Sisters of Charity

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Aid for the Wounded (Sister of Charity), by Alexandre-Marie Guillemin, c. 1865. Walters Art Museum. Alexandre-Marie Guillemin - Aid for the Wounded (Sister of Charity).jpg
Aid for the Wounded (Sister of Charity), by Alexandre-Marie Guillemin, c. 1865. Walters Art Museum.

Many religious communities have the term Sisters of Charity in their name. Some Sisters of Charity communities refer to the Vincentian tradition, or in America to the tradition of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, but others are unrelated. The rule of Vincent de Paul for the Daughters of Charity has been adopted and adapted by at least sixty founders of religious institutes for sisters around the world.

Vincentian Family

The Vincentian Family comprises organizations inspired by the life and work of Vincent de Paul, a 17th-century priest who "transformed the face of France."

Elizabeth Ann Seton 18th and 19th-century American Catholic religious founder and saint

Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton, SC, was the first person born in what would become the United States to be canonized by the Roman Catholic Church. She established the first Catholic girls' school in the nation in Emmitsburg, Maryland, where she also founded the first American congregation of religious sisters, the Sisters of Charity.

Vincent de Paul 17th-century French priest, founder and saint

Vincent de Paul was a French Catholic priest who dedicated himself to serving the poor. He is venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion. He was canonized in 1737. He was renowned for his compassion, humility and generosity. Founder of Congregation of the Mission and Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul.

Contents

History

Glaspalast Munchen 1897 030.jpg

In 1633 Vincent de Paul, a French priest and Louise de Marillac, a widow, established the Company of the Daughters of Charity as a group of women dedicated to serving the "poorest of the poor". They set up soup kitchens, organized community hospitals, established schools and homes for orphaned children, offered job training, taught the young to read and write, and improved prison conditions. Louise de Marillac and Vincent de Paul both died in 1660, and by this time there were more than forty houses of the Daughters of Charity in France, and the sick poor were cared for in their own dwellings in twenty-six parishes in Paris. The French Revolution shut down all convents, but the society was restored in 1801 and eventually spread to Austria, Australia, [1] Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Portugal, Turkey, Britain and the Americas. [2]

Louise de Marillac dedico mucho de su vida a los pobres

Louise de Marillac, also Louise Le Gras was the co-founder, with Vincent de Paul, of the Daughters of Charity. She is venerated as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church.

Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul society of apostolic life

The Company of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul, called in English the Daughters of Charity or Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent De Paul, is a Society of Apostolic Life for women within the Catholic Church. Its members make annual vows throughout their life, which leaves them always free to leave, without need of ecclesiastical permission. They were founded in 1633 and state that they are devoted to serving the poor through the corporal and spiritual works of mercy.

In 1809 American Elizabeth Ann Seton, founded the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's, adapting the rule of the French Daughters of Charity for her Emmitsburg, Maryland community.

In 1817, Mother Seton sent three Sisters to New York City to establish an orphanage. [3] In 1829, four Sisters of Charity from Emmitsburg, Maryland traveled to Cincinnati, to open St. Peter’s Girl’s Orphan Asylum and School. [4] In 1850, the Sulpician priests of Baltimore successfully negotiated that the Emmitsburg community be united with the international community based in Paris. The foundations in New York and Cincinnati decided to become independent diocesan congregations. Six separate religious congregations trace their roots to the beginnings of the Sisters of Charity in Emmitsburg. In addition to the original community of Sisters at Emmitsburg (now part of the Vincentian order), they are based in New York City; Cincinnati, Ohio; Halifax, Nova Scotia; Convent Station, New Jersey; and Greensburg, Pennsylvania.

In 2011, the Daughters of Charity established The Province of St. Louise, bringing together the West Central, East Central, Southeast, and Northeast Provinces of the United States. [5] Los Altos Hills in California remains a separate province. [6]

Sisters of Charity Federation in the Vincentian-Setonian Tradition:

Sisters of Charity Federation in the Vincentian-Setonian Tradition

The Sisters of Charity Federation in the Vincentian-Setonian Tradition is an organization of fourteen congregations of religious women in the Catholic Church who trace their lineage to Saint Elizabeth Seton, Saint Vincent de Paul, and Saint Louise de Marillac.

Many other groups called Sisters of Charity have also founded and operate educational institutions, hospitals and orphanages:

Paris, France

The most famous convent is at 14 Rue du Bac in Paris, France, founded in 1633. This was where Catholics believe Sister Catherine Labouré received the vision of Immaculate Mary on the eve of St. Vincent's feastday, 1830 and the dispensation of the Miraculous Medal.

Irish Sisters

Sisters of Charity are one of the orders involved in labour abuse which caused scandal in Ireland. [15] [16]

In May 2013 it was announced that the new National Maternity Hospital, Dublin would relocate to the site of St. Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, founded in 1834 by Mother Mary Aikenhead, foundress of the Religious Sisters of Charity, [17] with the Sisters having ownership, involvement in management, and representation on the board. This caused outrage and protest. On 29 May 2017, in response to weeks of pressure and public outrage, the Sisters of Charity announced that they were ending their role in St Vincent's Healthcare Group and would not be involved in the ownership or management of the new hospital; the two sisters on the board resigned. [18]

Related Research Articles

Sisters of Mercy religious order

The Religious Sisters of Mercy (R.S.M.) are members of a religious institute of Catholic women founded in 1831 in Dublin, Ireland, by Catherine McAuley (1778–1841). As of 2019, the institute has about 6200 sisters worldwide, organized into a number of independent congregations. They also started many education and health care facilities around the globe.

Society of Saint Vincent de Paul organization

The Society of St Vincent de Paul is an international voluntary organization in the Catholic Church, founded in 1833 for the sanctification of its members by personal service of the poor.

Sisters of Charity of New York

The Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul of New York, most often known simply as the Sisters of Charity of New York, is a religious congregation of sisters in the Catholic Church whose primary missions are education and nursing and who are dedicated in particular to the service of the poor. The motherhouse is located at Mt. St. Vincent in the Riverdale section of the Bronx.

Mary Aikenhead Catholic institute and hospital founder

Mother Mary Frances Aikenhead was born in Daunt's Square off Grand Parade, Cork, Ireland. She was the founder of the Catholic religious institute, the Religious Sisters of Charity, the Sisters of Charity of Australia, and of St. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Columbus diocese of the Catholic Church

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Columbus is a Roman Catholic diocese in the Ecclesiastical Province of Cincinnati covering 23 counties in the U.S. state of Ohio. The episcopal see of the diocese is situated at Columbus. The diocese was erected on March 3, 1868 by Pope Pius IX out of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. On October 21, 1944 the diocese lost territory when Pope Pius XII erected the Diocese of Steubenville.

Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth Roman Catholic apostolic congregation of pontifical right

The Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth are a Roman Catholic apostolic congregation of pontifical right, based in the Convent Station area of Morris Township, New Jersey, USA. The religious order was established in 1859 in Newark, New Jersey, following the example of Elizabeth Ann Seton's community that was founded in 1809 in Emmitsburg, Maryland.

The Vincentian Studies Institute of the United States (VSI), at DePaul University, Chicago, is a Roman Catholic organization to promote the Vincentian Family.

Mary O'Connell was an Irish immigrant to the United States, who became a Roman Catholic religious sister. A Sister of Charity of Cincinnati, she served with distinction as a nurse on the front lines of the American Civil War. Her work with the wounded and in health care in general caused her to be known as "the angel of the battlefield" and "the Florence Nightingale of America." Her portrait hangs in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC.

The Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill were founded by Sister Aloysia Lowe. In 1870, she and sisters Blanche O'Keefe, Maria Theresa O'Donnell, Maria Kavanaugh and two novices were sent to western Pennsylvania from the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati and began their work, founding and staffing schools. The sisters later expanded their work to include healthcare.

Vincentian Sisters of Charity

The Vincentian Sisters of Charity were an American religious congregation of Religious Sisters founded in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1902 to serve the Slovak American immigrant population in Pennsylvania.

The Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati were founded in 1852 by Mother Margaret Farrell George, by the separation of the community from the Sisters of Charity in Emmitsburg, Maryland. the motherhouse of the community is at Mount Saint Joseph, Ohio.

The Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul were founded on May 11, 1849, when the four founding Sisters of Charity arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia, from New York City; this has been designated a National Historic Event.

Mary Xavier Mehegan Irish-born foundress of the New Jersey Sisters of Charity

Mother Mary Xavier Mehegan, S.C., founded the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth and opened New Jersey's first four-year college for women.

The Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy is a Roman Catholic religious institute founded by Bishop John England of the Diocese of Charleston in South Carolina, in 1829 as the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy. In 1949 the word "Charity" was added to the congregation's name, in order to identify it more explicitly with others that follow the Rule of Life of St. Vincent de Paul. They came to serve throughout the Eastern United States. The members of the congregation use the postnominal initials of O.L.M.

Sisters of Charity of Australia

The Sisters of Charity of Australia is a congregation of Religious Sisters in the Catholic Church who have served the people of Australia since 1838.

The Institute of the Sisters of Charity of Saints Bartolomea Capitanio and Vincenza Gerosa (SCCG) also known as the Sisters of Maria Bambina had its origins in a house which the people called "Conventino" in Lovere, Italy. It was founded by a young woman of 26 named Bartolomea Capitanio in 1832. Bartolomea was helped in her project by Catherine Gerosa, a simple and wealthy lady of Lovere who later took the name of Sister Vincenza, in honor of St. Vincent de Paul.

References

  1. M. Dunstan, The Sisters of Charity in Australia, Journal of the Australian Catholic Historical Society, 1 (1) (1954), 17-29.
  2. Randolph, Bartholomew. "Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 3. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1908. 7 Jan. 2015
  3. "Our History", Sisters of Charity of New York
  4. Schwab, Sarah. "Schools: An Irish Education", The Irish in Cincinnati, University of Cincinnati
  5. Daughters of Charity, Province of St. Louise
  6. Daughters of Charity, Los Altos Hills Province
  7. http://www.daughtersofcharity.org/our-legacy/
  8. Sisters of Charity of New York Archived 2013-09-02 at Archive.today
  9. Sisters of Charity of St. Elizabeth Archived 2013-12-25 at the Wayback Machine
  10. Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati
  11. Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth
  12. Sisters of Charity of St. Augustine
  13. Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of the Church
  14. Sisters of Charity of Saints Bartolomea Capitanio and Vincenza Gerosa Archived 2014-01-02 at the Wayback Machine
  15. "Sisters who ran Magdalene laundries are being treated unjustly". The Irish Times. Retrieved 2017-03-08.
  16. Reilly, Gavan. "Religious orders offer apology for abuse in Magdalene Laundries". TheJournal.ie. Retrieved 2017-03-08.
  17. Reilly, Gavan (27 May 2013). "National Maternity Hospital to leave Holles St in €150m move". TheJournal.ie. Retrieved 2013-06-18.
  18. McDonald, Henry (29 May 2017). "Sisters of Charity give up role in Dublin maternity hospital". The Guardian. Retrieved 29 May 2017.