Omsk

Last updated
Omsk

Омск
Omsk Collage 2016.png
Flag of Omsk.svg
Flag
Omsk coat of arms 2014.png
Coat of arms
Location of Omsk
Russia edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Omsk
Location of Omsk
Outline-Omskaya.svg
Red pog.svg
Omsk
Omsk (Omsk Oblast)
Coordinates: 54°59′N73°22′E / 54.983°N 73.367°E / 54.983; 73.367 Coordinates: 54°59′N73°22′E / 54.983°N 73.367°E / 54.983; 73.367
Country Russia
Federal subject Omsk Oblast [1]
FoundedAugust 2, 1716 [2]
City status since1782 [3]
Government
  Body City Council [4]
  Mayor [5] Oksana Fadina [5]
Area
[3]
  Total572.9 km2 (221.2 sq mi)
Elevation
90 m (300 ft)
Population
  Total1,154,116
  Estimate 
(2018) [7]
1,172,070 (+1.6%)
  Rank 7th in 2010
  Density2,000/km2 (5,200/sq mi)
  Subordinated to city of oblast significance of Omsk [1]
   Capital ofOmsk Oblast [1] , city of oblast significance of Omsk [1]
  Urban okrugOmsk Urban Okrug [8]
   Capital ofOmsk Urban Okrug [8]
Time zone UTC+6 (MSK+3 Blue pencil.svg [9] )
Postal code(s) [10]
644xxx
Dialing code(s) +7 3812 [11]
City DayFirst Saturday of August [12]
Twin towns Pavlodar, Petropavl, Łódź, Lublin, Gdańsk, Simferopol, Kaifeng, Púchov, Karlovy Vary, Jinju, Milwaukee, Angarsk, Antalya, Bratsk, Bryansk, Burgas, Fuzhou, Gomel, Gorno-Altaysk, Kaliningrad, Krasnoyarsk, Minsk, Novosibirsk, Penza, Stavropol, Chelyabinsk, Ulan-Ude Blue pencil.svg
OKTMO ID52701000001
Website www.admomsk.ru

Omsk ( /ɒmsk/ ; Russian :Омск,IPA:  [omsk] , Kazakh : Омбы, translit. Omby) is a city and the administrative center of Omsk Oblast, Russia, located in southwestern Siberia 2,236 kilometers (1,389 mi) [13] from Moscow. With a population of 1,154,116, it is Russia's second-largest city east of the Ural Mountains after Novosibirsk, and seventh by size nationally. [6] Omsk acts as an essential transport node, serving as a train station for Trans-Siberian Railway and as a staging post for the Irtysh River.

Russian language East Slavic language

Russian is an East Slavic language, which is official in the Russian Federation, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, as well as being widely used throughout Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, the Caucasus and Central Asia. It was the de facto language of the Soviet Union until its dissolution on 25 December 1991. Although, nowadays, nearly three decades after the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russian is used in official capacity or in public life in all the post-Soviet nation-states, as well as in Israel and Mongolia, the rise of state-specific varieties of this language tends to be strongly denied in Russia, in line with the Russian World ideology.

Kazakh language Turkic language

Kazakh or Kazak belongs to the Kipchak branch of the Turkic languages. It is closely related to Nogai, Kyrgyz, and Karakalpak. Kazakh is the official language of the Republic of Kazakhstan and a significant minority language in the Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture in Xinjiang, China and in the Bayan-Ölgii Province of Mongolia. Kazakh is also spoken by many ethnic Kazakhs through the former Soviet Union, Afghanistan, Iran, Turkey, and Germany.

The classification system of the types of inhabited localities in Russia, the former Soviet Union, and some other post-Soviet states has certain peculiarities compared with the classification systems in other countries.

Contents

During the Imperial era, Omsk used to be the seat of the Governor General of Western Siberia and, later, of the Governor General of the Steppes. For a brief period during the Russian Civil War in 1918–1920, it served as the capital of the anti-Bolshevik Russian State and held the imperial gold reserves.

Russian Empire Former country, 1721–1917

The Russian Empire, also known as Imperial Russia or simply Russia, was an empire that existed across Eurasia and North America from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.

Steppe ecoregion in the montane grasslands and shrublands

In physical geography, a steppe is an ecoregion, in the montane grasslands and shrublands and temperate grasslands, savannas and shrublands biomes, characterized by grassland plains without trees apart from those near rivers and lakes. In South Africa, they are referred to as veld. The prairie of North America is an example of a steppe, though it is not usually called such. A steppe may be semi-arid or covered with grass or shrubs or both, depending on the season and latitude. The term is also used to denote the climate encountered in regions too dry to support a forest but not dry enough to be a desert. The soil is typically of chernozem type.

Russian Civil War multi-party war in the former Russian Empire, November 1917-October 1922

The Russian Civil War was a multi-party war in the former Russian Empire immediately after the two Russian Revolutions of 1917, as many factions vied to determine Russia's political future. The two largest combatant groups were the Red Army, fighting for the Bolshevik form of socialism led by Vladimir Lenin, and the loosely allied forces known as the White Army, which included diverse interests favoring political monarchism, economic capitalism and alternative forms of socialism, each with democratic and antidemocratic variants. In addition, rival militant socialists and nonideological Green armies fought against both the Bolsheviks and the Whites. Eight foreign nations intervened against the Red Army, notably the former Allied military forces from the World War and the pro-German armies. The Red Army eventually defeated the White Armed Forces of South Russia in Ukraine and the army led by Admiral Aleksandr Kolchak to the east in Siberia in 1919. The remains of the White forces commanded by Pyotr Nikolayevich Wrangel were beaten in Crimea and evacuated in late 1920. Lesser battles of the war continued on the periphery for two more years, and minor skirmishes with the remnants of the White forces in the Far East continued well into 1923. The war ended in 1923 in the sense that Bolshevik communist control of the newly formed Soviet Union was now assured, although armed national resistance in Central Asia was not completely crushed until 1934. There were an estimated 7,000,000–12,000,000 casualties during the war, mostly civilians. The Russian Civil War has been described by some as the greatest national catastrophe that Europe had yet seen.

Omsk is the administrative center of the Siberian Cossack Host. It also serves as the episcopal see of the bishop of Omsk and Tara, as well as the administrative seat of the Imam of Siberia. The mayor is Oksana Fadina.

Siberian Cossacks

Siberian Cossacks were Cossacks who settled in the Siberian region of Russia from the end of the 16th century, following Yermak Timofeyevich's conquest of Siberia. In early periods, practically the whole Russian population in Siberia, especially the serving-men, were called Cossacks, but only in the loose sense of being neither land-owners nor peasants. Most of these people came from northwest Russia and had little connection to the Don Cossacks or Zaporozhian Cossacks.

Episcopal see the main administrative seat held by a bishop

An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction.

Tara, Omsk Oblast Town in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Tara is a town in Omsk Oblast, Russia, located at the confluence of the Tara and Irtysh Rivers at a point where the forested country merges into the steppe, about 300 kilometers (190 mi) north of Omsk, the administrative center of the oblast. Population: 27,318 (2010 Census); 26,888 (2002 Census); 26,152 (1989 Census).

History

The wooden fort of Omsk was built in 1716 by a cossack unit led by Ivan Buchholz to protect the expanding Russian frontier along the Ishim and the Irtysh rivers against the Kyrgyz and Dzungar nomads of the Steppes. [14] In 1768 Om fortress was relocated. The original Tobolsk and the restored Tara gates, along with the original German Lutheran Church and several public buildings are left from that time. Omsk was granted town status in 1782. [15]

Ishim River river in Kazakhstan and Russia

Ishim River is a river running through Kazakhstan and Russia. It is 2,450 kilometres (1,520 mi) long; its average discharge is 56.3 cubic metres per second (1,990 cu ft/s). It is a left tributary of the Irtysh River. The Ishim River is partly navigable in its lower reaches. The upper course of the Ishim passes through Astana, the capital of Kazakhstan. In Russia, the river travels through a vast marshland for its course, and has countless meanders and oxbow lakes. The river freezes from late November until March.

Irtysh River river in China, Kazakhstan and Russia

The Irtysh River is a river in Russia, China, and Kazakhstan. It is the chief tributary of the Ob River.

The Kyrgyz people are a Turkic ethnic group native to Central Asia, primarily Kyrgyzstan.

In 1822 Omsk became an administrative capital of Western Siberia and later in 1882 the center of the vast Steppes region (today the northern part of Kazakhstan) and Akmolinsk Oblast, in particular acquiring several churches and cathedrals of various denominations, mosques, a synagogue, the governor-general's mansion, and a military academy. [16] But as the frontier receded and its military importance diminished, the town fell into lethargy. For that time Omsk became a major center of the Siberian exile. From 1850 to 1854 Fyodor Dostoyevsky served his sentence in an Omsk katorga prison.

Kazakhstan transcontinental republic in Asia and Europe

Kazakhstan, officially the Republic of Kazakhstan, is the world's largest landlocked country, and the ninth largest in the world, with an area of 2,724,900 square kilometres (1,052,100 sq mi). It is a transcontinental country largely located in Asia; the most western parts are located in Europe. Kazakhstan is the dominant nation of Central Asia economically, generating 60% of the region's GDP, primarily through its oil/gas industry. It also has vast mineral resources.

Akmolinsk Oblast was an oblast (province) of the Russian Empire. It roughly corresponded to most of present-day northern Kazakhstan and the southern part of Omsk Oblast in Russia. It was formerly part of Kazakh khanate. It was created after the division of the Oblast of Siberia Krygyz into the oblasts Aqmola and Semirechye on 21 October 1868. Its center was Omsk and consisted of uzeys Akmolinsk, Atbasar, Kokchetav, Omsk and Petropavlovsk. It bordered Tobolsk Governorate to the north, Semipalatinsk Oblast to the east, Semirechye Oblast to the northeast, Syr-Darya Oblast to the south, Turgay Oblast to the southwest and Orenburg Governorate to the northwest.

Katorga

Katorga was a system of penal labor in the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union. Prisoners were sent to remote penal colonies in vast uninhabited areas of Siberia and Russian Far East where voluntary settlers and workers were never available in sufficient numbers. The prisoners had to perform forced labor under harsh conditions.

Development of the city was catalyzed with the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway in the 1890s that affected significance of Omsk as a logistic hub. Many trade companies established stores and offices in Omsk defining the character of the city center. British, Dutch, and German consulates were established roughly at the same time in order to represent their commercial interests. The pinnacle of development for pre-revolutionary Omsk was the Siberian Exposition of Agriculture and Industry in 1910. Popularity of the World Fairs contributed to the image of Omsk as the "Chicago of Siberia". [17]

Chicago City in Illinois, United States

Chicago, officially the City of Chicago, is the most populous city in Illinois and the third most populous city in the United States. With an estimated population of 2,716,450 (2017), it is the most populous city in the Midwestern United States. Chicago is the county seat of Cook County, the second most populous county in the United States, and the principal city of the Chicago metropolitan area, which is often referred to as "Chicagoland." The Chicago metropolitan area, at nearly 10 million people, is the third-largest in the United States; the fourth largest in North America ; and the third largest metropolitan area in the world by land area.

Soon after the October Revolution, anti-Bolshevik White forces seized control of Omsk. The "Provisional All-Russian Government" was established here in 1918, headed by the Arctic explorer and decorated war hero Admiral Kolchak. Omsk was proclaimed the capital of Russia, and its central bank was tasked with safekeeping the former empire's gold reserves. These were guarded by a garrison of former Czechoslovakian POWs trapped in Siberia by the chaos of World War I and the subsequent Revolution. [ citation needed ] Omsk became a prime target for the Red Army leadership, which viewed it as a major target of their Siberian campaign and eventually forced Kolchak and his government to abandon the city and retreat along the Trans-Siberian eastward to Irkutsk. Bolshevik forces entered the city in 1919.

Soviet period

Pushkin State Library Omsk Pushkin Library.jpg
Pushkin State Library

The Soviet government preferred the young Novonikolayevsk (later known as Novosibirsk) as the administrative center of Western Siberia, prompting the mass transfer of administrative, cultural, and educational functions from Omsk. This somewhat stunted Omsk's growth and sparked a continuing rivalry between the two cities. [18] Omsk received new life as a result of World War II. Because it was both far from the fighting and had a well-developed infrastructure, Omsk provided a perfect haven for much of the industry evacuated away from the frontlines in 1941. Additionally, contingency plans were made to transfer the provisional Soviet capital to Omsk in the event of a German victory during the Battle of Moscow (October 1941 to January 1942). [19] At the end of the war, Omsk remained a major industrial center, subsequently becoming a leader in Soviet military production.

Leningrad bridge over the Irtysh Lenmostzakat.jpg
Leningrad bridge over the Irtysh

Military industries which moved to Omsk included part of the OKMO tank-design bureau in 1941, and S.M. Kirov Factory no. 185 from Chelyabinsk, in 1962. The Kirov Factory and Omsk Transmash design bureau (KBTM) produced T-80 tanks from the 1970s, and were responsible for the BTR-T, TOS-1, and the prototype Black Eagle tank. Omsk Transmash declared bankruptcy in 2002.

In the 1950s, following the development of the oil and natural-gas field in Siberia, an oil-refining complex was built, along with an entire "town of oil workers", expanding Omsk northward along the Irtysh. It is currently the largest such complex in Russia. Gazprom Neft, the parent company, is the largest employer in the city, wielding its tax rates as leverage in negotiations with municipal and regional authorities.

Post-Soviet period

Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Omsk experienced a period of economic instability and political stagnation. Most of the city's large businesses, which had previously been state owned, were fought over by members of the former party elite, the emerging nouveau riche, and fast growing criminal syndicates. The most notorious cases involved the privatization of Sibneft, a major oil company, which dragged on for several years. Until the end of the 1990s, political life in Omsk was defined by an ongoing feud between the oblast and city authorities. The resulting conflict made at least two points of view available to the public and served as the impetus for some improvements to the city's infrastructure and cultural life. These included the construction of new leisure parks and the renovation of the city's historic center, the establishment of the annual Siberian International Marathon, and of the annual City Days Festival. Despite this, internal political competition drained the Omsk's resources and served as a major obstacle for smooth government operations and city development.

Geography

Location

Omsk is situated on the south of the West Siberian Plain along the banks of the north-flowing Irtysh at its confluence with the Om River. The city has an elevation of 87 meters (285 ft) above mean sea level at its highest point.

Omsk is an important railroad hub, and is the junction point for the northern and southern branches of the Trans-Siberian Railway. The city also serves as a major hub for the regional highway network. River-port facilities handle both passengers and freight, giving the city access to navigating the extensive waterways of the Irtysh and Ob River. The waterways connect Omsk with the coal and mineral-mining towns further up the river in Kazakhstan, as well as with the oil, natural gas and lumber operations of northern Siberia. Omsk is served by the Tsentralny Airport, which offers access to domestic and international (primarily, German and Kazakh) destinations, making the city an important aviation hub for Siberia and the Russian Far East.

Climate

Omsk has a humid continental climate characterized by dramatic swings of weather. Average daily temperatures, taken over the past three decades, are +20 °C (68 °F) for July and −17 °C (1 °F) for January, although temperatures can reach +40 °C (104 °F) in the summer and drop to −45 °C (−49 °F) in the winter. On average, Omsk sees over 300 sunny days a year (2201 hours). The average annual precipitation is 415 millimeters (16.3 in).

Climate data for Omsk
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)4.2
(39.6)
3.6
(38.5)
14.1
(57.4)
31.3
(88.3)
35.5
(95.9)
40.1
(104.2)
40.4
(104.7)
38.0
(100.4)
32.9
(91.2)
27.4
(81.3)
16.1
(61.0)
4.5
(40.1)
40.4
(104.7)
Average high °C (°F)−12
(10)
−10.3
(13.5)
−2.5
(27.5)
9.1
(48.4)
19.0
(66.2)
23.9
(75.0)
25.3
(77.5)
22.7
(72.9)
15.9
(60.6)
8.1
(46.6)
−3.7
(25.3)
−9.8
(14.4)
7.1
(44.8)
Daily mean °C (°F)−16.3
(2.7)
−15.0
(5.0)
−7.3
(18.9)
3.7
(38.7)
12.5
(54.5)
18.0
(64.4)
19.6
(67.3)
16.9
(62.4)
10.4
(50.7)
3.5
(38.3)
−7.3
(18.9)
−13.8
(7.2)
2.1
(35.8)
Average low °C (°F)−20.5
(−4.9)
−19.4
(−2.9)
−12
(10)
−1.0
(30.2)
6.3
(43.3)
12.0
(53.6)
14.2
(57.6)
11.6
(52.9)
5.7
(42.3)
−0.3
(31.5)
−10.5
(13.1)
−17.9
(−0.2)
−2.7
(27.1)
Record low °C (°F)−45.1
(−49.2)
−45.5
(−49.9)
−41.1
(−42.0)
−26.4
(−15.5)
−12.9
(8.8)
−3.1
(26.4)
2.1
(35.8)
−1.7
(28.9)
−7.6
(18.3)
−28.1
(−18.6)
−41.2
(−42.2)
−44.7
(−48.5)
−45.5
(−49.9)
Average precipitation mm (inches)23
(0.9)
18
(0.7)
17
(0.7)
21
(0.8)
35
(1.4)
51
(2.0)
66
(2.6)
54
(2.1)
37
(1.5)
30
(1.2)
34
(1.3)
29
(1.1)
415
(16.3)
Average rainy days10.431017171819181351122
Average snowy days282518920.2001112228144
Average relative humidity (%)80787664546068707074818171
Mean monthly sunshine hours 6812518423528431932124818010571612,201
Source #1: Pogoda.ru.net [20]
Source #2: NOAA (sun, 1961–1990) [21]

Administrative and municipal status

Within the framework of administrative divisions, it is incorporated as the city of oblast significance of Omsk—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts. [1] As a municipal division, the city of oblast significance of Omsk is incorporated as Omsk Urban Okrug. [8]

Demographics

The population in Omsk had been steadily rising, according to the records: from 31,000 in 1881 to 53,050 in 1900 and to 1,148,418 in 1989. [22] The 2002 Census recorded that the population had declined to 1,134,016, [23] but it rebounded marginally, according to the 2010 Census, which listed the population of 1,154,116. [6]

Architecture

Omsk Dormition Cathedral Hram v Omske.jpg
Omsk Dormition Cathedral

The architectural centerpiece of the city is an ensemble of buildings along Lyubinsky Avenue/Lenina Street, anchored by the former Gostiny Dvor, and flanked by two chapels. The area is an eclectic mix of architectural styles, dominated by Art-Nouveau, Neoclassical and Second Empire.

Closer to the confluence of the Om and the Irtysh are the few surviving sombre buildings of the 18th-century fortress. The largest and most opulent church in the city is the Dormition Cathedral, a five-domed edifice in the Russian Revival style, consecrated in 1896, demolished by the Soviets, and restored in the first decade of the 21st century. [ citation needed ]

Another area of interest is Nikolsky Avenue-Krasnykh Zor Street, where a line of merchants' wooden houses still stands. The street leads to the Neoclassical cathedral of St. Nicholas, which was commissioned by the Cossacks, designed by Vasily Stasov and consecrated in 1840. It contains various relics of the Siberian Cossacks. [24]

Life and culture

As a prominent educational center, Omsk has a number of museums, theaters, music venues, and educational institutions.

Omsk Vrubel Museum Omsk Vrubel Museum.jpg
Omsk Vrubel Museum

Among Omsk's museums, the most notable are:

Theaters include the Omsk Opera, The Omsk Theater of Drama, The Omsk Circus, Omsk State Music Theater, and a number of smaller venues.

Education

Omsk State Transport University Omsk State Transport University.jpg
Omsk State Transport University

Omsk is home to many institutions of higher learning and several universities:

Sports

Arena Omsk Arena Omsk.jpg
Arena Omsk

Omsk is represented nationally by professional association football and hockey clubs.

ClubSportFoundedCurrent leagueLeague
rank
Stadium
Avangard Omsk Ice Hockey 1950 Kontinental Hockey League 1st Omsk Arena
Omskie Yastreby Ice Hockey 2009 Minor Hockey League Jr. 1st Omsk Arena
Yastreby Omsk Ice Hockey 2012 Minor Hockey League Division B Jr. 2nd Omsk Arena
Omichka Omsk Volleyball 1965Woman's Volleyball Super League1st Blinov SCC
Omichka-2 Volleyball 2009Woman's Supreme League2ndSC Ermak
Irtysh Omsk Football 1946 Russian Second Division 2nd Red Star Stadium
Neftyanik OmskBasketball1965Basketball Superleague B3rdSports Complex Sibirskiy Neftyanik

Transportation

The picture of the Omsk railway station Omsk railway.jpg
The picture of the Omsk railway station

Omsk is a major rail, road, and air hub. The city is served by a station on the Trans-Siberian Railway, and by the Tsentralny Airport. Additionally, Omsk possesses a river port on the Irtysh, offering service to domestic destinations and to cities within Kazakhstan.

Municipal Transport consists of a large bus and trolley, and tram networks, although the latter of these has deteriorated severely since the collapse of the USSR. marshrutkas (shared taxis) supplement municipal transit networks.

A Metro system, proposed in the late 1980s, but postponed for lack of funds, is currently under construction, with the Metro bridge over the Irtysh River. The bridge is already opened for cars (upper level), but the metro (lower level) is still under construction. As a first step, one short line will connect the districts in the northwest with the city center. As of 2017, only one station is open and serves as a pedestrian subway.

Honors

Notable people

Athletes

Twin towns and sister cities

Omsk is twinned with:

Related Research Articles

Isilkul Town in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Isilkul is a town in Omsk Oblast, Russia, located 120 kilometers (75 mi) west of Omsk, the administrative center of the oblast. Population: 24,482 (2010 Census); 26,549 (2002 Census); 26,430 (1989 Census).

Nazyvayevsk Town in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Nazyvayevsk is a town in Omsk Oblast, Russia, located 120 kilometers (75 mi) west of Omsk, the administrative center of the oblast. As of the 2010 Census, its population was 11,615.

Kalachinsk Town in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Kalachinsk is a town in Omsk Oblast, Russia, located on the Om River along the busiest segment of the Trans-Siberian Railway, 100 kilometers (62 mi) east of Omsk, the administrative center of the oblast. Population: 23,556 (2010 Census); 24,247 (2002 Census); 25,014 (1989 Census).

Tyukalinsk Town in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Tyukalinsk is a town in Omsk Oblast, Russia, located 60 kilometers (37 mi) northeast of the Nazyvayevsk railway station on the Trans-Siberian Railway and 120 kilometers (75 mi) northwest of Omsk, the administrative center of the oblast. Population: 11,275 (2010 Census); 12,007 (2002 Census); 12,191 (1989 Census).

Azovsky Nemetsky National District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Azovsky Nemetsky National District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,400 square kilometers (540 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Azovo. Population: 22,925 ; 22,346 (2002 Census). The population of Azovo accounts for 26.2% of the district's total population.

Bolsherechensky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Bolsherechensky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the center of the oblast. The area of the district is 4,300 square kilometers (1,700 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Bolsherechye. Population: 28,486 ; 34,037 (2002 Census); 36,726 (1989 Census). The population of Bolsherechye accounts for 39.6% of the district's total population.

Cherlaksky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Cherlaksky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is in the southeast of the oblast. The area of the district is 4,200 square kilometers (1,600 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Cherlak. Population: 30,344 ; 36,356 (2002 Census); 36,662 (1989 Census). The population of the administrative center accounts for 36.2% of the district's total population.

Kalachinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the oblast. The area of the district is 2,800 square kilometers (1,100 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Kalachinsk. Population: 18,197 ; 21,810 (2002 Census); 22,812 (1989 Census).

Lyubinsky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Lyubinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southwestern central part of the oblast. The area of the district is 3,300 square kilometers (1,300 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Lyubinsky. Population: 37,735 ; 42,123 (2002 Census); 44,283 (1989 Census). The population of the administrative center accounts for 27.1% of the district's total population.

Maryanovsky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Maryanovsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southwest of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,700 square kilometers (660 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Maryanovka. Population: 27,595 ; 27,802 (2002 Census); 30,173 (1989 Census). The population of Maryanovka accounts for 31.3% of the district's total population.

Muromtsevsky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Muromtsevsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the east of the oblast. The area of the district is 6,700 square kilometers (2,600 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Muromtsevo. Population: 23,795 ; 28,380 (2002 Census); 31,935 (1989 Census). The population of Muromtsevo accounts for 45.3% of the district's total population.

Nizhneomsky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Nizhneomsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the east of the oblast. The area of the district is 3,400 square kilometers (1,300 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Nizhnyaya Omka. Population: 15,826 ; 19,766 (2002 Census); 21,779 (1989 Census). The population of the administrative center accounts for 30.5% of the district's total population.

Novovarshavsky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Novovarshavsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the oblast. The area of the district is 2,200 square kilometers (850 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Novovarshavka. Population: 24,450 ; 27,461 (2002 Census); 28,273 (1989 Census). The population of Novovarshavka accounts for 24.1% of the district's total population.

Okoneshnikovsky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Okoneshnikovsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the oblast. The area of the district is 3,100 square kilometers (1,200 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Okoneshnikovo. Population: 14,791 ; 17,280 (2002 Census); 19,744 (1989 Census). The population of Okoneshnikovo accounts for 35.2% of the district's total population.

Pavlogradsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast. The area of the district is 2,500 square kilometers (970 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Pavlogradka. Population: 20,034 ; 21,608 (2002 Census); 23,037 (1989 Census). The population of Pavlogradka accounts for 37.8% of the district's total population.

Tarsky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Tarsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the northeast of the oblast. The area of the district is 15,700 square kilometers (6,100 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Tara. Population: 19,242 ; 22,684 (2002 Census); 25,563 (1989 Census).

Tavrichesky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Tavrichesky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast. The area of the district is 2,800 square kilometers (1,100 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Tavricheskoye. Population: 36,458 ; 38,840 (2002 Census); 47,751 (1989 Census). The population of Tavricheskoye accounts for 36.0% of the district's total population.

Tyukalinsky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Tyukalinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the western central part of the oblast. The area of the district is 6,400 square kilometers (2,500 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Tyukalinsk. Population: 14,831 ; 19,128 (2002 Census); 22,430 (1989 Census).

Ust-Ishimsky District District in Omsk Oblast, Russia

Ust-Ishimsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-two in Omsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the northwest of the oblast. The area of the district is 7,846 square kilometers (3,029 sq mi).} Its administrative center is the rural locality of Ust-Ishim, which, as its name indicates, is located at the confluence of the Ishim River with the Irtysh.

References

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Law #467-OZ
  2. GmbH, Emporis. "Omsk - Buildings - EMPORIS". www.emporis.com.
  3. 1 2 "География Омска: географическое расположение города, районы, улицы в Омске". omsk.infomsk.ru.
  4. "Избирательное право. Официальный портал Администрации города Омска". www.admomsk.ru.
  5. 1 2 "Mayor of Omsk: Curriculum Vitae". www.admomsk.ru.
  6. 1 2 3 Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). "Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1" [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года [2010 All-Russia Population Census] (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service.
  7. "26. Численность постоянного населения Российской Федерации по муниципальным образованиям на 1 января 2018 года". Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  8. 1 2 3 Law #548-OZ
  9. "Об исчислении времени". Официальный интернет-портал правовой информации (in Russian). 3 June 2011. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  10. Почта России. Информационно-вычислительный центр ОАСУ РПО. (Russian Post). Поиск объектов почтовой связи (Postal Objects Search) (in Russian)
  11. "International Dialing Codes - how to call from Azerbaijan – Baku to Russia – Omsk – Omsk". www.timeanddate.com.
  12. "День города Омска. Официальный портал Администрации города Омска". www.admomsk.ru.
  13. "Distance between Moscow russia and Omsk russia". www.mapcrow.info.
  14. Omsk history timeline (in Russian)
  15. "History of the City of Omsk". www.admomsk.ru.
  16. Siberia and the Exile System ISBN   978-1-108-04823-1 p. 480
  17. "thinkrussia.com".
  18. "History of Omsk". kachaloff.narod.ru.
  19. Lecture 3:3: “World War II” – The Battle of Moscow, edb.gov.hk
  20. "Weather and Climate - The Climate of Omsk" (in Russian). Weather and Climate (Погода и климат). Retrieved November 30, 2015.
  21. "Omsk Climate Normals 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration . Retrieved November 30, 2015.
  22. "Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 г. Численность наличного населения союзных и автономных республик, автономных областей и округов, краёв, областей, районов, городских поселений и сёл-райцентров" [All Union Population Census of 1989: Present Population of Union and Autonomous Republics, Autonomous Oblasts and Okrugs, Krais, Oblasts, Districts, Urban Settlements, and Villages Serving as District Administrative Centers]. Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 года [All-Union Population Census of 1989] (in Russian). Институт демографии Национального исследовательского университета: Высшая школа экономики [Institute of Demography at the National Research University: Higher School of Economics]. 1989 via Demoscope Weekly.
  23. Russian Federal State Statistics Service (21 May 2004). "Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек" [Population of Russia, Its Federal Districts, Federal Subjects, Districts, Urban Localities, Rural Localities—Administrative Centers, and Rural Localities with Population of Over 3,000](XLS). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года [All-Russia Population Census of 2002] (in Russian).
  24. Brumfield, William (September 27, 2011). "Omsk: Garrison city on the Irtysh".
  25. "litmuseum — Журнал о французской литературе и жизни во Франции". litmuseum.ru.
  26. "Музей имени М. А. Врубеля". www.vrubel.ru.
  27. "3406 Omsk 1969 - Поиск в Google". books.google.com.

Sources

Further reading

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Omsk at Wikimedia Commons