Sisters, Oregon

Last updated
Sisters, Oregon
Sisters main street.jpg
Cascade Avenue in downtown Sisters
Motto(s): 
"A Modern Western Community"
Deschutes County Oregon Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Sisters Highlighted.svg
Location in Oregon
Coordinates: 44°17′27″N121°32′56″W / 44.29083°N 121.54889°W / 44.29083; -121.54889 Coordinates: 44°17′27″N121°32′56″W / 44.29083°N 121.54889°W / 44.29083; -121.54889
Country United States
State Oregon
County Deschutes
Incorporated 1946
Government
   Mayor Chuck Ryan
Area
[1]
  Total1.88 sq mi (4.86 km2)
  Land1.88 sq mi (4.86 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
3,182 ft (970 m)
Population
 (2010) [2]
  Total2,038
  Estimate 
(2019) [3]
2,781
  Density1,481.62/sq mi (572.07/km2)
Time zone UTC-8 (Pacific)
  Summer (DST) UTC-7 (Pacific)
ZIP code
97759
Area code(s) 541
FIPS code 41-67950 [2]
GNIS feature ID1127008 [4]
Website www.ci.sisters.or.us

Sisters is a city in Deschutes County, Oregon, United States. It is part of the Bend, Oregon Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 2,038 at the 2010 census. [5]

Contents

History

The community takes its name from the nearby Three Sisters mountains. [6]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.87 square miles (4.84 km2), all of it land. [7]

The Santiam Highway (U.S. Route 20) and the McKenzie Highway (Oregon Route 126) merge briefly to form Cascade Avenue, the main thoroughfare through downtown Sisters. On Cascade Avenue, there is a lot of pedestrian traffic and many specialty stores and galleries. East of Sisters the two highways split, with 126 heading to Redmond and 20 going to Bend. [8] West of Sisters, the road splits once more, with the McKenzie Highway becoming Oregon Route 242 [8] and running west over the McKenzie Pass (a summertime-only scenic route over the Cascades.) The Santiam Highway proceeds over the Santiam Pass.

Climate

This region experiences warm (but not hot) and dry summers, with no average monthly temperatures above 71.6 °F (22.0 °C). According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Sisters has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csb" on climate maps. [9]

Climate data for Sisters
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)65
(18)
72
(22)
78
(26)
87
(31)
98
(37)
103
(39)
109
(43)
106
(41)
103
(39)
92
(33)
73
(23)
64
(18)
109
(43)
Average high °F (°C)41.1
(5.1)
45.1
(7.3)
51.1
(10.6)
57
(14)
65.5
(18.6)
74.5
(23.6)
84.4
(29.1)
83.5
(28.6)
75.3
(24.1)
62.9
(17.2)
47.5
(8.6)
40.5
(4.7)
60.7
(15.9)
Average low °F (°C)21.3
(−5.9)
23.3
(−4.8)
25.9
(−3.4)
28.4
(−2.0)
33.8
(1.0)
39
(4)
42.4
(5.8)
41.8
(5.4)
35.5
(1.9)
29.3
(−1.5)
25.8
(−3.4)
20.9
(−6.2)
30.6
(−0.8)
Record low °F (°C)−28
(−33)
−22
(−30)
−1
(−18)
9
(−13)
11
(−12)
19
(−7)
24
(−4)
25
(−4)
15
(−9)
−4
(−20)
−16
(−27)
−28
(−33)
−28
(−33)
Average precipitation inches (mm)2.24
(57)
1.45
(37)
1.12
(28)
0.79
(20)
0.78
(20)
0.61
(15)
0.38
(9.7)
0.41
(10)
0.4
(10)
0.95
(24)
2.1
(53)
2.27
(58)
13.49
(343)
Average snowfall inches (cm)8.3
(21)
6.3
(16)
3.5
(8.9)
0.3
(0.76)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.2
(0.51)
3.6
(9.1)
7.9
(20)
30.1
(76)
Average precipitation days978664233510972
Source: [10]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1950 723
1960 602−16.7%
1970 516−14.3%
1980 69634.9%
1990 679−2.4%
2000 95941.2%
2010 2,038112.5%
2019 (est.)2,781 [3] 36.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [11]

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 2,038 people, 847 households, and 557 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,089.8 inhabitants per square mile (420.8/km2). There were 1,109 housing units at an average density of 593.0 per square mile (229.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.9% White, 1.1% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 2.3% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.1% of the population. [2]

There were 847 households, of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.1% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.2% were non-families. 29.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.92. [2]

The median age in the city was 41.4 years. 26.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.9% were from 25 to 44; 30.4% were from 45 to 64; and 14.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.1% male and 51.9% female. [2]

2000 census

Former Hotel Sisters, built in 1912 by local businessman John Dennis. Former Hotel Sisters in Sisters, Oregon.jpg
Former Hotel Sisters, built in 1912 by local businessman John Dennis.

As of the census of 2000, there were 959 people, 397 households, and 262 families residing in the city. The population density was 663.0 people per square mile (255.4/km2). There were 482 housing units at an average density of 333.2 per square mile (128.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.83% White, 1.56% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 1.36% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.59% of the population. [2]

There were 397 households, out of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.6% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.8% were non-families. 25.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.88. [2]

In the city, the population was spread out, with 26.1% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.7 males. [2]

The median income for a household in the city was $35,000, and the median income for a family was $43,977. Males had a median income of $35,563 versus $21,771 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,847. About 7.4% of families and 10.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.3% of those under age 18 and 10.7% of those age 65 or over. [2]

Education

The Sisters area is served by Sisters School District, which is responsible for the education of approximately 1,300 students at four schools:

Sisters is also home to Sisters Christian Academy, a non-denominational Christian school. [12]

Media

The local newspaper is The Nugget Newspaper published weekly on Wednesdays. The Small Farmer's Journal also originates in Sisters.

Events

Recreation

The Three Sisters, the city's namesake mountains Three sisters2.jpg
The Three Sisters, the city's namesake mountains

Sisters is the headquarters of the Sisters District of the Deschutes National Forest. The Sisters Ranger District Office is located at Pine Street and Highway 20. [19] Hiking, biking and horse riding trails go from the city limits into the Three Sisters Wilderness. Sisters Trail Alliance [20] builds and maintains hiking, biking and equestrian trails near the city.

The Sisters area is also home to several mountain biking trails, including the Peterson Ridge Trail and Suttle Lake trails. [21]

Hoodoo ski resort and many snow parks are nearby.

Camp Tamarack is nearby. [22] [23] as is Big Lake Youth Camp operated by Seventh-day Adventists since 1963.

Transportation

Notable people

Related Research Articles

Deschutes County, Oregon County in Central Oregon, United States

Deschutes County is one of the 36 counties in the U.S. state of Oregon. As of the 2010 census, the population was 157,733. The county seat is Bend. The county was created in 1916 out of part of Crook County and was named for the Deschutes River, which itself was named by French-Canadian trappers of the early 19th century. It is the political and economic hub of Central Oregon. Deschutes comprises the Bend, Oregon Metropolitan Statistical Area. Deschutes is Oregon’s fastest-growing county.

Crook County, Oregon U.S. county in Oregon

Crook County is one of the 36 counties in the U.S. state of Oregon. As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,978. The county seat is Prineville. The county is named after George Crook, a U.S. Army officer who served in the American Civil War and various Indian Wars.

La Pine, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

La Pine is a city in Deschutes County, Oregon, United States, incorporated on December 7, 2006.

Terrebonne, Oregon Census-designated place in Oregon, United States

Terrebonne is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Deschutes County, Oregon, United States. It is part of the Bend, Oregon Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,257 at the 2010 census.

Three Rivers, Oregon Census-designated place in Oregon, United States

Three Rivers South is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated community in Deschutes County, Oregon, United States. It is part of the Bend, Oregon Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 3,014 at the 2010 census.

Lyons, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Lyons is a city in Linn County, Oregon, United States. The population was 1,161 at the 2010 census. The center of population of Oregon is located in Lyons.

Sweet Home, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Sweet Home is a city in Linn County, Oregon, United States. The population was 8,925 at the 2010 census. According to the city, "Sweet Home is sometimes referred to as the 'Gateway to the Santiam Playground' due to its proximity to nearby lakes, rivers and the Cascade Mountains."

Adrian, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Adrian is a city in Malheur County, Oregon, United States, near the confluence of the Snake River and the Owyhee River. The population was 177 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Ontario, OR–ID Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Detroit, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Detroit is a city in Marion County, Oregon, United States. It was named for Detroit, Michigan, in the 1890s because of the large number of people from Michigan in the community. The population was 202 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Jefferson, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Jefferson is a city in Marion County, Oregon, United States. It is part of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 3,098 at the 2010 census. It is home to the annual Mint Harvest Festival and is the self-proclaimed "Mint Capital of the World" as well as "Frog Jumping Capital of Oregon." The city sits on the right bank of the Santiam River between Salem and Albany along Oregon Route 164 east of Interstate 5.

Mehama, Oregon CDP in Oregon, United States

Mehama is an unincorporated community in Marion County, Oregon, United States, located on Oregon Route 22 and the North Santiam River. For statistical purposes, the United States Census Bureau has defined Mehama as a census-designated place (CDP). The census definition of the area may not precisely correspond to local understanding of the area with the same name. The population was 283 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Stayton, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Stayton is a city in Marion County, Oregon, United States, located 12 miles (19 km) southeast of the state capital, Salem, on Oregon Route 22. It is south of Sublimity and east of Aumsville. Located on the North Santiam River, Stayton is a regional agricultural and light manufacturing center. The population was 7,644 at the 2010 census. Established in 1872, it was incorporated in 1891. Stayton is part of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Echo, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Echo is a city in Umatilla County, Oregon, United States. The population was 699 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Pendleton–Hermiston Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Ukiah, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Ukiah is a city in Umatilla County, Oregon, United States. The population was 186 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Hermiston-Pendleton Micropolitan Statistical Area. It was named by an early settler after the town of Ukiah, California.

Antelope, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Antelope is a city in Wasco County, Oregon, United States. It had an estimated population of 47 people as of 2012. The town was incorporated in 1901, though it was founded earlier. The City of Antelope was originally a stage and freight wagon road stop on the Old Dalles to Canyon City Trail. Howard Maupin came to Antelope in 1863 to operate a horse ranch, becoming the caretaker of the stage station that was established by Henry Wheeler in 1864. Maupin began raising cattle to provide meat for travelers. Nathan Wallace, who is sometimes credited with being Antelope's first postmaster, acquired the Antelope stage station from Maupin in 1870. Records indicate the community was considered to have been established in 1872.

Maupin, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Maupin is a city in Wasco County, Oregon, United States. Located on the Deschutes River, much of the city's economy is related to the river through outdoor activities, such as fishing and rafting. The population was 418 at the 2010 census.

Forest Grove, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Forest Grove is a city in Washington County, Oregon, United States, 25 miles (40 km) west of Portland. Originally a small farm town, it is now primarily a commuter town in the Portland metro area. Settled in the 1840s, the town was platted in 1850, then incorporated in 1872, making it the first city in Washington County. The population was 21,083 at the 2010 census, an increase of 19.1% over the 2000 figure (17,708).

Gates, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Gates is a city on the border of Linn and Marion counties in Oregon, United States. The population was 471 at the 2010 census. The greater part of Gates' population is in Marion County and the city is primarily under Marion County's jurisdiction.

Idanha, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Idanha is a city on the Marion County/Linn County line in Oregon, United States, on Oregon Route 22 and the Santiam River. The population was 134 at the 2010 census.

Mill City, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Mill City is a city in Linn and Marion counties in the U.S. state of Oregon on Oregon Route 22. The population was 1,855 at the 2010 census. It is on the North Santiam River, downstream from Detroit Lake.

References

  1. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-12-21.
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  4. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. "Oregon Legislative District Population Adjustments" (PDF). Oregon State Legislature. 4 March 2011.[ permanent dead link ]
  6. Moyer, Armond; Moyer, Winifred (1958). The origins of unusual place-names. Keystone Pub. Associates. p. 119.
  7. "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-12-21.
  8. 1 2 Deschutes County 2011 Edition (PDF)
  9. Climate Summary for Sisters, Oregon
  10. "SISTERS, OR (357857)". Western Regional Climate Center. Retrieved November 26, 2015.
  11. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  12. Sisters Christian Academy
  13. Sisters Rodeo
  14. Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show
  15. "Sisters Oregon Guide - Events Calendar". www.sistersoregonguide.com. Retrieved 2018-04-25.
  16. Sisters Folk Festival Archived 2013-06-20 at the Wayback Machine
  17. 4th Friday Artwalks
  18. Artists Studio Tour
  19. The Sisters Country
  20. http://www.sisterstrails.com
  21. http://www.sisterstrails.com/trailmaps.html
  22. "Camp Tamarack slated to reopen in 2014".
  23. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-04. Retrieved 2014-03-04.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

[1]

  1. Sisters Arts Association