Republic of Ireland national football B team

Last updated
Republic of Ireland B
Nickname(s) The Boys in Green
Association Football Association of Ireland
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coachPat Devlin
Captain Alex Bruce
Top scorer Christy Doyle
Daryl Clare
David Kelly
Jackie Hennessy
Neale Fenn
Niall Quinn (all 2 goals each)
Home stadium Dalymount Park
Lansdowne Road
Tolka Park
Turner's Cross
Carlisle Grounds
FIFA code IRL
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First colours
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Second colours
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Third colours
First international
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 1–0 Romania  Flag of Romania (1952-1965).svg
(Dalymount Park, Dublin, Republic of Ireland; October 20, 1957)
Biggest win
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 4–1 England  Flag of England.svg
(Turner's Cross, Cork, Republic of Ireland; March 27, 1990)
Biggest defeat
Flag of England.svg  England 2–0 Republic of Ireland  Flag of Ireland.svg
(Anfield, Liverpool, England; December 1, 1994)

Republic of Ireland B is the reserve team of the Republic of Ireland national football team. There are no competitions for B teams. However, since 1957 the Football Association of Ireland has arranged occasional friendlies.

Contents

History

Early B internationals

The FAI first introduced B internationals during the 1950s. In an era when League of Ireland players were getting fewer opportunities to break into the senior team, these games were seen as a chance for these players to gain some international experience. The Republic of Ireland B played their first game on October 20, 1957 at Dalymount Park against Romania B. They held the visitors to a 1–1 draw. Three days later, on October 23, the Romanians lost 6–0 to a Northern Ireland B team. [1]

In August 1958 a Republic of Ireland B team travelled to Reykjavík and beat Iceland 3–2. Then in September 1960, Iceland made a return visit to Dalymount Park, this time losing 2–1. On both occasions Iceland fielded their senior team and the Football Association of Iceland regard these games as full internationals. [2] [3] In between the two games against Iceland, the Republic of Ireland B also beat South Africa 1–0 at Dalymount Park. The South Africans also regard this as a full international. Several League of Ireland players who played in these games subsequently played for the senior Republic of Ireland team. These included Christy Doyle, who had scored against both Iceland and South Africa, Jackie Hennessy who had scored twice against Iceland and Liam Tuohy.

After the game against Iceland in 1960 it would be thirty years before a Republic of Ireland B team officially played again. However, on May 24, 1971, the FAI, celebrating its Golden Jubilee arranged a special game at Lansdowne Road. This should have been a full international, however their opponents, England, only sent a B team. Steve Heighway scored for an unofficial Republic of Ireland B team in the subsequent 1–1 draw. [4]

1990s

Under Jack Charlton, B internationals were revived and during the 1990s the Republic of Ireland B played England B twice. They recorded their biggest win to date when they beat England B 4-1 at Turner's Cross on March 27, 1990. However four years later England B avenged this defeat when they beat the Republic of Ireland B 2–0 at Anfield on December 1, 1994. This remains their biggest defeat to date. [5]

In between the two games against England B, the Republic of Ireland B also beat Denmark B 2–0 at Tolka Park on February 12, 1992. Under Mick McCarthy, the Republic of Ireland B played a further three games, including two against a League of Ireland XI and one against a Northern Ireland B team. [1]

From 2006

In April 2006 the FAI announced that Pat Devlin would join the management team of Steve Staunton as manager of the Republic of Ireland B and as League of Ireland co-ordinator. The intention was for Devlin to monitor players in the league, report on potential international players and introduce them to international football at B level. [6] Since then the Republic of Ireland B has played and drawn with Scotland B twice. In 2008, a team playing as Republic of Ireland XI overcame Nottingham Forest at Dalymount Park. This team was, in effect, an Ireland B team.

Results [7]

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg 11 Romania B Flag of Romania (1952-1965).svg
Neville Soccerball shade.svgSemenescu Soccerball shade.svg
Dalymount Park, Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Friendly
Attendance: 21,500
Referee: Kelly (England)

Iceland Flag of Iceland.svg 23 Flag of Ireland.svg Republic of Ireland B
Björgvinsson Soccerball shade.svg
Þórðarson Soccerball shade.svg
Doyle Soccerball shade.svg
Nolan Soccerball shade.svg
McCann

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg 10Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg  South Africa
Doyle

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg 21 Flag of Iceland.svg Iceland
Hennessy Soccerball shade.svgSoccerball shade.svg
Beck Soccerball shade.svg

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg [8] 11 Flag of England.svg England B
Heighway Soccerball shade.svg Wagstaff Soccerball shade.svg

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg 41 Flag of England.svg England B
McLoughlin Soccerball shade.svg
Kelly Soccerball shade.svg(pen.)
Quinn Soccerball shade.svgSoccerball shade.svg
Atkinson Soccerball shade.svg
Turner's Cross, Cork, Republic of Ireland
Friendly
Attendance: 10,000
Referee: Cooper (Wales)

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg 20 Flag of Denmark.svg Denmark B
Fenlon Soccerball shade.svg
Kelly Soccerball shade.svg
Tolka Park, Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Friendly
Attendance: 4,000
Referee: Gifford (Wales)

England B Flag of England.svg 20 Flag of Ireland.svg Republic of Ireland B
Cole Soccerball shade.svg
Fowler Soccerball shade.svg
Anfield, Liverpool, England
Friendly
Attendance: 7,431
Referee: Hugh Dallas (Scotland)

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg 11 Flag of Ireland.svg League of Ireland XI
Dominic Foley Soccerball shade.svg Pat Morley Soccerball shade.svg

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg 01 Ulster Banner.svg Northern Ireland B
O'Boyle Soccerball shade.svg
Tolka Park, Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Friendly
Attendance: 10,000
Referee: Richards (Wales)

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg 43 Flag of Ireland.svg League of Ireland XI
Fenn Soccerball shade.svgSoccerball shade.svg
Clare Soccerball shade.svgSoccerball shade.svg
Coughlan Soccerball shade.svg
Gormley Soccerball shade.svg(pen.)
Tony Cousins Soccerball shade.svg

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg 00 Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland B
Report

Scotland B Flag of Scotland.svg 11 Flag of Ireland.svg Republic of Ireland B
Howard Soccerball shade.svg Report Byrne Soccerball shade.svg
Excelsior Stadium, Airdrie, Scotland
Friendly
Referee: Joseph Attard (Malta)

Republic of Ireland B Flag of Ireland.svg 20 Flag of England.svg Nottingham Forest F.C.
Folan Soccerball shade.svg
Keogh Soccerball shade.svg
Report

See also

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References