Kirstead

Last updated
Kirstead
St Margarets, Kirstead - geograph.org.uk - 160554.jpg
Norfolk UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Kirstead
Kirstead shown within Norfolk
Area 4.19 km2 (1.62 sq mi)
Population 279 
  Density 67/km2 (170/sq mi)
OS grid reference TM298974
Civil parish
  • Kirstead
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town NORWICH
Postcode district NR15
Police Norfolk
Fire Norfolk
Ambulance East of England
EU Parliament East of England
List of places
UK
England
Norfolk
52°31′35″N1°23′13″E / 52.52649°N 1.3869°E / 52.52649; 1.3869 Coordinates: 52°31′35″N1°23′13″E / 52.52649°N 1.3869°E / 52.52649; 1.3869

Kirstead is a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk.

Civil parish territorial designation and lowest tier of local government in England, UK

In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government, they are a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. Civil parishes can trace their origin to the ancient system of ecclesiastical parishes which historically played a role in both civil and ecclesiastical administration; civil and religious parishes were formally split into two types in the 19th century and are now entirely separate. The unit was devised and rolled out across England in the 1860s.

Norfolk County of England

Norfolk is a county in East Anglia in England. It borders Lincolnshire to the northwest, Cambridgeshire to the west and southwest, and Suffolk to the south. Its northern and eastern boundaries are the North Sea and, to the north-west, The Wash. The county town is Norwich. With an area of 2,074 square miles (5,370 km2) and a population of 859,400, Norfolk is a largely rural county with a population density of 401 per square mile. Of the county's population, 40% live in four major built up areas: Norwich (213,000), Great Yarmouth (63,000), King's Lynn (46,000) and Thetford (25,000).

Contents

The main settlement is Kirstead Green. The parish covers an area of 4.19 km2 (1.62 sq mi) and had a population of 247 in 89 households at the 2001 census, [1] the population increasing to 279 at the 2011 census. [2] For the purposes of local government, it falls within the district of South Norfolk.

Kirstead Green village in United Kingdom

Kirstead Green is a village in the English county of Norfolk. Administratively it is part of the civil parish of Kirstead within the district of South Norfolk.

Non-metropolitan district Type of local government district in England

Non-metropolitan districts, or colloquially "shire districts", are a type of local government district in England. As created, they are sub-divisions of non-metropolitan counties in a two-tier arrangement.

In 1870-72, Kirstead was described by John Marius Wilson such as:

Kirstead, a village and a parish in Loddon district, Norfolk. The village stands 4¼ miles W of Loddon, and 5½ ESE of Swainsthorpe r. station; and has a postoffice under Norwich. [3]

The Village

There are no pubs in Kirstead itself, however, there are 14 within a 5-mile radius of the village. There is also Kirstead Hall described as,

“a fine Grade 1 listed Elizabethan Manor house Circa 1570 of 'E' shaped plan with stepped Flemish gable ends. The brickwork with attractive blue diaper decoration and pin tiled roof standing in 4 acres.” [4]

There are 3 regular bus services through Kirstead connecting the village with Bungay, Norwich and Halesworth. [5] There isn't a train station in Kirstead however, the main station of Norwich is only 10 miles away linking residents with London.

19th Century map of Kirstead within the surrounding area. Old kirstead map.jpg
19th Century map of Kirstead within the surrounding area.

Demography

In 1801, Kirstead had a total population of 168 people. This rose and fell until 1951 where it recorded its lowest population of 149 people but since then, the population has increased to 279, as seen in the 2011 census. [6] According to the 2011 Census, the majority of the population are White British [7] with 66.3% being Christian. There are no other recorded religions, with the rest of the population having no religion (26.5%) or not stating (6%). [8]

Illustrates the population of Kirstead from 1801 to 2011. KirsteadPopulation..jpg
Illustrates the population of Kirstead from 1801 to 2011.

There is a very clear difference in the different professions that each gender undertook. Jobs that required manual labour such as agriculture and workers in various mineral and vegetable substances were all undertaken by males. There are no female professionals. [ citation needed ]

Professions in Kirstead 1881 Professions in Kirstead 1881.jpg
Professions in Kirstead 1881

Education

In total, 17 residents of Kirstead have no education. According to the 2011 Census, [9] 31 people have a higher qualification of a degree and 169 with qualifications below a degree. There are a number of primary and secondary schools within the surrounding area of Kirstead and they boast a number of well performing institutions. [10]

History

Kirstead Hall

In 1095 the site was part of the outlying lands of the Abbey of Bury St Edmunds. The distance between the church and the village’s location in present-day is thought to have been due to the Black Death which struck in 1450. The old village’s population decreased resulting in a new one being built in a different location.

Under the reign of Henry VIII c.1535 the abbey was closed due to the introduction of the Church of England and the site was bought by John and Elizabeth Cook. In 1544 the building and surrounding land was bought by Thomas Godsalve who was a lawyer in the Court of Norwich to expand his large estate.

The building was inherited by his son Sir John Godsalve who was Clerk of the Signet to Henry VII and under Edward VI was Comptroller of the Mint. His son Thomas in turn took over ownership and extended it to become a house and the hall it is today. [11]

Kirstead War Memorial

To the right of St Margaret's Churchyard lies Kirstead War Memorial which honors the memory of the 17 people who gave their lives in World War 1. [12]

Notes

  1. "Kirstead parish information". South Norfolk Council. 31 January 2007. Archived from the original on 5 September 2008. Retrieved 20 June 2009.
  2. "Civil Parish population 2011" . Retrieved 5 September 2015.
  3. Wilson, John Marius (1870–72). Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales. Edinburgh: A. Fullerton & Co.
  4. "Kirstead Hall". Historic Houses Association.
  5. "List Bus Services". Travel Search. Carlberry. Retrieved 2016-04-20.
  6. "Total Population". Neighbourhood Statistics. Retrieved 15 March 2016.
  7. "Ethnicity". Neighbourhood Statistics. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  8. "Religion". Neighbourhood Statistics. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  9. "Education". Neighbourhood Statistics. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  10. "School Guide". School Guide. Retrieved 2016-04-20.
  11. "Kirstead Hall". Historic Houses Association. Retrieved 19 March 2016.
  12. "Roll of Honour". Roll of Honour. Retrieved 2016-04-20.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Kirstead at Wikimedia Commons

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