Singapore Open (golf)

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Singapore Open
Singapore Open logo.png
Tournament information
Location Singapore
Established1961
Course(s)Sentosa Golf Club
(Serapong course)
Par71
Length7,372 yards (6,741 m)
Tour(s) Asian Tour
Japan Golf Tour
European Tour
PGA Tour of Australasia
Asia Golf Circuit
Format Stroke play
Prize fund US$1,000,000
Month playedJanuary
Tournament record score
Aggregate266 Jazz Janewattananond (2019)
266 Matt Kuchar (2020)
To par−18 as above
Current champion
Flag of the United States.svg Matt Kuchar
Location Map
Singapore location map (main island).svg
Icona golf.svg
Sentosa GC
Location in Singapore

The Singapore Open is a golf tournament in Singapore that is part of the Asian Tour schedule. The event has been held at Sentosa Golf Club since 2005 and since 2017 has been part of the Open Qualifying Series, giving up to four non-exempt players entry into The Open Championship.

Contents

The Singapore Open was founded in 1961 and was one of the tournaments on the first season of the Far East Circuit (later the Asia Golf Circuit) the following year. [1] It remained part of the Asia circuit until 1993 when it became a fixture on the Australasian Tour. [2] After just 3 seasons, it left the Australasian Tour to join the fledgling Asian Tour for that tour's second season in 1996. [3] The event was also co-sanctioned with the European Tour from 2009 to 2012, and with the Japan Golf Tour since 2016.

History

The Singapore Open was founded in 1961 [4] and was staged annually until 2001, when it was won by Thaworn Wiratchant. Other winners in the years leading up to this included American Shaun Micheel in 1998, who went on to win the 2003 PGA Championship.

In 2002 the event was cancelled because of lack of sponsorship. It was not revived until 2005, when sponsorship was secured from the Sentosa Leisure Group. The 2005 prize fund was $2 million, which made the Singapore Open by far the richest tournament exclusive to the Asian Tour that was not co-sanctioned by the European Tour, a status it retained until the European Tour first co-sanctioned the event in 2009. Asian Tour chief executive Louis Martin claimed when the revival of the tournament was announced, "Competing for a prize purse of two million US dollars will give our playing membership a huge boost and elevate the Asian Tour to a new level." The 2005 event was played in September.

The 2006 Singapore Open offered a purse of US$3 million with a winner's share of US$475,000. In May 2006 it was announced that Barclays Bank would sponsor the event for five years from 2006 and that the prize fund will be increased to US$4 million in 2007 and US$5 million in 2008. [5] In 2011, the purse was US$6,000,000. The 2013 edition was cancelled due to lack of sponsorship. [6]

After a three-year absence, the tournament returned in January 2016. The event is co-sanctioned by the Asian Tour and Japan Golf Tour. [7] It features Sumitomo Mitsui Bank as title sponsor and has a US$1 million purse.

Winners

YearTour(s) [lower-alpha 1] WinnerScoreTo parMargin of
victory
Runner(s)-upVenueRef.
SMBC Singapore Open
2021No tournament due to the COVID-19 pandemic [8]
2020 ASA, JPN Flag of the United States.svg Matt Kuchar 266−183 strokes Flag of England.svg Justin Rose Sentosa
2019 ASA, JPN Flag of Thailand.svg Jazz Janewattananond 266−182 strokes Flag of England.svg Paul Casey
Flag of Japan.svg Yoshinori Fujimoto
Sentosa
2018 ASA, JPN Flag of Spain.svg Sergio García 270−145 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Satoshi Kodaira
Flag of South Africa.svg Shaun Norris
Sentosa
2017 ASA, JPN Flag of Thailand.svg Prayad Marksaeng 275−91 stroke Flag of Thailand.svg Phachara Khongwatmai
Flag of South Africa.svg Jbe' Kruger
Flag of the Philippines.svg Juvic Pagunsan
Flag of South Korea.svg Song Young-han
Sentosa
2016 ASA, JPN Flag of South Korea.svg Song Young-han 272−121 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Jordan Spieth Sentosa
Singapore Open
2013–2015: No tournament
Barclays Singapore Open
2012 ASA, EUR Flag of Italy.svg Matteo Manassero 271−13Playoff Flag of South Africa.svg Louis Oosthuizen Sentosa
2011 ASA, EUR Flag of Spain.svg Gonzalo Fernández-Castaño 199 [lower-alpha 2] −14Playoff Flag of the Philippines.svg Juvic Pagunsan Sentosa
2010 ASA, EUR Flag of Australia (converted).svg Adam Scott (3)267−173 strokes Flag of Denmark.svg Anders Hansen Sentosa
2009 ASA, EUR Flag of England.svg Ian Poulter 274−101 stroke Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Liang Wenchong Sentosa
2008 ASA Flag of India.svg Jeev Milkha Singh 277−71 stroke Flag of Ireland.svg Pádraig Harrington
Flag of South Africa.svg Ernie Els
Sentosa
2007 ASA Flag of Argentina.svg Ángel Cabrera 276−81 stroke Flag of Fiji.svg Vijay Singh Sentosa
2006 ASA Flag of Australia (converted).svg Adam Scott (2)205 [lower-alpha 3] −8Playoff [lower-alpha 4] Flag of South Africa.svg Ernie Els Sentosa
2005 ASA Flag of Australia (converted).svg Adam Scott 271−137 strokes Flag of England.svg Lee Westwood Sentosa
Singapore Open
2002–2004: No tournament
Alcatel Singapore Open
2001 ASA Flag of Thailand.svg Thaworn Wiratchant 272−161 stroke Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsieh Yu-shu Jurong [9]
Singapore Open
2000 ASA Flag of India.svg Jyoti Randhawa 268−203 strokes Flag of South Africa.svg Hendrik Buhrmann Singapore Island
(Island course)
Nokia Singapore Open
1999 ASA Flag of Australia (converted).svg Kenny Druce 276−12Playoff Flag of South Africa.svg Desvonde Botes Orchid
Ericsson Singapore Open
1998 ASA Flag of the United States.svg Shaun Micheel 272−162 strokes Flag of South Africa.svg Hendrik Buhrmann Safra
SingTel Ericsson Singapore Open
1997 ASA Flag of Myanmar (1974-2010).svg Zaw Moe 277−113 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Fran Quinn Jurong
Canon Singapore Open
1996 ASA Flag of the United States.svg John Kernohan 285−31 stroke Flag of Australia (converted).svg Darren Cole
Flag of South Africa.svg Craig Kamps
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Brad King
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Peter Lonard
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Robert Willis
Laguna National
Epson Singapore Open
1995ANZ Flag of Australia (converted).svg Steven Conran 270−143 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Andrew Bonhomme Singapore Island [10]
1994ANZ Flag of Myanmar (1974-2010).svg Kyi Hla Han 275−131 stroke Flag of Australia (converted).svg Wayne Grady Tanah Merah [11]
1993ANZ Flag of Australia (converted).svg Paul Moloney 276−121 stroke Flag of Australia (converted).svg Richard Green Tanah Merah [12]
1992AGC Flag of the United States.svg Bill Israelson 2676 strokes Flag of the Philippines.svg Frankie Miñoza Singapore Island [13]
1991AGC Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Jack Kay Jr. 2802 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Wayne Riley Tanah Merah [14]
1990AGC Flag of the Philippines.svg Antolin Fernando 273Playoff Flag of the Philippines.svg Frankie Miñoza Singapore Island
Singapore Open
1989AGC Flag of the Republic of China.svg Lu Chien-soon (2)2821 stroke Flag of Mexico.svg Carlos Espinosa Tanah Merah [15]
1988AGC Flag of the United States.svg Greg Bruckner 2811 stroke Flag of the Republic of China.svg Chung Chun-hsing Tanah Merah [16]
1987AGC Flag of Australia (converted).svg Peter Fowler 274Playoff Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsu Sheng-san
Flag of the United States.svg Jeff Maggert
Singapore Island [17]
1986AGC Flag of New Zealand.svg Greg Turner 2714 strokes Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Tony Grimes
Flag of the United States.svg Duffy Waldorf
Singapore Island [18]
1985AGC Flag of the Republic of China.svg Chen Tze-ming 274Playoff Flag of New Zealand.svg Greg Turner Singapore Island [19]
1984AGC Flag of the United States.svg Tom Sieckmann 2742 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Terry Gale
Flag of Myanmar (1974-2010).svg Kyi Hla Han
Flag of the United States.svg Bill Israelson
Singapore Island [20]
1983AGC Flag of the Republic of China.svg Lu Chien-soon 279Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Bill Brask Singapore Island [21]
1982AGC Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsu Sheng-san 2745 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Terry Gale Singapore Island [22]
1981AGC Flag of Myanmar (1974-2010).svg Mya Aye 2732 strokes Flag of the Republic of China.svg Lu Hsi-chuen Singapore Island [23]
1980AGC Flag of the United States.svg Kurt Cox 2761 stroke Flag of Myanmar (1974-2010).svg Mya Aye
Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsu Sheng-san
Singapore Island [24] [25]
1979AGC Flag of the Republic of China.svg Lu Hsi-chuen 280Playoff Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsu Sheng-san Singapore Island [26]
1978AGC Flag of Australia (converted).svg Terry Gale 2781 stroke Flag of Myanmar (1974-2010).svg Mya Aye Singapore Island [27]
1977AGC Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsu Chi-san 2771 stroke Flag of the Philippines.svg Ben Arda
Flag of Myanmar (1974-2010).svg Mya Aye
Singapore Island [28]
1976AGC Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Kesahiko Uchida 2732 strokes Flag of the Philippines.svg Ben Arda Singapore Island [29]
1975AGC Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Yutaka Suzuki 2841 stroke Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsieh Min-Nan
Flag of the Republic of China.svg Kuo Chie-Hsiung
Singapore Island
(New course)
[30]
1974AGC Flag of the Philippines.svg Eleuterio Nival 2754 strokes Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsieh Yung-yo Singapore Island [31]
1973AGC Flag of the Philippines.svg Ben Arda (2)284Playoff Flag of Scotland.svg Norman Wood Singapore Island [32]
1972AGC Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Takaaki Kono 2794 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Takashi Murakami Singapore Island
(New course)
[33]
1971AGC Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Haruo Yasuda 2772 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Takaaki Kono
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Peter Thomson
Singapore Island [34]
1970AGC Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsieh Yung-yo (2)2762 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg David Graham
Flag of Japan.svg Haruo Yasuda
Singapore Island [35]
1969AGC Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tomio Kamata 278Playoff Flag of Australia (converted).svg David Graham
Flag of England.svg Guy Wolstenholme
Singapore Island [36]
1968AGC Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsieh Yung-yo 2756 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Han Chang-sang
Flag of Japan.svg Kenji Hosoishi
Singapore Island [37]
1967AGC Flag of the Philippines.svg Ben Arda 282Playoff Flag of Japan.svg Hideyo Sugimoto Singapore Island [38]
1966AGC Flag of New Zealand.svg Ross Newdick 284Playoff Flag of the Republic of China.svg Lu Liang-Huan
Flag of Scotland.svg George Will
Singapore Island [39]
1965AGC Flag of Australia (converted).svg Frank Phillips (2)2792 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Tadashi Kitta Singapore Island [40]
1964AGC Flag of Australia (converted).svg Ted Ball 2911 stroke Flag of Australia (converted).svg Eric Cremin
Flag of Japan.svg Tadashi Kitta
Singapore Island [41]
1963AGC Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Alan Brookes 2767 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Tomoo Ishii Royal Island [42]
1962AGC Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Brian Wilkes 2832 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Haruyoshi Kobari Royal Singapore [43]
1961AGC Flag of Australia (converted).svg Frank Phillips 2758 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Darrell Welch Royal Island [44]
  1. ASA – Asian Tour (formerly Asian PGA/Omega/Davidoff Tour); AGC – Asia Golf Circuit; ANZ – PGA Tour of Australasia; EUR – European Tour; JPN – Japan Golf Tour
  2. 2011 tournament shortened to 54 holes due to weather.
  3. 2006 tournament was shortened to 54 holes.
  4. Scott beat Els in a 3 hole playoff.

See also

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References

  1. Steel, Donald (1987). Golf Records, Facts and Champions. Guinness. pp. 153–155. ISBN   0851128475.
  2. 2016 Media Guide. PGA Tour of Australasia. p. 166.
  3. "Asian tour snares Singapore Open". The Canberra Times . Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 15 November 1995. p. 22. Retrieved 14 February 2020 via Trove.
  4. "Here's how all began..." Singapore Monitor. 21 March 1984. p. 35.
  5. "Barclays Take up Title Sponsorship of the Singapore Open". Asian Tour. 23 May 2006. Archived from the original on 2 June 2006.
  6. Nair, Sanjay (19 July 2013). "Golf: No Singapore Open in 2013, but tournament will be held early next year". The Straits Times.
  7. "Singapore Open to return in 2016". Asian Tour. 28 January 2015. Archived from the original on 31 January 2015.
  8. Kwek, Kimberly (21 January 2021). "SMBC Singapore Open postponed to 2022". The Straits Times. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  9. "Thaworn becomes first Thai to win S'pore Open". Today. 25 June 2001. p. 32. Retrieved 24 June 2020 via National Library Board.
  10. "Neumann storms home to clinch Open at the third play-off hole". The Canberra Times . 71 (22, 124). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 13 November 1995. p. 22. Retrieved 30 April 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  11. "McCumber turns tip into riches". The Canberra Times . 70 (21, 747). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 1 November 1994. p. 22. Retrieved 30 April 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  12. "Norman fires 62: 'not a great round'". The Canberra Times . 67 (21, 146). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 8 March 1993. p. 28. Retrieved 30 April 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  13. "Israelson bags the Singapore Open with ease". New Straits Times. 2 March 1992.
  14. "Consistent Kay Hits the Jackpot". New Straits Times. 25 February 1991. p. F27. Retrieved 15 December 2020 via Google News Archive.
  15. "Lu fights back to win title". Business Times. 20 March 1989. p. 14.
  16. "Who says nice guys finish last?". Business Times. 14 March 1988. p. 13.
  17. "Aussie golfer wins Open in three-way play-off". The Straits Times. 30 March 1987. p. 1.
  18. "Turner wins by four strokes". Business Times. 7 March 1986. p. 9.
  19. "Tze-Ming wins Open in style". Singapore Monitor. 1 April 1985. p. 23.
  20. "Sieckmann swings it". The Straits Times. 26 March 1984. p. 25.
  21. "Lu sinks Brask in sudden death". Singapore Monitor. 14 March 1983. p. 26.
  22. "It's a Hat-trick". The Straits Times. 29 March 1982. p. 35.
  23. "Mya charges in to victory". The Straits Times. 30 March 1981. p. 30.
  24. "Cox wins Singapore Open". The Straits Times. 31 March 1980. p. 31.
  25. "Immaculate golf". The Canberra Times. 1 April 1980. p. 37. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  26. "Master Lu's title after sudden-death with Hsu". The Straits Times. 5 March 1979. p. 30.
  27. "Gale storms ahead at 8th". New Nation. 27 March 1978. p. 20.
  28. "Hsu wins with his cool golf..." The Straits Times. 28 March 1977. p. 27.
  29. "Uchida holds late Arda challenge to win S'pore Open". The Straits Times. 15 March 1976. p. 26.
  30. "Newcomer Suzuki is shock Singapore Open golf winner". The Straits Times. 24 March 1975. p. 26.
  31. "Stocky Nival bags Singapore Open with a sizzling 67". The Straits Times. 4 March 1974. p. 24.
  32. "Evergreen Arda wins Open by 'sudden death'". The Straits Times. 12 March 1973. p. 29.
  33. "It's Kono's title as Jumbo crashes". The Straits Times. 6 March 1972. p. 31.
  34. "No-risk Yasuda is Open golf champion". The Straits Times. 8 March 1971. p. 27.
  35. "Yung Yo's S'pore Open by 2 strokes". The Straits Times. 2 March 1970. p. 24.
  36. "Kamata triumphs". The Straits Times. 10 March 1969. p. 20.
  37. "Yung-Yo fires eagle to signal victory". The Straits Times. 4 March 1968. p. 20.
  38. "Arda wins Singapore Open". The Straits Times. 6 March 1967. p. 20.
  39. "It's Newdick's Open". The Straits Times. 7 March 1966. p. 21.
  40. "Phillips wears down Kitta with superb 66". The Straits Times. 8 March 1965. p. 17.
  41. "S'pore Open to Ted Ball". The Straits Times. 9 March 1964. p. 18.
  42. "It's Brookes title with scorching round of 64". The Straits Times. 25 February 1963. p. 20.
  43. "Wilkes grabs $5,000 first prize". The Straits Times. 19 February 1962. p. 17.
  44. "Easy victory for Phillips". The Straits Times. 6 February 1961. p. 15.

Coordinates: 1°18′N103°48′E / 1.3°N 103.8°E / 1.3; 103.8