Haddiscoe

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Haddiscoe
St Mary's Church, Haddiscoe (1) - geograph.org.uk - 587997.jpg
St Mary's parish church
Norfolk UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Haddiscoe
Location within Norfolk
Area19.88 km2 (7.68 sq mi)
Population487 (2011 Census)
  Density 24/km2 (62/sq mi)
OS grid reference TM444969
Civil parish
  • Haddiscoe
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Norwich
Postcode district NR14
Dialling code 01502
Police Norfolk
Fire Norfolk
Ambulance East of England
UK Parliament
Website Haddiscoe
List of places
UK
England
Norfolk
52°30′55″N1°36′02″E / 52.51514°N 1.60062°E / 52.51514; 1.60062 Coordinates: 52°30′55″N1°36′02″E / 52.51514°N 1.60062°E / 52.51514; 1.60062

Haddiscoe is a village and civil parish in the South Norfolk district of Norfolk, England, about 16 miles (26 km) southeast of Norwich. The parish is on the county boundary with Suffolk, about 7 miles (11 km) west-northwest of Lowestoft. The parish includes the hamlet of Thorpe-next-Haddiscoe, about 1 mile (1.6 km) north of Haddiscoe village. [1]

Contents

The civil parish has an area of 19.88 km2 (7.68 sq mi).[ citation needed ] The 2011 Census recorded its population as 487 people in 210 households. [2]

Toponym

The Domesday Book of 1086 records the toponym as Hadescou. An entry for 1208 in the feet of fines and one for 1236 in the Book of Fees each record it as Hadesco. A Close Roll dated 1253 records it as Haddesco. [3]

The toponym is derived from Old Norse. "Hadd" was someone's name, and the second part of the word is derived from the Norse word skōgr meaning "wood", so the place was "Hadd's wood". [3]

Churches

The local church in the village is dedicated to St. Mary and was originally constructed in the 15th century. The oldest part of the Church of England parish church of St Mary is the 11th-century west tower. [4] St Mary's is one of 124 round-tower churches in Norfolk. Inside the church are 14th-century murals including one of St Christopher carrying Jesus Christ. [4] Jan Pier Pier, a 16th-century Dutch immigrant and creator of some of the dykes surrounding the village, is buried in the nave.[ citation needed ] St Mary's is a Grade I listed building. [4]

St Matthias' parish church, Thorpe-next-Haddiscoe St Matthias church Thorpe-next-Haddiscoe Norfolk (4233047909).jpg
St Matthias' parish church, Thorpe-next-Haddiscoe

In Thorpe-next-Haddiscoe is the Church of England parish church of St Matthias. It too has an 11th-century round tower. Its nave has a thatched roof, and its chancel was rebuilt in brick in 1838. St Matthias' is a Grade I listed building. [5]

Economic and social history

Haddiscoe was in Clavering hundred. [6]

Haddiscoe was the site of Norfolk's only Knights Templar preceptory.[ citation needed ] It was dissolved in the 14th Century.

The Haddiscoe Hoard, the largest hoard of English Civil War coins found in Norfolk to date, was found on 17 July 2003 by a workman on a flood defence scheme.[ citation needed ]

Toft Monk's windpump Toft Monks Mill, Haddiscoe.jpg
Toft Monk's windpump

Toft Monks mill is a disused windpump that used to drain the marshes into the River Waveney. [7]

The Haddiscoe Cut (New Cut), a canal linking the River Waveney and River Yare, was opened in 1833. It joins the River Waveney in the parish near Haddiscoe railway station. The cut now forms part of the parish boundary.

Under the Poor Law Amendment Act 1834 Haddiscoe was in the Loddon and Clavering Union. [6]

A railway linking Reedham and Lowestoft was authorised in 1845 and opened by the Norfolk Railway in 1847. It passes through Haddiscoe parish, partly alongside the Haddiscoe Cut. The original Haddiscoe railway station was opened to serve it.

In 1862 the Norfolk Railway became part of the Great Eastern Railway, which in 1904 replaced the original Haddiscoe railway station with the present one. It is about 1 12 miles (2.4 km) from the centre of the village and is served by Wherry Lines trains linking Norwich and Lowestoft.

The landscape painter Sir John Arnesby Brown (1866–1955) lived in Haddiscoe and is buried in St Mary's parish churchyard. [8]

A stray V-1 flying bomb fell in Haddiscoe in the Second World War.[ citation needed ]

Related Research Articles

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Lowestoft Human settlement in England

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Somerleyton Human settlement in England

Somerleyton is a village of medieval origin and former civil parish in the English county of Suffolk, England. It is centred 4.5 miles (7 km) north-west of Lowestoft and 5.7 miles (9 km) south-west of Great Yarmouth. The land associated with the village is partly in The Broads National Park including its free moorings and marina on the River Waveney close to its public house. In 1961 the parish had a population of 377. Somerleyton is now in the civil parish of Somerleyton, Ashby and Herringfleet which maintains a village hall elsewhere and cricket ground and tennis court in the village. Other amenities include a village shop and a railway station. In 1987 the parish was merged with Ashby and Herringfleet to form "Somerleyton, Ashby and Herringfleet".

Haddiscoe Cut

The Haddiscoe Cut or New Cut is a canal in the English county of Norfolk and in The Broads. The cut was conceived as a way to provide a more direct route from Lowestoft to Norwich, and was built as part of a larger scheme which included the linking of the River Waveney to Oulton Broad and Lake Lothing. It was opened in 1833, but the new route was not a financial success, and it was sold to a railway developer in 1842. It remained in railway ownership until Nationalisation in 1948, and was damaged by floods in 1953. An attempt to close it in 1954 was resisted by local interests, resulting in it being repaired. It is now managed by the Environment Agency.

River Yare River in England

The River Yare is a river in the English county of Norfolk. In its lower reaches it is one of the principal navigable waterways of The Broads and connects with the rest of the network.

Halesworth Small town and civil parish in Suffolk, United Kingdom

Halesworth is a small market town, civil parish and electoral ward in the northeastern corner of Suffolk, England. The population was measured at 4,726 in the 2011 Census. It is located 15 miles (24 km) south west of Lowestoft, and stands on a small tributary of the River Blyth, 9 miles (14 km) upstream from Southwold. The town is served by Halesworth railway station on the Ipswich–Lowestoft East Suffolk Line. Halesworth is twinned with both Bouchain in France and Eitorf in Germany.

Denton, Norfolk Human settlement in England

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Billingford, Breckland Human settlement in England

Billingford is a village and civil parish in the Breckland district of Norfolk, England, about 3 12 miles (5.6 km) north of East Dereham. The village is just north of the River Wensum, which forms the southern boundary of the parish. The village is on the B1145 road, which links King's Lynn and Mundesley. The 2011 Census recorded the parish population as 253.

Burgh St Peter Human settlement in England

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Toft Monks Human settlement in England

Toft Monks is a village and parish in Norfolk, England. It is located on the border of Norfolk and Suffolk about eleven miles southwest of Great Yarmouth and four miles north of Beccles.

Hales Human settlement in England

Hales is a small village in Norfolk, England. It covers an area of 3.99 km2 (1.54 sq mi) and had a population of 479 in 192 households as of the 2001 census, which had reduced to 469 at the 2011 census.

Buckenham Human settlement in England

Buckenham is a small village in the English county of Norfolk situated on the northern bank of the River Yare around 7 miles (11 km) south-east of Norwich. The village is the location of the RSPB Buckenham Marshes nature reserve.

Gillingham, Norfolk Human settlement in England

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Ashby, Suffolk Human settlement in England

Ashby is a hamlet and former civil parish, now in the parish of Somerleyton, Ashby and Herringfleet, in the East Suffolk district, in the county of Suffolk, England, about 5 12 miles (9 km) northwest of Lowestoft. The hamlet is near the county boundary with Norfolk and about 5 12 miles (9 km) south-southwest of Great Yarmouth. In 1961 the parish had a population of 65. In 1987 the parish was merged with Herringfleet and Somerleyton to form "Somerleyton, Ashby and Herringfleet".

The Yarmouth–Beccles line was a railway line which linked the Suffolk market town of Beccles with the Norfolk coastal resort of Yarmouth. Forming part of the East Suffolk Railway, the line was opened in 1859 and closed 100 years later in 1959.

North Cove Human settlement in England

North Cove is a village and civil parish in the East Suffolk district in the north of the English county of Suffolk. The village is on the A146 around 3 miles (4.8 km) east of Beccles and 5 miles (8.0 km) west of Lowestoft. It merges with the village of Barnby although the two parishes retain separate parish councils.

References

  1. The Broads (Map). 1:25,000. Explorer. Southampton: Ordnance Survey. 2005. § OL40. ISBN   0-319-23769-9.
  2. UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Haddiscoe Parish (1170216396)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics . Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  3. 1 2 Ekwall 1960 , Haddiscoe
  4. 1 2 3 Historic England. "Church of St Mary  (Grade I) (1169126)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  5. Historic England. "Church of St Matthias  (Grade I) (1306674)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  6. 1 2 Lewis 1931a, pp. 366–369.
  7. Historic England. "Toft Monks (detached) windpump  (Grade II) (1050525)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 16 March 2014.
  8. A listing for Brown's grave

Bibliography