Office of Naval Research

Last updated

Office of Naval Research
AbbreviationONR
FormationAugust 1, 1946;76 years ago (1946-08-01)
Headquarters Ballston, Arlington, Virginia, US
Locations
Coordinates 38°52′51″N77°06′31″W / 38.8808°N 77.1086°W / 38.8808; -77.1086 Coordinates: 38°52′51″N77°06′31″W / 38.8808°N 77.1086°W / 38.8808; -77.1086
Secretary General
U.S. Secretary of the Navy
Lorin C. Selby
Parent organization
United States Department of the Navy
Subsidiaries United States Naval Research Laboratory
Website www.onr.navy.mil

The Office of Naval Research (ONR) is an organization within the United States Department of the Navy responsible for the science and technology programs of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Established by Congress in 1946, its mission is to plan, foster, and encourage scientific research to maintain future naval power and preserve national security. It carries this out through funding and collaboration with schools, universities, government laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit organizations, and overseeing the Naval Research Laboratory, the corporate research laboratory for the Navy and Marine Corps. NRL conducts a broad program of scientific research, technology and advanced development.

Contents

ONR Headquarters is in the Ballston neighborhood of Arlington, Virginia.

ONR Global has offices overseas in Santiago, Sao Paulo, London, Prague, Singapore, and Tokyo.

Overview

ONR was authorized by an Act of Congress, Public Law 588, and subsequently approved by President Harry S. Truman on August 1, 1946. Its stated mission is "planning, fostering, and encouraging scientific research in recognition of its paramount importance as related to the maintenance of future naval power and the preservation of national security." [1] [2]

Today, ONR carries this out through funding with grants and contracts scientists and engineers who perform basic research, technology development, and advanced technology demonstrations

ONR's Science and Technology Portfolio is allocated as follows: "10% Quick Reaction & Other S&T, 30% Acquisition Enablers, 10% Leap Ahead Innovations, 40% Discovery & Invention (Basic and Applied Science), 10% Other." [3]

Organization

ONR reports to the U.S. Secretary of the Navy through the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition. The Chief of Naval Research is Rear Admiral Lorin C. Selby and the Vice Chief of Naval Research is Brigadier General Benjamin T. Watson, United States Marine Corps, who also serves as Director of United States Marine Corps Futures Directorate and Commanding General of the United States Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory.

ONR executes its mission through science and technology departments, corporate programs, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and the ONR Global office.

Science and Technology Departments

ONR has six science and technology departments that support a broad range of subjects, which span such efforts as combating terrorism, oceanography, sea warfare, and life sciences. These fund basic research programs, primarily through U.S. universities; technology research programs, primarily through government and nongovernment laboratories; and advanced technology demonstration programs, primarily through U.S. industry and companies.

Additionally, ONR has an Office of Transition that supports technology transitions to the Navy and Marine Corps; a Small Business Innovative Research Office that encourages small businesses to develop and commercialize products in support of ONR’s mission; a Future Naval Capabilities Program that works to provide technologies to close warfighting gaps; and a Corporate Programs Office that supports cross-disciplinary research and education programs. As of February, 2020, ONR oversees NavalX, the US Navy Agility Cell founded by James “Hondo” Geurts in 2018.

ONR staffer discusses paid internship opportunities with a visitor to the Department of the Navy Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) Program exhibit. Office of Naval Research recruitment.jpg
ONR staffer discusses paid internship opportunities with a visitor to the Department of the Navy Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) Program exhibit.

ONR Corporate Programs: Research & Education

ONR supports many corporate research and education programs, including:

The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) was founded in 1923 and today employs over 2,500 scientists and engineers. [9] NRL is the corporate research laboratory for the Navy and Marine Corps and conducts a broad program of scientific research, technology and advanced development. It has a prestigious history, including the development of the first U.S. radar system, [10] synthetic lubricants (for modern gas turbine engines), over-the-horizon radar, [11] the first U.S. surveillance satellite, and the Clementine space mission. A few of the Laboratory's current specialties include plasma physics, space physics, materials science, and tactical electronic warfare.

ONR Global

ONR Global regional offices are located in:

ONR Global is a supporter of the Global Security Challenge at the London Business School.

Research

Sea Fighter (FSF-1), August 2005 Sea Fighter FSF1.jpg
Sea Fighter (FSF-1), August 2005

ONR's investments have enabled many firsts, including the launch of the first U.S. intel satellite; the development of SEALAB I/II; the validation of the GPS concept and launch of the first GPS satellite; the first global atmospheric prediction model; GWOT support through various quick response programs; and, most recently, the electromagnetic railgun, the Infantry Immersive Trainer, and super-conducting motors.[ citation needed ] Others include:

The ONR has also sponsored symposia such as the Symposium on Principles of Self-Organization at Allerton Park in 1960. [14]

ONR projects and programs

Tomahawk TLAM missile launching US Navy 030322-N-1035L-006 The guided missile destroyer USS Milius (DDG 69) launches a Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) toward Iraq.jpg
Tomahawk TLAM missile launching

Alleged

See also

Related organizations and agencies

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">United States Naval Research Laboratory</span> Military unit

The United States Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is the corporate research laboratory for the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. It was founded in 1923 and conducts basic scientific research, applied research, technological development and prototyping. The laboratory's specialties include plasma physics, space physics, materials science, and tactical electronic warfare. NRL is one of the first US government scientific R&D laboratories, having opened in 1923 at the instigation of Thomas Edison, and is currently under the Office of Naval Research.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Air Force Research Laboratory</span> Scientific research organization for the US Air Force and US Space Force

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is a scientific research organization operated by the United States Air Force Materiel Command dedicated to leading the discovery, development, and integration of aerospace warfighting technologies, planning and executing the Air Force science and technology program, and providing warfighting capabilities to United States air, space, and cyberspace forces. It controls the entire Air Force science and technology research budget which was $2.4 billion in 2006.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">United States Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory</span> Military unit

The United States Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory (MCWL) was established in 1995, at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia. The organization was originally known as the Commandant's Warfighting Laboratory. The battle lab is part of Combat Development and Integration—under Headquarters, United States Marine Corps—and its stated purpose is to improve current and future naval expeditionary warfare capabilities across the spectrum of conflict for current and future operating forces.

SIMDIS is a software toolset developed by Code 5770 at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The software provides 2D and 3D interactive graphical and video displays of live and postprocessed simulation, test, and operational data. SIMDIS is a portmanteau of simulation and display.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Marine Corps Systems Command</span> Military unit

Marine Corps Systems Command (MCSC) is the acquisition command of the United States Marine Corps, made up of Marines, sailors, civilians and contractors. As the only systems command in the Marine Corps, MCSC serves as Head of Contracting Authority and exercises technical authority for all Marine Corps ground weapon and information technology programs. MCSC is headquartered at Marine Corps Base Quantico.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Merrill Skolnik</span> Radar researcher

Merrill Skolnik was an American researcher in the area of radar systems and the author or editor of a number of standard texts in the field. He is best known for his introductory text "Introduction to Radar Systems" and for editing the "Radar Handbook".

Dylan Schmorrow is an American scientist and retired United States Defense Official. He is currently the chief scientist at Soar Technology, Inc.. He is a retired US Navy captain, and served as the deputy director of the Human Performance, Training, and BioSystems Research Directorate at the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, Research & Engineering at Office of the Secretary of Defense. He was also specialty leader of the Aerospace Experimental Psychologist community and an acquisition professional in the Naval Acquisition Corps.

The Department Of the Navy Acquisition Intern Program is a civilian professional hiring program. The Naval Acquisition Career Center manages several hundred interns at any given time.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Operational Test and Evaluation Force</span> Military unit

The Operational Test and Evaluation Force (OPTEVFOR) serves as an independent and objective agency within the United States Navy for the operational testing and evaluation (OT&E) of naval aviation, surface warfare, submarine warfare, C4I, cryptologic, and space systems in support Navy and U.S. Department of Defense acquisition programs.

Marine Corps Operational Test and Evaluation Activity (MCOTEA) is the independent Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E) authority for the U.S. Marine Corps. MCOTEA plans, executes, and evaluates testing of material solutions against warfighter capabilities, under prescribed realistic conditions and doctrine, to determine Operational Effectiveness, Operational Suitability, and Operational Survivability (OE/OS/OSur) of all new equipment for the Corps in support of its acquisition process. MCOTEA is based at Marine Corps Base Quantico. Unlike most Marine Corps organizations, MCOTEA has a Director instead of a Commander.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">TacSat-4</span>

TacSat-4 is the third in a series of U.S. military experimental technology and communication satellites. The United States Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is the program manager. The Office of Naval Research (ONR) sponsored the development of the payload and funded the first year of operations. The Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E) funded the standardized spacecraft bus and the Operationally Responsive Space Office (ORS) funded the launch that will be performed by the Air Force's Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Delores M. Etter</span>

Delores Maria Etter is a former United States Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Science and Technology from 1998 to 2001 and former Assistant Secretary of the Navy for research, science, and technology from 2005 to 2007.

The systems commands, abbreviated as SysCom or SYSCOM, are the materiel agencies of the United States Department of the Navy, responsible for the design, construction, and maintenance of military systems such as ships, aircraft, facilities, and weapons. The systems commands replaced the Navy bureau system in 1966 and report to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition. The current Navy systems commands are:

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Interactive Scenario Builder</span>

Interactive Scenario Builder (Builder) is a modeling and simulation, three-dimensional application developed by the Advanced Tactical Environmental Simulation Team (ATEST) at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) that aids in understanding radio frequency (RF) and electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) propagation.

The Radio Materiel School (RMS), operated by the United States Navy, was the first electronics training facility of America’s military organizations. During the 1920s and 1930s, it produced the core of senior maintenance specialists for the Navy’s communication equipment that “paved the way to United States world leadership in electronics.”

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition)</span>

The Assistant Secretary of the Navy is a civilian office of the United States Department of the Navy. The Assistant Secretary of the Navy requires Senate confirmation, and engages in duties as directed by the United States Secretary of the Navy.

Bhakta B. Rath is an Indian American material physicist and Head of the Materials Science and Component Technology of the United States Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the corporate research laboratory for the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. He is the chief administrative officer for program planning, interdisciplinary coordination, supervision and control of research and is the associate director of research for Materials Science and Component Technology at NRL.

References

  1. ONR Public Affairs (Fall 2011). "Office of Naval Research Celebrates 65 Years of Pioneering Science & Technology" (PDF). InfoDomain: 42. Archived (PDF) from the original on 23 December 2019. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  2. "10 U.S. Code § 8022 - Office of Naval Research: duties". LII / Legal Information Institute. Retrieved 15 July 2020.
  3. Carr, jr., RADM Nevin P. "The Office of Naval Research". Office of Naval Research. Retrieved 17 September 2019.
  4. "Naval Research Enterprise Internship Program". Office of Naval Research. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  5. "DoD National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship Program". Office of Naval Research. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  6. "HBCU/MI Program". Office of Naval Research. Retrieved 23 November 2019.
  7. "Science and Engineering Apprentice Program". Office of Naval Research. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  8. "Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation". Office of Naval Research. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  9. "About NRL - U.S. Naval Research Laboratory". www.nrl.navy.mil. Retrieved 5 September 2017.
  10. "Development of the Radar Principle - U.S. Naval Research Laboratory". www.nrl.navy.mil. Archived from the original on 24 October 2017. Retrieved 5 September 2017.
  11. "Over-the-Horizon Radar - U.S. Naval Research Laboratory". www.nrl.navy.mil. Archived from the original on 17 April 2017. Retrieved 5 September 2017.
  12. "United States Department of Defense". www.defenselink.mil. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  13. "Office of Naval Research". www.onr.navy.mil. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  14. "Frontispiece". International Tracts in Computer Science and Technology and their Application. 9 (Principles of Self-Organization). 1962.
  15. "Information Sheet: Philadelphia Experiment". US Naval History and Heritage Command FAQ. Archived from the original on 18 October 2014.