Rugby union in Tuvalu

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Rugby union is played in Tuvalu . [1] Unlike most South Pacific islands, rugby union is largely played on an informal basis alongside football (soccer), which is the main sport played by Tuvaluans. [2]

Contents

The Tuvalu Rugby Union, an organising body for Rugby Union, was established in 2007 with the intention of forming a national team. [3]

History

The Tuvalu Rugby Union organises a rugby tournament for teams from each island, and also selects a national team. [4] Tuvalu participated in the Rugby Sevens competition in the XIVth Pacific Games in 2011. [5] It is also a featured sport at the Tuvalu Games.

On the main island of Funafuti a rugby union competition is organised between teams based on the home island of the team members, such as the 'Niutao Sharks'. [6]

Tuvalu's main problems are geographical - its population of 11,992 makes it the third-least-populated independent country in the world, with only Vatican City and Nauru having fewer inhabitants. It is also one of the smallest member by population of the United Nations. In terms of physical land size, at just 26 square kilometres (10 sq mi) Tuvalu is the fourth smallest country in the world, larger only than the Vatican City—0.44 km2; Monaco—1.95 km2 and Nauru—21 km2. It comprises four reef islands and five true atolls. All of this makes a rugby infrastructure difficult to construct. [3]

Tuvalu's close relationship with New Zealand and Australia, however, ensures that rugby union gets a lot of media coverage in Tuvalu.

See also

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Tuvalu national rugby sevens team

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Tuvalu Rugby Union

The Tuvalu Rugby Union, or TRU, is the governing body for rugby union in Tuvalu. It was established in 2007 and is a full member of the Federation of Oceania Rugby Unions (FORU), which is the regional governing body for rugby in Oceania.

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Tuvalu Athletics Association

The Tuvalu Athletics Association (TAA) is the governing body for the sport of athletics in the Tuvalu.

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The Nauru national rugby sevens team made its international debut at the 2015 Pacific Games in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

The Tuvalu Weightlifting Federation (TWF) is the organisation recognised by the International Weightlifting Federation as the weightlifting federation of Tuvalu.

References

  1. "Paradise in peril - King Tide diary". BBC News. 25 January 2008.
  2. https://www.fifa.com/aboutfifa/federation/insidefifa/news/newsid=886994.html
  3. 1 2 Lalua, Silafaga (10 January 2007). "Rugby Union starts up". Tuvalu-News.TV. Archived from the original on 18 October 2012. Retrieved 31 October 2012.
  4. "In sports…". Tuvalu-News.TV. 1 November 2006. Retrieved 31 October 2012.
  5. "Rugby sevens at the 2011 Pacific Games". XIVth Pacific Games. September 2011. Archived from the original on 30 August 2012. Retrieved 29 Nov 2011.
  6. "Andy Browning, I think we're going to need a bigger boat…". Andy Browning blog. Retrieved 16 December 2012.