Soviet Super Cup

Last updated
Soviet Super Cup
Founded1977 (introduced)
Abolished1989
Region Soviet Union
Number of teams2
Last championsDnipro Dnipropetrovsk
Most successful club(s) Dynamo Kyiv
(3 titles)

The USSR Super Cup, or Season's Cup (Russian : Кубок сезона) was an unofficial exhibition game (or game series) not sanctioned by the Football Federation of the Soviet Union and that featured the winners of the previous season's Soviet Top League and USSR Cup in a one- or two-legged playoff for the trophy.

Contents

History

The mini-tournament was conducted on the initiative of the Komsomolskaya Pravda editor's administration out of Moscow. The tournament was unofficial and never was part of the Football Federation of the Soviet Union. It was played seven times in the last 15 years of Soviet football. It was not until 1983 that the Super Cup was played every year. The Super Cup was made to take place during midseason and further complicated clubs' schedules.

In 1987, with Spartak Moscow winning league honors and Dynamo Kyiv winning the USSR Cup, the Super Cup match was scheduled to take place in Chişinău, Moldova. However, the match never took place because of inadequate facilities in Chişinău. The last USSR Super Cup took place in Sochi, Russia, where the match was played in front of 1,500 fans.

Finals by year

1977 Season's Cup

Dinamo Moscow 1 0 Dinamo Kiev
Minayev Soccerball shade.svg 54' Report
Tbilisi, Lenin's Dinamo Stadium
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: G.Bakanidze (Tbilisi)

1981 Season's Cup

Dinamo Kiev 1 1
5 4 (pen.) (a.e.t.)
Shakhter Donetsk
Boiko Soccerball shade.svg 41'
Report Kravchenko Soccerball shade.svg 52'
Simferopol, Lokomotiv Stadium
Attendance: unknown
Referee: A.Mushkovets (Moscow)

1984 Season's Cup , consisted out of two games

Shakhter Donetsk 2 1 Dnepr Dnepropetrovsk
Vyshnevsky Soccerball shade.svg 54' (o.g.)
Morozov Soccerball shade.svg 54'
Report Litovchenko Soccerball shade.svg 40'
Donetsk, Shakhtar Stadium
Attendance: 32,840
Referee: V.Butenko (Moscow)
Dnepr Dnepropetrovsk 1 1 Shakhter Donetsk
Fedorenko Soccerball shade.svg 70'
Litovchenko Red card.svg
Report Sokolovsky Soccerball shade.svg 89'
Pokidin Red card.svg
Dnipropetrovsk, Meteor Stadium
Attendance: 29,500
Referee: V.Kuznetsov  [ ru ] (Omsk)

Shakhtar won the Cup play-off 3-2


1985 Season's Cup , consisted out of two games

Zenit Leningrad 2 1 Dinamo Moscow
Pozdnyakov Soccerball shade.svg 33' (o.g.)
Gerasimov Soccerball shade.svg 71'
Report Ataulin Soccerball shade.svg 5'
Leningrad, Kirov Stadium
Attendance: 31,000
Referee: V.Miminoshvili (Tbilisi)
Dinamo Moscow 0 1 Zenit Leningrad
Report Melnikov Soccerball shade.svg 20'
Moscow, Dynamo Stadium
Attendance: 12,200
Referee: M.Stupar (Ivano-Frankivsk)

Zenit won the Cup play-off 3-1


1986 USSR Super Cup

Dinamo Kiev 2 2 (a.e.t.) Shakhter Donetsk
Shcherbakov Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Yevtushenko Soccerball shade.svg 118'
Report Sokolovsky Soccerball shade.svg 54'
Kravchenko Soccerball shade.svg 117'
Penalties
3–1
Kiev, Republican Stadium
Attendance: 65,300
Referee: A.Spirin (Moscow)

1987 USSR Super Cup

Torpedo Moscow 1 1 (a.e.t.) Dinamo Kiev
Shirinbekov Soccerball shade.svg 47' Report Belanov Soccerball shade.svg 81'
Penalties
4–5

1988 USSR Super Cup

Spartak Moscow suspended Dinamo Kiev
[ Report]

1989 USSR Super Cup

Dnepr Dnepropetrovsk 3 1 (a.e.t.) Metallist Kharkov
Shakhov Soccerball shade.svg 64' (pen)
Son Soccerball shade.svg 97'
Lyuty Soccerball shade.svg 103'
Report Adzhoyev Soccerball shade.svg 62'
Sochi, Central Stadium
Attendance: 1,500
Referee: A.Kirillov (Moscow)

Winners by year

YearLocationWinnerScoreRunner-up
1977 Tbilisi, Flag of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg  Georgia Flag of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.svg Dynamo Moscow
(qualified as cup winner)
1 – 0 Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg Dynamo Kyiv
(qualified as league winner)
1981 Simferopol, Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg  Ukraine Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg Dynamo Kyiv
(qualified as league winner)
1 – 1 (aet)
5 – 4 (penalties)
Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg Shakhtar Donetsk
(qualified as cup winner)
1984Leg 1: Donetsk, Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg  Ukraine
Leg 2: Dnipropetrovsk, Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg  Ukraine
Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg Shakhtar Donetsk
(qualified as cup winner)
Leg 1: 2 – 1
Leg 2: 1 – 1
Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk
(qualified as league winner)
1985Leg 1: Leningrad, Flag of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.svg  Russia
Leg 2: Moscow, Flag of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.svg  Russia
Flag of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.svg Zenit Leningrad
(qualified as league winner)
Leg 1: 2 – 1
Leg 2: 1 – 0
Flag of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.svg Dynamo Moscow
(qualified as cup winner)
1986 Kiev, Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg  Ukraine Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg Dynamo Kyiv
(qualified as league winner)
2 – 2 (aet)
3 – 1 (penalties)
Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg Shakhtar Donetsk
(qualified as losing cup finalist)
1987 Moscow, Flag of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.svg  Russia Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg Dynamo Kyiv
(qualified as league winner)
1 – 1 (aet)
5 – 4 (penalties)
Flag of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.svg Torpedo Moscow
(qualified as cup winner)
1988 Chisinau, Flag of Moldavian SSR.svg  Moldavia ppd
1989 Sochi, Flag of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.svg  Russia Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk
(qualified as league winner)
3 – 1 (aet) Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg Metalist Kharkiv
(qualified as cup winner)

Performance by club

ClubRepublicWinnersRunners-upYears won
Dynamo Kyiv UKR311981, 1986, 1987
Shakhtar Donetsk UKR121984
Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk UKR111988
Dynamo Moscow RUS111977
Zenit Leningrad RUS101985
Metalist Kharkiv UKR01
Torpedo Moscow RUS01
Total77

Performance by republic

RepublicWinnersRunners-UpWinning Clubs
Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.svg  Ukrainian SSR 55 Dynamo Kyiv (3), Shakhtar Donetsk (1), Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk (1)
Flag of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.svg  Russian SFSR 22 Dynamo Moscow (1), Zenit Leningrad (1)
Total77

See also

National super cups of former Soviet republics:

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