List of professional wrestling promotions in Japan

Last updated

This is a list of professional wrestling promotions in Japan which includes both national and independent puroresu and joshi companies from the post-World War II period up to the present day.

Contents

Major promotions

Puroresu

NameLocationOwner(s)Years activeNotes
All Japan Pro Wrestling Yokohama Tsuyoki Fukuda1972–Affiliated with National Wrestling Alliance until 1990. [1] [2] [3]
DDT Pro-Wrestling Tokyo CyberAgent 1997–As of July 2020, DDT is promoted as one of the four brands under the CyberFight umbrella. [1] [4]
Dragon Gate Kobe Gaora 2004–Known as Toryumon Japan from 1997 to 2004. [1] [5]
New Japan Pro-Wrestling Tokyo Bushiroad 1972– [1] [6] [7]
Pro Wrestling Noah Tokyo CyberAgent [8] 2000–As of July 2020, NOAH is promoted as one of the four brands under the CyberFight umbrella. [1] [9] [10]

Joshi

NameLocationOwner(s)Years activeNotes
World Wonder Ring Stardom Tokyo Bushiroad 2010–

Independent promotions

Puroresu

NameLocationOwner(s)Years activeNotes
666  [ ja ] Tokyo Onryo 2003–Also known as Triple 6.
Active Advance Pro Wrestling Chiba Taka Michinoku 2002–Known as Kaientai Dojo and K-Dojo until 2019.
Asuka Pro Wrestling Tokyo Akira Shinose2014–Previously named Asuka Project until 2019. [11]
Big Japan Pro Wrestling Yokohama Eiji Tosaka1995–
Colega Pro Wrestling Osaka The Bodyguard 2021- [12]
Chō Sentō Puroresu FMW Greater Tokyo Area Akihito Ichihara
Yukihide Ueno
1989–2002
2015–
Previously named Frontier Martial Arts Wrestling. [1] [13] [14]
Dotonbori Pro Wrestling  [ ja ] Osaka Dotonbori Entertainment System2013- [15]
Dove Pro Wrestling  [ ja ] Hiroshima Gunso  [ ja ]2005–
Dradition Tokyo Tatsumi Fujinami 2008–
FREEDOMS Chigasaki Takashi Sasaki 2009– [16]
Ganbare☆Pro-Wrestling  [ ja ] Tokyo CyberAgent 2013-Originally a special event by parent company DDT, GanPro has since become its own promotion and as of July 2020, it is promoted as one of the four brands under the CyberFight umbrella, along with DDT. [17]
Gleat Yūrakuchō, Tokyo LIDET Entertainment2020–Founded by the former parent company of Pro Wrestling Noah, the promotion styles itself as something of a spiritual successor of the UWF and UWFi.
Hard Hit Tokyo Hikaru Sato 2015-Originally a series of events under DDT Pro-Wrestling, Hard Hit established itself as an independent promotion in 2015. [18]
Hitachi Pro Wrestling Kanto region 2008– [19]
Hokuto Pro Wrestling Hokkaido Crane Nakajo2004–
Lion's Gate Project Tokyo Bushiroad 2015–Developmental branch of New Japan Pro Wrestling.
Michinoku Pro Wrestling Morioka Jinsei Shinzaki 1993–
New Nemuro Pro Wrestling2006– [20]
Osaka Pro Wrestling Osaka Super Delfin
Yuji Sakagami
1998–
Ossan Style Wrestling Osaka 2019–Originally called Osaka Style Wrestling, the promotion restarted as Ossan Style Wrestling in 2020. [21]
Pro-Wrestling Basara Shinjuku, Tokyo Isami Kodaka 2015–Continuation of Union Pro Wrestling. Pro Wrestling Basara spun off from DDT Pro-Wrestling on January 1, 2020.
Pro Wrestling Dewa Tohoku region Lock Suzuki2004– [22]
Pro Wrestling Freedoms Tokyo Takashi Sasaki2009–
Pro Wrestling Secret Base  [ ja ] Tokyo Mototsugu Shimizu
Jun Ogawauchi
2009–Continuation of El Dorado Wrestling.
Pro-Wrestling Shi-En  [ ja ] Osaka Eiji Sahara2010– [23]
Pro Wrestling Zero1 Tokyo First On Stage Inc.2001– [1] [24] [25]
Professional Wrestling Just Tap Out Tokyo Taka Michinoku 2019–
Real Japan Pro Wrestling Tokyo Satoru Sayama 2005–
Tenryu Project Tokyo Genichiro Tenryu 2010–2015
2020–
Closed in 2015 after promoters retirement, re-established in 2020
Tokyo Gurentai Tokyo Nosawa Rongai
Mazada
2010–

Joshi

NameLocationOwner(s)Years activeNotes
Actwres girl'Z Tokyo Super Project Co. Ltd.2015–
Gatoh Move Tokyo [26] [27] Emi Sakura 2012–Formerly based in Thailand.
Ice Ribbon Warabi Neoplus2006–
Ladies Legend Pro-Wrestling-X Toshima Rumi Kazama
Shinobu Kandori
1992–
Marvelous  [ ja ] Funabashi Marvelcompany, Inc.2006–
Oz Academy Tokyo Mayumi Ozaki 1998–
Pro Wrestling Wave Tokyo Zabun Co, Ltd.2007–Sister promotion of Osaka Joshi Pro-Wrestling.
Pure-J Adachi, Tokyo Command Bolshoi 2017– [28] [29]
Seadlinnng Kawasaki Nanae Takahashi 2015–
Sendai Girls' Pro Wrestling Sendai Meiko Satomura 2005–
Tokyo Joshi Pro Wrestling Tokyo Tetsuya Koda and Nozomi2012–Subsidiary of DDT Pro-Wrestling. As of July 2020, TJPW, along with DDT, is promoted as one of the four brands under the CyberFight umbrella.
World Woman Pro-Wrestling Diana  [ ja ] Kawasaki, Kanagawa Kyoko Inoue 2011- [30]

Defunct promotions

Puroresu

NameLocationOwner(s)Years activeNotes
Apache Pro-Wrestling Army Tokyo Kintaro Kanemura 2004–2016
Battlarts Koshigaya Yuki Ishikawa1996–2011
Big Mouth Loud  [ ja ] Tokyo Fumihiko Uwai2005–2006
Diamond Ring Yoshikawa Kensuke Sasaki
Akira Hokuto
2003–2013Previously named Kensuke Office.
Dragondoor Project  [ ja ] Tokyo Noriaki Kawabata2005–2006
Fighting Network Rings Tokyo Akira Maeda 1991–2002Continuation of Newborn UWF.
Revived as a pure mixed martial arts promotion (The Outsider series) in 2008.
Global Professional Wrestling Alliance Tokyo Yoshiyuki Nakamura 2006–2009
Hustle Greater Tokyo Area Nobuhiko Takada 2004–2011 [31]
Inoki Genome Federation Tokyo Simon Inoki 2007–2019
International Wrestling Association of Japan Tokyo Tatsukuni Asano1994–2014Continuation of W*ING. [1] [32] [33]
International Wrestling Enterprise Tokyo Isao Yoshiwara1967–1981Associated with the American Wrestling Association from 1970, and the Japan Pro-Wrestling Commission with New Japan Pro Wrestling until 1981. [34]
Japan Wrestling Association Tokyo Rikidōzan 1953–1973Affiliated with the National Wrestling Alliance. Membership was transferred to AJPW. [1] [35] [36]
Kingdom Tokyo Ken Suzuki1997–1998Continuation of UWF International.
Onita Pro Tokyo Atsushi Onita 1999–2012Also known as Onita FMW in 2002.
Pro Wrestling El Dorado  [ ja ] Tokyo Noriaki Kawabata
Koji Fujinaga
2006–2008Continuation of Dragondoor Project.
Pro Wrestling Fujiwara Gumi Tokyo Yoshiaki Fujiwara
Masakatsu Funaki
Minoru Suzuki
1991–1995
Riki Pro Tokyo Riki Choshu
Katsuji Nagashima
2004–2010Also known as World Japan Pro Wrestling or Fighting of World Japan. [1] [37] [38]
Smash Tokyo Yoshihiro Tajiri
Akira Shoji
2010–2012Continuation of Hustle. [39]
Super World of Sports Tokyo Hachiro Tanaka1990–1992Associated with the World Wrestling Federation. [40]
Tokyo Pro Wrestling Tokyo Takashi Ishikawa1994–1996
Universal Wrestling Federation Matsumoto Hisashi Shinma1984–1986Revived as the Newborn UWF in 1988 and again in 1991 as Union of Wrestling Forces International (UWF International or UWFi).
Uwai Station Freestyle Pro-Wrestling  [ ja ] Tokyo Fumihiko Uwai2006–2007Continuation of Big Mouth Loud.
UWF International Tokyo Nobuhiko Takada1991–1996Continuation of Universal Wrestling Federation.
Union Pro Wrestling Shinjuku, Tokyo Naomi Susan
DDT Pro-Wrestling
1993–1995
2004–2015
Wrestle-1 Tokyo Keiji Mutoh 2013–2020 [41]
Wrestle Association "R" Tokyo Gen'ichiro Tenryu
Masatomo Takei
1992–2006 [42] [43]
Wrestling International New Generations Tokyo Kiyoshi Ibaragi
Victor Quiñonez
1991–1994Associated with the World Wrestling Council. [44] [45]
Wrestling Marvelous Future Tokyo Hayabusa 2002-2008 [46]
Wrestling New Classic Tokyo Yoshihiro Tajiri 2012–2014Continuation of Smash. Sister promotion of Reina Joshi Puroresu.

Joshi

NameLocationOwner(s)Years activeNotes
All Japan Women's Pro-Wrestling Tokyo Kunimatsu Matsunaga
Takashi Matsunaga
1972–2005 [1] [47] [48]
Arsion Tokyo Rossy Ogawa1997–2003 [49] [50]
Gaea Japan Tokyo Yuka Sugiyama
Chigusa Nagayo
1995–2005 [1] [51] [52]
Ibuki Tokyo 2005-2010 [53]
JDStar Tokyo Yoshimoto Kogyo Company
J Office Group
1995–2007 [54]
JWP Joshi Puroresu Tokyo Kiyoshi Shinozaki
Masatoshi Yamamoto
1992–2017 [55] [56]
NEO Japan Ladies Pro-Wrestling Yokohama Kyoko Inoue 1997–2010

See also

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