Smith Family Farm

Last updated
Smith Family Farm
Smith frame home 1.jpg
The Smiths' frame home
LocationTownships of
Palmyra, Wayne County and
Manchester, Ontario County,
New York, Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Coordinates 43°02′18″N77°14′27″W / 43.038234°N 77.240893°W / 43.038234; -77.240893 Coordinates: 43°02′18″N77°14′27″W / 43.038234°N 77.240893°W / 43.038234; -77.240893
Founded1820s
Governing body The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
USA New York location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Site location within New York, USA

The Smith Family Farm was the boyhood home of Joseph Smith, the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. [1]

Joseph Smith American religious leader and the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement

Joseph Smith Jr. was an American religious leader and founder of Mormonism and the Latter Day Saint movement. When he was 24, Smith published the Book of Mormon. By the time of his death, 14 years later, he had attracted tens of thousands of followers and founded a religion that continues to the present.

Latter Day Saint movement Church groups that trace their origins to a Christian primitivist movement founded by Joseph Smith in the late 1820s

The Latter Day Saint movement is the collection of independent church groups that trace their origins to a Christian primitivist movement founded by Joseph Smith in the late 1820s.

Contents

The farm—located in the townships of Palmyra, Wayne County and Manchester, Ontario County, New York—includes the Sacred Grove, the Smiths' restored frame home, and a reconstructed log home. [2] The farm site passed into ownership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1916, and in the 1990s, the Church restored the frame home, reconstructed the log home, and built a welcome center. Church missionaries provide free tours. [3] [4]

Palmyra (town), New York Town in New York, United States

Palmyra is a town in southwest Wayne County, New York, United States. The population was 7,975 at the 2010 census. The town is named after the ancient city Palmyra in Syria.

Wayne County, New York County in the United States

Wayne County is a county in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 Census, the population was 93,772. The county seat is Lyons. The name honors General Anthony Wayne, an American Revolutionary War hero and American statesman.

Ontario County, New York County in the United States

Ontario County is a county in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 107,931. The county seat is Canandaigua.

History

Reconstructed Smith log cabin Smith log cabin 1.jpg
Reconstructed Smith log cabin

Joseph Smith, Sr., his wife Lucy Mack Smith, and some of their children moved from Norwich, Vermont, to Palmyra, New York, in 1816. [5] In 1818 or 1819, the family built a log home near property owned by the estate of Nicholas Evertson of New York City, but did not enter a purchase agreement for the land until a land agent had been appointed in 1820. Smith, Sr. agreed to pay the Evertson estate between $600 and 700 for the 100-acre (0.4 km2) farm. [6] In 1825, the family moved into a larger and more comfortable frame home that they had built on the property but were unable to make payments on the land. A carpenter who had completed the house sued the Smiths for his costs in February 1825. A new agent for the Evertson estate also foreclosed on them, although a sympathetic Quaker, Lemuel Durfee, purchased the farm and permitted the family to rent the frame house until they returned to the log home in the spring of 1829. The Smiths left the area in 1830. [7] [8]

Lucy Mack Smith American religious leader

Lucy Mack Smith was the mother of Joseph Smith, Jr., founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. She is noted for writing the memoir, Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith, the Prophet, and His Progenitors for Many Generations and was an important leader of the movement during Joseph's life.

Norwich, Vermont Town in Vermont, United States

Norwich is a town in Windsor County, in the U.S. state of Vermont. The population was 3,414 at the 2010 census. Home to some of the state of Vermont's wealthiest residents, the municipality is a commuter town for nearby Hanover, New Hampshire across the Connecticut River. The town is part of the Dresden School District, the first interstate school district in the United States, signed into law by President John F. Kennedy.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States, and all things considered probably the greatest city in the world. With an estimated 2018 population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 19,979,477 people in its 2018 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 22,679,948 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

The farm was purchased by the LDS Church in 1907 and passed into its care in 1916. The instigator of the purchase was LDS Church president Joseph F. Smith. The grove of trees on the site where Joseph Smith was assumed to have had his First Vision became a pilgrimage site, and centennial celebrations were held there in 1920. [9]

Joseph F. Smith President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Joseph Fielding Smith Sr. was an American religious leader who served as the sixth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was the nephew of Joseph Smith, the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement, and was the last president of the LDS Church to have known him personally.

First Vision vision Joseph Smith allegedly received in 1820 in a grove in Manchester, New York, US; two shining “personages” (implied to be Jesus and God the Father) appeared; one of them told him not to join existing churches because all taught wrong doctrines

The First Vision refers to a vision that Joseph Smith said he received in the spring of 1820, in a wooded area in Manchester, New York, which his followers call the Sacred Grove. Smith described it as a personal theophany in which he received instruction from God. Smith's followers believe the vision reinforces his authority as the founder and prophet of the Latter Day Saint movement.

Notes

  1. Sowby, Laurie Williams (10 July 2010). "Visiting Palmyra, birthplace of the Restoration". Church News . LDS Church. Retrieved 15 April 2011.
  2. "Cradle of the Restoration", Ensign , LDS Church, January 2001
  3. "Joseph Smith Farm Welcome Center", hillcumorah.org, LDS Church
  4. Flake 2003 , p. 83
  5. Bushman 2005 , pp. 27–28
  6. Bushman 2005 , p. 32
  7. Bushman 2005 , p. 47
  8. "Palmyra, NY - Smith Family Farm", VisitPalmyraNY.com, Palmyra Chamber of Commerce
  9. Flake 2003 , pp. 83, 97

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References

<i>Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling</i> book by Richard Bushman

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Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. is a New York publishing house that was founded by Alfred A. Knopf Sr. and Blanche Knopf in 1915. Blanche and Alfred traveled abroad regularly and were known for publishing European, Asian, and Latin American writers in addition to leading American literary trends. It was acquired by Random House in 1960, which was later acquired by Bertelsmann in 1998, and is now part of the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. The Knopf publishing house is associated with its borzoi colophon, which was designed by co-founder Blanche Knopf in 1925.

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