Scotland national amateur football team

Last updated

Scotland Amateurs
Association Scottish Football Association (1926–1949, 1954–1974),
Scottish Amateur Football Association (1949–1954)
Most caps Billy Neil (45)
Top scorer Donald Ford, Peter Buchanan (11)
FIFA code SCO
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First colours
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Second colours
First international
England Amateurs Flag of England.svg 1–4 Scotland Amateurs Flag of Scotland.svg
(Filbert Street, Leicester; 18 December 1926)
Biggest win
Scotland Amateurs Flag of Scotland.svg 6–0 Ireland Amateurs Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg
(Celtic Park, Glasgow; 28 January 1933)
Biggest defeat
England Amateurs Flag of England.svg 8–3 Scotland Amateurs Flag of Scotland.svg
(Champion Hill, Dulwich; 11 March 1939)

The Scotland national amateur football team was the amateur representative team for Scotland at football. It was formed in 1926 and continued until 1974.

An amateur, from French amateur "lover of", is generally considered a person who pursues a particular activity or field of study independently from their source of income. Amateurs and their pursuits are also described as popular, informal, self-taught, user-generated, DIY, and hobbyist.

Scotland country in Northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

Contents

History

Origins and first match (1893–1926)

Following the adoption of professionalism in 1893, the Scotland national football team continued to field both professional and amateur players, but by the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, the number of amateurs winning international caps was in decline. [1] Between the formation of the SAFA in 1909 and 1926, the SFA turned down requests from the SAFA, the FA and the FFF to stage international matches featuring a Scottish team made up of purely amateur players. [2] One reason was that a Scottish amateur national team featuring no players from wholly amateur Scottish League First Division club Queen's Park would not be in the national interest, due to the prospective Scotland amateur matches clashing with Queen's Park's. [2] In August 1926, the SAFA announced that the first Scotland amateur international match would take place against their English counterparts on 18 December that year at Filbert Street, with the team's selection being determined by the SFA. [2] In front of a 10,000 crowd, Scotland won the match 4–1, courtesy of two goals from Laurie McBain and one each from George Jessiman and James Crawford. [3]

Scotland national football team mens association football team representing Scotland

The Scotland national football team represents Scotland in international football and is controlled by the Scottish Football Association. It competes in the three major professional tournaments, the FIFA World Cup, UEFA Nations League and the UEFA European Championship. Scotland, as a constituent country of the United Kingdom, is not a member of the International Olympic Committee and therefore the national team does not compete in the Olympic Games. The majority of Scotland's home matches are played at the national stadium, Hampden Park.

Scottish Amateur Football Association

The Scottish Amateur Football Association (SAFA) is the organising body for amateur football across Scotland. An affiliate of the Scottish Football Association, the SAFA has in turn 50 regional associations affiliated to it and some 67 different league competitions organised by these associations. There is estimated to be over 35,000 amateur footballers in Scotland, and all of their competitions are co-ordinated at some level by the Scottish Amateur Football Association. The SAFA was formed in 1909 with the purpose of legislating for and fostering the amateur level of football in Scotland.

Scottish Football Association governing body of association football in Scotland

The Scottish Football Association, is the governing body of football in Scotland and has the ultimate responsibility for the control and development of football in Scotland. Members of the SFA include clubs in Scotland, affiliated national associations as well as local associations. It was formed in 1873, making it the second oldest national football association in the world. It is not to be confused with the "Scottish Football Union", which is the name that the SRU was known by until the 1920s.

Pre-war (1926–1939)

Between 1926 and 1939, Scottish League First Division club Queen's Park provided the majority of the players for the Scotland amateur team, with many of the players winning full international caps as well. [1] With England as the biggest opponent and crowd draw amongst the Home Nations, the strongest possible team was selected and often included an all-Queen's Park XI. [1] In the same period, Scotland played regular friendly matches against the Wales and Ireland amateur representative teams and the matches were used to experiment with lineups featuring amateur players from other Scottish League clubs, in addition to amateurs playing in the Highland League, East of Scotland League, the Scottish Junior leagues, for Scottish Universities and in England. [1] Friendly matches were played versus France and Denmark in 1932. [1] [2]

Home Nations

The home nations, refers collectively to England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, and in certain sports includes the whole island of Ireland. The term "Home Nations" is used in this second sense partly because Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland have a unified association structure in certain sports, such as the Irish Rugby Football Union and Cricket Ireland. Formerly the phrase was applied in general in this same wider sense, such as the period between 1801 and 1922, when the whole island of Ireland was part of the United Kingdom. The synonymous "Home Countries" is also sometimes used.

The Wales national amateur football team was the amateur representative team for Wales at football. It was formed in 1908 and continued until 1974.

The Northern Ireland national amateur football team was the amateur representative team for Northern Ireland at football. It was formed in 1906 and continued until 1974.

In its first entry into the unofficial British Amateur Championship in the 1927–28 season, [4] Scotland finished as runners-up to England and won the competition for the first time during the 1929–30 season, finishing undefeated. [5] Further victories followed in the 1933–34, 1935–36 and 1936–37 seasons, [6] before the outbreak of the Second World War in August 1939 caused the cessation of amateur international football. [1] Scotland's penultimate match before the declaration of war resulted in its heaviest defeat, 8–3 versus England at Champion Hill on 11 March 1939. [7]

When World War II was declared in 1939, it had a negative effect on association football; competitions were suspended and players signed up to fight, resulting in the deaths of many players.

Champion Hill football stadium in East Dulwich

Champion Hill is a football stadium in East Dulwich in the London Borough of Southwark. It is the home ground of Dulwich Hamlet, with Millwall Lionesses groundsharing.

Post-war (1939–1974)

Following the end of the Second World War in 1945, the Scottish amateur team did not play again until 1949. [1] The SAFA assumed responsibility for team selection and Scotland's first match in a decade took place versus Ireland at Grosvenor Park on 16 March 1949, with John Boyd scoring a late equaliser to salvage a 2–2 draw. [8] The team would win just two more British Amateur Championships over the next 25 years, in the 1951–52 and 1961–62 seasons. [1] Starting in 1952, amateur internationals were regularly staged against non-Home Nations opposition and two years later, the SFA once again became responsible for team selection. [1] The team entered two competitions in 1963, the FA Centenary Amateur Tournament and the Uhuru Cup in Kenya and finished as winners and runners-up respectively. [1] Scotland finished as runners-up in the 1966–67 UEFA Nations Amateur Cup, losing 2–1 to Austria at the Lluís Sitjar Stadium in Palma, Majorca. [1] The team played its final match on 5 April 1974, a 1–1 British Amateur Championship draw with England at Highfield Road. [9] The team ceased to exist later that year, when the FA abolished the distinction between amateurism and professionalism in domestic football. [1]

John Alan Boyd is a Scottish former footballer who represented Great Britain at the 1948 Summer Olympics. Boyd played as a winger in the Scottish Football League for Queen's Park, Aberdeen and East Fife between 1946 and 1959.

Kenya republic in East Africa

Kenya, officially the Republic of Kenya, is a country in Africa with 47 semiautonomous counties governed by elected governors. At 580,367 square kilometres (224,081 sq mi), Kenya is the world's 48th largest country by total area. With a population of more than 52.2 million people, Kenya is the 27th most populous country. Kenya's capital and largest city is Nairobi while its oldest city and first capital is the coastal city of Mombasa. Kisumu City is the third largest city and a critical inland port at Lake Victoria. Other important urban centres include Nakuru and Eldoret.

Estadio Lluís Sitjar was a multi-use stadium in Palma de Mallorca, Spain. It was used mostly for football matches and hosted the home matches of RCD Mallorca. The stadium was able to hold 18,000 people and opened in 1945. RCD Mallorca left the stadium in 1999 when ONO Estadi opened, but the reserve team RCD Mallorca B continued to use the stadium until 2007, before they to moved on to Son Bibiloni, the club's training complex to the north of Palma.

Venues

The Scotland amateur team predominantly played its home matches at Hampden Park, Glasgow – a ground also home to the full Scotland national team and Queen's Park. [1] Matches outside Glasgow were mainly played in Kilmarnock, Aberdeen and Dumfries. [1]

Hampden Park football stadium

Hampden Park is a football stadium in the Mount Florida area of Glasgow, Scotland. The 51,866-capacity venue serves as the national stadium of football in Scotland. It is the normal home venue of the Scotland national football team and amateur Scottish league club Queen's Park F.C. and regularly hosts the latter stages of the Scottish Cup and Scottish League Cup competitions. It is also used for music concerts and other sporting events, such as when it was reconfigured as an athletics stadium for the 2014 Commonwealth Games.

Glasgow City and council area in Scotland

Glasgow is the most populous city in Scotland, and the third most populous city in the United Kingdom, as of the 2017 estimated city population of 621,020. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow City Council. Glasgow is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands. Inhabitants of the city are referred to as "Glaswegians" or "Weegies". It is the fourth most visited city in the UK. Glasgow is also known for the Glasgow patter, a distinct dialect of the Scots language that is noted for being difficult to understand by those from outside the city.

Kilmarnock burgh in East Ayrshire, Scotland

Kilmarnock is a large burgh in East Ayrshire, Scotland with a population of 46,350, making it the 15th most populated place in Scotland and the second largest town in Ayrshire. The River Irvine runs through its eastern section, and the Kilmarnock Water passes through it, giving rise to the name 'Bank Street'.

Records

Most appearances

#NamePositionYearsClub(s)AppearancesGoals
1Neil, Billy Billy Neil CH1957–1969 Airdrieonians, Queen's Park 450
2Cromar, Bert Bert Cromar WH/FB1951–1963 Queen's Park 354
3Hopper, Niall Niall Hopper FW1956–1969 Queen's Park 276
4Grant, Doug Doug Grant WH1959–1968 Elgin City, Queen's Park 235
5Barr, Tommy Tommy Barr FB1965–1971 Lanark United, Queen's Park 220
6Hastie, Willie Willie Hastie WH/FB1949–1957 Queen's Park 210
7Mackay, Malky Malky Mackay FW1966–1971 Queen's Park 206
8Omand, Willie Willie Omand WH/FW1953–1961 Queen's Park 196
9Buchanan, Peter Peter Buchanan FW1961–1966 Queen's Park 1711
10Harnett, Ian Ian Harnett FB1953–1960 Queen's Park 160

Most goals

#NamePositionYearsClubGoalsAppearances
1Ford, Donald Donald Ford FW1965–1966 Heart of Midlothian 119
2Buchanan, Peter Peter Buchanan FW1961–1966 Queen's Park 1117
3Dodds, John John Dodds FW1930–1936 Queen's Park 98
4Lorimer, Peter Peter Lorimer WH1963 Leeds United 77
5Kyle, Joseph Joseph Kyle CF/IF1935–1939 Queen's Park 711
6Boardman, George George Boardman IF1963 Queen's Park 64
7Campbell, Ian Ian Campbell IF1966–1971 Queen's Park 612
8Omand, Willie Willie Omand WH/FW1953–1961 Queen's Park 619
9Mackay, Malky Malky Mackay FW1966–1971 Queen's Park 620
10Hopper, Niall Niall Hopper FW/RH1956–1969 Queen's Park 627

Honours and achievements

Related Research Articles

Scottish Junior Football Association

The Scottish Junior Football Association (SJFA) is an affiliated national association of the Scottish Football Association and is the governing body for the junior grade of football in Scotland. The term "junior" refers to the level of football played, not the age of the players. The closest equivalent terminology would be non-League football in England, the difference being that non-league football in Scotland is not similarly integrated into its football league system. Founded in 1886, the SJFA is responsible for disciplinary matters within the grade, certain player registration procedures and organising the annual Scottish Junior Cup. Other league and cup competitions are organised by three regional committees. The association headquarters are at Hampden Park, Glasgow, which is Scotland's national football stadium. There was an earlier Scottish Junior FA, which was founded in Glasgow in October 1880. This body also ran a Scottish Junior Cup competition during 1880–81 season but appears to have disbanded at the end of that season.

Queens Park F.C. association football club

Queen's Park Football Club is a Scottish football club based in Glasgow. The club is currently the only fully amateur club in the Scottish Professional Football League; its amateur status is reflected by its Latin motto, 'Ludere Causa Ludendi' – 'To Play for the Sake of Playing'.

The Scottish football league system is a series of generally unconnected leagues for Scottish football clubs. The Scottish system is more complicated than many other national league systems, consisting of several completely separate systems or 'grades' of leagues and clubs, with Senior football, Junior football, and beneath these Amateur and Welfare football.

Scottish Cup

The Scottish Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the Scottish Cup, is an annual association football knock-out cup competition for men's football clubs in Scotland. The competition was first held in 1873–74. Entry is open to all 90 clubs with full membership of the Scottish Football Association (SFA), along with up to eight other clubs who are associate members. The competition is called the William Hill Scottish Cup for sponsorship reasons.

Thomas Stewart is a Scottish former amateur footballer who played as a right half in the Scottish League for Queen's Park and in English non-league football for Bishop Auckland and Romford. He captained Scotland at amateur level and represented Great Britain at the 1952 Summer Olympics.

Robert Lindsay Cromar was a Scottish amateur football right half and right back who made over 360 appearances in the Scottish League for Queen's Park. He captained the club and later served as president. Cromar represented Scotland at amateur level and captained the team on occasion.

Peter Gordon Blyth Buchanan is a retired Scottish amateur football centre forward who made over 200 appearances in the Scottish League for Queen's Park. He later served on the club's committee and as president. He is Scotland's joint-top scorer at amateur level and made two 1964 Summer Olympic qualifying appearances for Great Britain.

John Samuel Cole is a retired Scottish amateur football wing half who made over 100 appearances in the Scottish League for Queen's Park. He later played in Australia for Pan Hellenic and was capped by Scotland at amateur level.

Andrew P. McEwan was a Scottish amateur football forward who played in the Scottish League for Queen's Park, Queen of the South and Rangers. He was capped by Scotland at amateur level.

Jean Louis Pollatschek is a former Scottish football left back and manager who played in the Scottish League for Queen's Park and Hamilton Academical. He was capped by Scotland at amateur level and after his retirement, he became a manager and coach. Pollatschek managed the Glasgow University team, which reached the second round of the 1975–76 Scottish Cup and later served as manager of Scotland Women. He also coached at Clydebank and former club Hamilton Academical.

David Morton Ramsay is a retired Scottish football goalkeeper who played in the Scottish League for Queen's Park. He was capped by Scotland at amateur level.

Henry Gordon Wilson is a retired Scottish amateur football goalkeeper who played in the Scottish League for Queen's Park. He was capped by Scotland at amateur level. Wilson also played rugby union.

Alexander Cross was a Scottish amateur football left half who played in the Scottish League for Queen's Park. He was capped by Scotland at amateur level.

Anthony Colin McAllister Johnston was a Scottish amateur football centre half who played in the Scottish League for Queen's Park. He was capped by Scotland at amateur level.

Laurence Durkie McBain was a Scottish football forward who made over 100 appearances in the Scottish League for St Johnstone. He also played for Queen's Park, Dundee United and Raith Rovers and was capped by Scotland at amateur level.

Andrew McCartney was a Scottish amateur football centre half who played in the Scottish League for Queen's Park, Cowdenbeath and Partick Thistle. He was capped by Scotland at amateur level.

Thomas Young was a Scottish amateur football outside left who played in the Scottish League for Queen's Park and Queen of the South. He was capped by Scotland at amateur level.

References