hohe Tauern range, situated along the main ridge of the Central Eastern Alps and the Alpine divide. The Pasterze, Austria's most extended glacier, lies on the Grossglockner's eastern slope.

Ötztal Alps mountain range in the Central Eastern Alps

The Ötztal Alps are a mountain range in the Central Eastern Alps, in the State of Tyrol in southern Austria and the Province of South Tyrol in northern Italy.

Aiguille de Bionnassay mountain in the Mont-Blanc massif in the Alps

The Aiguille de Bionnassay is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif of the Alps in France and Italy. It has been described as "one of the most attractive satellite peaks of Mont Blanc", and is located on its western side. The mountain's south and east ridges form the frontier between the two countries, and its summit is a knife-edge crest of snow and ice. Reaching it via any route provides a "splendid and serious snow and ice climb".

High Tauern A mountain range of the eastern Alps

The High Tauern are a mountain range on the main chain of the Central Eastern Alps, comprising the highest peaks east of the Brenner Pass. The crest forms the southern border of the Austrian states of Salzburg, Carinthia and East Tyrol, with a small part in the southwest belongs to the Italian province of South Tyrol. The range includes Austria's highest mountain, the Grossglockner at 3,798 metres (12,461 ft) above the Adriatic.

Aiguille du Midi mountain

The Aiguille du Midi is a 3,842-metre-tall (12,605 ft) mountain in the Mont Blanc massif within the French Alps. It is a popular tourist destination and can be directly accessed by cable car from Chamonix that takes visitors close to Mont Blanc.

Hoher Dachstein mountain

Hoher Dachstein is a strongly karstic Austrian mountain, and the second highest mountain in the Northern Limestone Alps. It is situated at the border of Upper Austria and Styria in central Austria, and is the highest point in each of those states. Parts of the massif also lie in the state of Salzburg, leading to the mountain being referred to as the Drei-Länder-Berg. The Dachstein massif covers an area of around 20×30 km with dozens of peaks above 2,500 m, the highest of which are in the southern and south-western areas. Seen from the north, the Dachstein massif is dominated by the glaciers with the rocky summits rising beyond them. By contrast, to the south, the mountain drops almost vertically to the valley floor.

Geography of the Alps

The Alps cover a large area. This article describes the delimitation of the Alps as a whole and of subdivisions of the range, follows the course of the main chain of the Alps and discusses the lakes and glaciers found in the region.

Radstadt Tauern mountain range

The Radstadt Tauern are a subrange of the Central Eastern Alps in Austria. Together with the Schladming Tauern, the Rottenmann and Wölz Tauern and the Seckau Tauern the Radstadt Tauern form the major range of mountains known as the Low Tauern. The mountains are found in the southeast of the Austrian state of Salzburg, between the upper reaches of the Enns and Mur rivers.

Mont Blanc du Tacul mountain in the Mont Blanc massif of the Alps

Mont Blanc du Tacul is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif of the French Alps situated midway between the Aiguille du Midi and Mont Blanc.

Aiguille Blanche de Peuterey mountain in the Mont Blanc massif in the Alps

The Aiguille Blanche de Peuterey is a mountain of the Mont Blanc massif in Italy. It is considered the most difficult and serious of the alpine 4000-m mountains to climb.

Aiguille des Glaciers mountain in the Mont-Blanc massif

The Aiguille des Glaciers is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif of the Graian Alps. It lies on the borders of Savoie and Haute-Savoie in France and Aosta Valley in Italy.

Three-thousanders are mountains with a height of between 3,000 metres (9,800 ft), but less than 4,000 metres (13,000 ft) above sea level. Similar terms are commonly used for mountains of other height brackets e. g. four-thousanders or eight-thousanders. In Britain, the term may refer to mountains above 3,000 feet (910 m).

Teufelshorn (Glockner Group) mountain in the Glockner Group at the border Salzburg / East Tyrol

The Teufelshorn is a mountain in the Glockner Group in the Austrian Central Alps in the central part of the High Tauern. According to the literature it is 3,677 metres high, but the Austrian Federal Office for Metrology and Survey gives its height as 3,680 metres. It lies on the Northwest Ridge (Nordwestgrat) of Austria's highest peak, the neighbouring Großglockner, along which the border between the Austrian federal states of Tyrol and Carinthia runs. The Teufelshorn has a turret-like summit that juts about 30 metres above the massif itself and, together with the nearby and similar-looking Glocknerhorn, forms a twin peak. The Teufelshorn was first climbed on 8 August 1884 by Moriz von Kuffner, guided by Christian Ranggetiner and E. Rubesoier. The 3,680-metre-high (12,070 ft) Glocknerhorn, by contrast, had already been conquered on 29 August 1879 by the Alpinists, Gustav Gröger and Christian Ranggetiner.

Schladming Tauern mountain range of the Austrian Alps

The Schladming Tauern are a subrange of the Austrian Central Alps within the Eastern Alps. Together with the Radstadt Tauern, the Rottenmann and Wölz Tauern and the Seckau Tauern the Schladming Tauern form the major range known as the Low Tauern. The mountains are located in Austria in the federal states of Salzburg and Styria. Its highest peak, at 2,862 m is the Hochgolling.

Rottenmann and Wölz Tauern mountain range

The Rottenmann and Wölz Tauern are a subrange of the Austrian Central Alps within the Eastern Alps. Together with the Radstadt Tauern, the Schladming Tauern and the Seckau Tauern the Rottenmann and Wölz Tauern form the major range known as the Low Tauern. The mountains are located in Austria in the federal state of Styria.

Zwölferkogel is the name of various mountains, all in Austria:

References

  1. "Geologische Karte der Republik Österreich, 1:50.000, Blatt 153, Wien 1994". Geologische Bundesanstalt. Archived from the original on 8 June 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2009.
  2. Mt. Withrow syncline Archived 2006-04-04 at the Wayback Machine retrieved 12 May 2009.