Emblem of Laos

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National Emblem of the Lao People's Democratic Republic
Coat of arms of Laos.svg
Armiger Lao People's Democratic Republic
Adopted1991
Motto ສັນຕິພາບ ເອກະລາດ ປະຊາທິປະໄຕ
"Peace, Independence, Democracy"

ເອກະພາບ ວັດຖະນາຖາວອນ
"Unity and Prosperity"

ສາທາລະນະລັດ ປະຊາທິປະໄຕ ປະຊາຊົນລາວ
"Lao People's Democratic Republic"
Order(s) Cog
Other elementsA crescent-shaped stalks of fully ripened rice at both sides in between the tips of the Pagoda and the red ribbon wrapped around it also on both sides with the National Motto and the Name of the State.

The National Emblem of the Lao People's Democratic Republic shows the national shrine Pha That Luang. A dam is pictured which as a symbol of power generation at the reservoir Nam Ngum. An asphalt street is also pictured, as well as a stylized watered field.

Contents

In the lower part is a section of a gear wheel. The inscription on the left reads "Peace, Independence, Democracy" (Lao script: ສັນຕິພາບ ເອກະລາດ ປະຊາທິປະໄຕ) and on the right, "Unity and Prosperity" (Lao script: ເອກະພາບ ວັດຖະນາຖາວອນ.)

History

The coat of arms was changed in August 1991 in relation to the fall of the Soviet Union. The Communist red star and hammer and sickle were replaced with the national shrine at Pha That Luang. The coat of arms is specified in the Laotian constitution:

The National Emblem of the Lao People's Democratic Republic is a circle depicting in the bottom part one-half of a cog wheel and red ribbon with inscriptions [of the words] "Lao People's Democratic Republic", and [flanked by] crescent-shaped stalks of fully ripened rice at both sides and red ribbons bearing the inscription "Peace, Independence, Democracy, Unity, Prosperity". A picture of Pha That Luang Pagoda is located between the tips of the stalks of rice. A road, a paddy field, a forest and a hydroelectric dam are depicted in the middle of the circle.

Constitution of the Lao People's Democratic Republic, § 90 [1]

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References

  1. Constitution of the Lao People's Democratic Republic, § 90 Official website of the Laotian embassy in Thailand.