Premier of British Columbia

Last updated
Premier of British Columbia
Premier ministre de la Colombie-Britannique
Coat of Arms of British Columbia.svg
Flag of British Columbia.svg
John Horgan 2015.jpg
Incumbent
John Horgan

since July 18, 2017
Office of the Premier
Style
Status Head of Government
Member of
Reports to
Seat Victoria
Appointer Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia
(with the confidence of the British Columbia Legislature)
Term length At Her Majesty's pleasure
(contingent on the premier's ability to command confidence in the Legislative Assembly)
FormationNovember 13, 1871
First holder John Foster McCreight
Deputy Deputy premier of British Columbia
Salary$104,009.66 plus $93,608.69 (indemnity and allowances) [1]
Website Office of the Premier

The premier of British Columbia is the first minister, head of government, and de facto chief executive for the Canadian province of British Columbia. Until the early 1970s, the title prime minister of British Columbia was often used. The word premier is derived from the French word of the same spelling, meaning "first"; and ultimately from the Latin word primarius, meaning "primary". [2]

Contents

Although the premier is the day-to-day leader of the provincial government, they receive the authority to govern from the Crown (represented in British Columbia by the province's lieutenant governor). Formally, the executive branch of government in British Columbia is said to be vested in the lieutenant governor acting by and with the advice and consent of the executive council.

The position of premier is not described in Canadian constitutional statutes. By convention, the leader of the political party that has the support of a majority of members of the Legislative Assembly is usually invited by the lieutenant governor to form the government.

Formal responsibilities

The responsibilities of the premier usually include:

President of the Executive Council

Generally, the premier selects MLAs from their party to be appointed ministers of the Crown by the Lieutenant Governor. Cabinet appointees are designated ministers in charge of government ministries; they are responsible for the day-to-day activities of individual government ministries such as the Ministry of Forests, and for proposing new laws or changing existing ones. The premier may also choose an individual who is not an MLA to be a cabinet minister, although on the rare occasion that this does happen, the practice is that the minister proceeds to obtain a seat in the House. The appointment of an MLA to Cabinet is based on their ability and expertise and is also influenced by political considerations such as geography, gender and ethnicity.

A minister remains in office solely at the pleasure of the premier. The resignation of the premier also triggers the resignation of the other members of Cabinet. [3]

See also

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  1. The Queen of Canada
  2. The Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia
  3. The Premier of British Columbia
  4. The Chief Justice of British Columbia
  5. Former Lieutenant Governors of British Columbia
    1. Hon. Iona Campagnolo PC OC OBC
    2. Hon. Steven Point OBC
    3. Hon. Judith Guichon OBC
  6. Former Premiers of British Columbia
    1. Bill Vander Zalm
    2. Rita Johnston
    3. Mike Harcourt
    4. Glen Clark
    5. Dan Miller
    6. Hon. Ujjal Dosanjh PC
    7. Gordon Campbell OBC
    8. Christy Clark
  7. The Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia
  8. The Members of the Executive Council of British Columbia
  9. The Leader of the Official Opposition of British Columbia
  10. Members of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada resident in British Columbia, with precedence given to members of the federal cabinet
  11. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of British Columbia
  12. Church representatives of faith communities
  13. The Justices of the Court of Appeal of British Columbia with precedence to be governed by the date of appointment
  14. The Puisne Justices of the Supreme Court of British Columbia with precedence to be governed by the date of appointment
  15. The Judges of the Supreme Court of British Columbia with precedence to be governed by the date of appointment
  16. The Members of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia with precedence to be governed by the date of their first election to the legislature
  17. The Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of British Columbia (Vacant)
  18. The Commander Maritime Forces Pacific
  19. The Heads of Consular Posts with jurisdiction in British Columbia with precedence to be governed by Article 16 of the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations
  20. The Mayor of Victoria
  21. The Mayor of Vancouver
  22. The Chancellors of the University of British Columbia, the University of Victoria and Simon Fraser University, respectively.
    1. Hon. Steven Point OBC
    2. Shelagh Rogers, OC
    3. Tamara Vrooman, OBC

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References

  1. "MLA Remuneration and Expenses". www.leg.bc.ca. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  2. Onions, C.T. Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. 1985.
  3. Much of the information above is adapted from the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia website article "Discover more about the role of an MLA". Please see the external links.