Scotland at the UEFA European Championship

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The UEFA European Football Championship is the main football competition of the men's national football teams governed by UEFA (the Union of European Football Associations). Held every four years since 1960, in the even-numbered year between World Cup tournaments, it was originally called the UEFA European Nations Cup, changing to the current name in 1968. Starting with the 1996 tournament, specific championships are often referred to in the form "Euro 2008" or whichever year is appropriate. Prior to entering the tournament all teams other than the host nations (which qualify automatically) compete in a qualifying process.

Association football team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

1960 European Nations Cup 1960 edition of the UEFA European Nations Cup

The 1960 UEFA European Nations' Cup was the first European Football Championship, held every four years and endorsed by UEFA. The first tournament was held in France. It was won by the Soviet Union, who beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in Paris after extra time.

Contents

Scotland have participated in two UEFA European Football Championships finals, those held in 1992 and 1996. They have played six matches: winning two, drawing one and losing three. They have scored four goals and conceded five.

Scotland national football team mens association football team representing Scotland

The Scotland national football team represents Scotland in international football and is controlled by the Scottish Football Association. It competes in the three major professional tournaments, the FIFA World Cup, UEFA Nations League and the UEFA European Championship. Scotland, as a constituent country of the United Kingdom, is not a member of the International Olympic Committee and therefore the national team does not compete in the Olympic Games. The majority of Scotland's home matches are played at the national stadium, Hampden Park.

UEFA Euro 1992 1992 edition of the UEFA Euro

The 1992 UEFA European Football Championship was hosted by Sweden between 10 and 26 June 1992. It was the ninth European Football Championship, which is held every four years and supported by UEFA.

UEFA Euro 1996 1996 edition of the UEFA Euro

The 1996 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly referred to as Euro 96, was the 10th UEFA European Championship, a quadrennial football tournament contested by European nations and organised by UEFA. It took place in England from 8 to 30 June 1996.

History

1960s

Scotland first participated in the European Championships in 1968, after not entering the first two tournaments. The 1966–67 and 1967–68 editions of the British Home Championship formed the results of their qualifying group, with Scotland finishing a point behind group winners England. Scotland's first qualifying match was a 1–1 draw in Cardiff against Wales on 22 October 1966, with Denis Law scoring an 86th minute equaliser for the Scots. Scotland's first win came against Northern Ireland on 16 November 1966 at Hampden Park - they won 2–1. On 15 April 1967, Scotland became the first side to defeat England since their World Cup victory - a 3–2 win at Wembley gave Scotland the 1966–67 British Home Championship crown. Northern Ireland defeated Scotland 1–0 in Belfast on 21 October 1967, before a 3–2 victory against the Welsh on 22 November 1967. A 1–1 draw with England, on 24 February 1968, wasn't enough for Scotland to qualify from the group.

The 1966–67 British Home Championship has remained famous in the memories of British Home Nations football fans ever since the dramatic climatic match at Wembley Stadium, where an unfancied Scottish team beat England on the same turf they had won the 1966 FIFA World Cup a year before. England had comfortably disposed of Wales and Ireland in the earlier matches, whilst Scotland had struggled, drawing with Wales and only just beating the Irish. In the final match however, the Scots outplayed their illustrious opponents who were effectively reduced to 10 men with Jack Charlton hobbling and no substitutes allowed claiming a 3–2 victory, thus resulting in some over-enthusiastic Scottish supporters claiming to be "world champions with many of them invading the pitch, digging up much of the turf and stealing the goal woodwork after the game. In contrast to later pitch invasions, this was non-violent and resulted in no significant police action. The "World Champions" idea has since taken more tangible form in the Unofficial Football World Championships.

The 1967–68 British Home Championship football was the final stage of the 1968 UEFA European Football Championship qualifying for the Home Nations, and provided revenge for an England team smarting from a defeat on their home ground to the Scots just months after winning the 1966 FIFA World Cup which cost them the 1966–67 British Home Championship. The English victories against Wales and Ireland in the first two games meant that going into the final match they only required a draw, which they eventually achieved in a hard fought match, winning the tournament and the place in the European Championship. The Scots started badly against the unfancied Irish, losing in Belfast, and never recovered, scraping a win against Wales and needing a win against a dominant England team. The Irish were unable to capitalise on an excellent start, losing to England and Wales and coming fourth, whilst the Welsh managed a win against Ireland in their final game to scrape into joint third place after a terrible start.

The British Home Championship was an annual football competition contested between the United Kingdom's four national teams: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Starting during the 1883–84 season, it is the oldest international football tournament and it was contested until the 1983–84 season, when it was abolished after 100 years.

1970s

Scotland were drawn alongside Belgium, Denmark and Portugal in the qualification phase of UEFA Euro 1972. Scotland won all their home matches, but lost all their away games to finish third in the group. A 1–0 defeat to Denmark in Copenhagen on 9 June 1971 saw Scotland eliminated from qualifying. Belgium won the group to progress to the play-offs.

Belgium national football team mens national association football team representing Belgium

The Belgian national football team has officially represented Belgium in association football since their maiden match in 1904. The squad is under the global jurisdiction of FIFA and is governed in Europe by UEFA—both of which were co-founded by the Belgian team's supervising body, the Royal Belgian Football Association (RBFA). Periods of regular Belgian representation at the highest international level, from 1920 to 1938, from 1982 to 2002 and again from 2014 onwards, have alternated with mostly unsuccessful qualification rounds. Most of Belgium's home matches are played at the King Baudouin Stadium in Brussels.

Denmark national football team mens national association football team representing Denmark

The Denmark national football team represents Denmark in association football and is controlled by the Danish Football Association (DBU), the governing body for the football clubs which are organized under DBU. Denmark's home ground is Parken Stadium in the Østerbro district of Copenhagen, and their head coach is Åge Hareide.

Portugal national football team mens national association football team representing Portugal

The Portugal national football team represents Portugal in international men's association football competition since 1921. It is controlled by the Portuguese Football Federation, the governing body for football in Portugal.

UEFA Euro 1976 qualifying saw Scotland face Denmark, Romania and Spain. Scotland lost their opening match 2–1 to the Spaniards at Hampden, before drawing 1–1 in Valencia. Gordon McQueen scored a late equaliser to win Scotland a point away in Romania, before Joe Harper's goal saw Scotland beat Denmark 1–0 away from home. Scotland won the reverse fixture 3–1. Scotland's final match was at home to Romania, with Scotland requiring a two goal win to win the group and qualify for the play-offs. Scotland took the lead through a Bruce Rioch goal, but Romania levelled the match with fifteen minutes to go to send Scotland out.

The qualifying round for the 1976 European Football Championship consisted of 32 teams divided into eight groups of four teams. Each group winner progressed to the quarter-finals. The quarter-finals were played in two legs on a home-and-away basis. The winners of the quarter-finals would go through, to the final tournament.

Romania national football team national association football team

The Romania national football team represents Romania in international football and is controlled by the Romanian Football Federation. They are colloquially known as Tricolorii.

Spain national football team National association football team representing Spain

The Spain national football team represents Spain in international men's association football since 1920, and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

1980s

Scotland's qualifying group for Euro 1980 featured Austria, Belgium, Norway and Portugal. Defeats against Austria and Portugal in their opening three matches removed any chance of qualification for Scotland, with two wins over Norway and a 4–1 victory over Portugal at Hampden being the only victories in a disappointing qualifying campaign for the Scots, who finished fourth.

Austria national football team mens national association football team representing Austria

The Austria national football team is the association football team that represents Austria in international competition and is controlled by the Austrian Football Association . Austria has qualified for seven FIFA World Cups, most recently in 1998. The country played in the UEFA European Championship for the first time in 2008, when it co-hosted the event with Switzerland, and most recently qualified in 2016.

Norway national football team national association football team

The Norway men's national football team represents Norway in international association football and is controlled by the Football Association of Norway, the governing body for football in Norway. Norway's home ground is Ullevaal Stadion in Oslo and their head coach is Lars Lagerbäck. It is, as of November 2018, ranked by FIFA as the 46th best football team in the world.

Belgium, East Germany and Switzerland were Scotland's opponents in qualifying for UEFA Euro 1984. An opening game win over East Germany was the only victory of the campaign for the Scots, with home draws against Belgium and Switzerland being the only other points obtained in the campaign. Scotland lost all of their away matches to finish bottom of the group.

Scotland faced Belgium, Bulgaria, Luxembourg and the Republic of Ireland in qualifying for UEFA Euro 1988. Two 0–0 draws against Bulgaria and the Republic of Ireland was followed up with a 3–0 victory over minnows Luxembourg. Successive defeats against the Republic of Ireland (1–0) and Belgium (4–1) saw qualification fall out of reach, once again. Victories over Belgium (2–0) and Bulgaria (1–0) followed, before a disappointing 0–0 draw over Luxembourg, who obtained their first and only point of the campaign. Victory by four goals would have seen Scotland qualify, instead the Scots finished two points behind group winners Republic of Ireland in fourth.

1990s

Scotland played out a goalless draw against the Netherlands during Euro 1996 at Villa Park, Birmingham Scotland-holland euro 96.jpg
Scotland played out a goalless draw against the Netherlands during Euro 1996 at Villa Park, Birmingham

Under the guidance of manager Andy Roxburgh, Scotland qualified for the UEFA European Championship for the first time in 1992. [1] Scotland were drawn into a qualifying group of Bulgaria, Romania, San Marino and Switzerland. A 1–0 defeat to Romania away from home left qualification dependent upon other results, but a 1–1 draw between Bulgaria and Romania in the final group match saw Scotland squeeze through as group winners by a single point. [2] Scotland were drawn into a very difficult group, facing the Netherlands, the defending champions, the CIS, the remains of the Soviet Union team who were defeated in the final in 1988, and Germany, who were defeated in the semi-finals in 1988. Despite competing well in defeats against the Netherlands and Germany and a fine 3–0 win against the CIS, the team was knocked out at the group stage. [2]

After Scotland failed to qualify for the 1994 FIFA World Cup, Andy Roxburgh was replaced by Craig Brown as Scotland manager. [3] Brown successfully guided Scotland to the 1996 European Championship tournament, in second place behind Russia, in a qualifying group also featuring Greece, Faroe Islands, Finland and San Marino. [3] The first game at the tournament against the Netherlands ended 0–0, raising morale ahead of a much anticipated game against rivals England at Wembley Stadium. [3] Gary McAllister missed a penalty kick and a goal by Paul Gascoigne led to a 2–0 defeat. Scotland recovered to beat Switzerland 1–0 with a goal by Ally McCoist. England taking a 4–0 lead in the other match briefly put both teams in a position to qualify, but a late goal for the Netherlands meant that Scotland were eliminated on goals scored. [3] The Netherlands and Scotland both had four points and a goal difference of minus one. [4]

2000s

Scotland finished second in their qualifying group for UEFA Euro 2000. The Czech Republic won the group, after winning all their matches. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Estonia and Lithuania all finished seven points behind Scotland, with the Faroe Islands bringing up the rear. Scotland were the third best second placed team, which qualified them for the play-offs. They were drawn against England. On 13 November 1999, England won the first leg 2–0 at Hampden Park, with Paul Scholes scoring both goals. [5] Four days later, Scotland won the return leg at Wembley. [6] Don Hutchison scored the winner for Scotland in a 1–0 win, which wasn't enough to prevent England qualifying for Euro 2000.

Scotland, once again, finished second in their qualifying group in qualification for Euro 2004. This time Germany were the group winners, with Iceland, Lithuania and the Faroe Islands finishing behind Scotland. On 7 June 2003, Scotland drew 1–1 with the Germans at Hampden with Kenny Miller scoring the equaliser. [7] The second place finish saw Scotland progress to the play-offs, where they were drawn against the Netherlands. On 15 November 2003, Scotland won the first leg 1–0, via a James McFadden goal. [8] However, the Dutch won 6–0, four days later, in Amsterdam to knock Scotland out of the competition. [9]

Scotland faced Italy and France, who had contested the 2006 World Cup final, in their qualifying group for UEFA Euro 2008. A 6–0 victory over the Faroe Islands started the campaign strongly, [10] before defeating Lithuania 2–1 in Kaunas. [11] On 7 October 2006, Scotland moved to the top of their group with a surprise 1–0 victory over France at Hampden Park. [12] Scotland were defeated 2–0 in Ukraine four days later to end Scotland's winning start to the campaign. [13] On 24 March 2007, Scotland won 2–1 against Georgia with a late goal from Craig Beattie, [14] before falling 2–0 to World Champions Italy in Bari. [15] . Despite the defeat Scotland were level on points at the top of the qualifying group with France and Ukraine; Italy were two points behind. [15] Victories over the Faroe Islands and Lithuania followed, [16] [17] before another 1–0 victory against the French, this time in Paris. James McFadden scored the winning goal. [18] A 3–1 victory over Ukraine on 13 October 2007 saw Scotland strengthen their position at the top of the group, [19] but a 2–0 defeat to a youthful Georgia side saw the campaign turn. [20] Scotland required a win over Italy in their final game to qualify for Euro 2008, but fell to a 2–1 defeat after a late Italian goal put the Scots out. [21] Scotland finished their group in third place.

2010s

Scotland finished third in their UEFA Euro 2012 qualifying group, behind World and European Champions Spain and the Czech Republic. On 3 September 2011, a stoppage time Czech penalty saw them steal a point from Hampden Park, which ultimately proved vital for Scotland's qualification chances. [22] Scotland would have finished second in the group and reached the play-offs, with victory in that match.

UEFA Euro 2016 saw eight additional teams qualify for the finals than was previously the case. This meant that the top two from each qualifying group would qualify, with the third placed team entering the play-offs. Scotland's 1–0 defeat against Georgia was the pivotal game of the group. [23] A stoppage time equaliser from Poland on 8 October saw Scotland eliminated. [24] Scotland finished fourth, behind Germany, Poland and the Republic of Ireland.

2020s

Scotland is due to host three group games and a last 16 match during UEFA Euro 2020, which is being held at venues across Europe. [25]

Statistics

Tournament summary

YearFinal TournamentQualification
RoundPldWDLFARoundPldWDLFA
1960 Did not enter
1964
1968 Did not qualify Group – 2nd 6321108
1972 Group – 3rd 630347
1976 Group – 3rd 623186
1980 Group – 4th 83141513
1984 Group – 4th 6123810
1988 Group – 4th 833275
1992 Round 1310233 Group – 1st 8431147
1996 Round 1311112 Group – 2nd 10721193
2000 Did not qualify Play-offs 126341612
2004 Play-offs 105231314
2008 Group – 3rd 128042112
2012 Group – 3rd 8323910
2016 Group – 4th 104332212
2020 TBD
Totals2/15621345110522633166119

Matches played

Year
(manager)
RoundOpponentScoreResultVenueScotland scorers
1992
(Roxburgh)
Group stageFlag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 0–1 L Gothenburg &
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0–2 L Norrköping &
Flag of the CIS.svg  CIS 3–0 W Norrköping Paul McStay, Brian McClair, Gary McAllister
1996
(Brown)
Group stageFlag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 0–0 D Birmingham &
Flag of England.svg  England 0–2 L London &
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1–0 W Birmingham Ally McCoist

Head to head records

Final tournament head-to-head
OpponentPWDLGFGA%W%D%L
CIS-euro92-flag.png  CIS 11003010000
Flag of England.svg  England 10010200100
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 10010200100
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 20110105050
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 11001010000

Qualifying

Qualifying head-to-head
OpponentPWDLGFGA%W%D%L
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 20113405050
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 82158162512.562.5
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 22003110000
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 40312307525
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 40135802575
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 43015275025
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 21013250050
Flag of England.svg  England 421155502525
Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 21103250500
Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands 862023675250
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 22003010000
Flag of France.svg  France 22002010000
Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia 42023450050
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 40135802575
Flag of Gibraltar.svg  Gibraltar 220012110000
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 21011150050
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 22004110000
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 20021400100
Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein 22003110000
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 852110362.52512.5
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 21103050500
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 21011650050
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 21013150050
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 22007310000
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 20204401000
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 42026550050
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 412122255025
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 412144255025
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 20201101000
Flag of San Marino.svg  San Marino 440013010000
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 40135902575
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 412167255025
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 21013350050
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 21104350500

Appearances

No.NameMatchesEuros
1 Andy Goram 61992 and 1996
Gary McAllister 61992 and 1996
Stuart McCall 61992 and 1996
4 Gordon Durie 51992 and 1996
Stewart McKimmie 51992 and 1996
Ally McCoist 51992 and 1996
7 Tom Boyd 41992 and 1996
Kevin Gallacher 41992 and 1996
9 Craig Burley 31996
Colin Calderwood 31996
John Collins 31996
Richard Gough 31992
Colin Hendry 31996
Brian McClair 31992
Dave McPherson 31992
Paul McStay 31992
John Spencer 31996

Goalscorers

1 goal

Squads

See also

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