1717

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1717 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1717
MDCCXVII
Ab urbe condita 2470
Armenian calendar 1166
ԹՎ ՌՃԿԶ
Assyrian calendar 6467
Balinese saka calendar 1638–1639
Bengali calendar 1124
Berber calendar 2667
British Regnal year 3  Geo. 1   4  Geo. 1
Buddhist calendar 2261
Burmese calendar 1079
Byzantine calendar 7225–7226
Chinese calendar 丙申(Fire  Monkey)
4413 or 4353
     to 
丁酉年 (Fire  Rooster)
4414 or 4354
Coptic calendar 1433–1434
Discordian calendar 2883
Ethiopian calendar 1709–1710
Hebrew calendar 5477–5478
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1773–1774
 - Shaka Samvat 1638–1639
 - Kali Yuga 4817–4818
Holocene calendar 11717
Igbo calendar 717–718
Iranian calendar 1095–1096
Islamic calendar 1129–1130
Japanese calendar Kyōhō 2
(享保2年)
Javanese calendar 1640–1641
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4050
Minguo calendar 195 before ROC
民前195年
Nanakshahi calendar 249
Thai solar calendar 2259–2260
Tibetan calendar 阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1843 or 1462 or 690
     to 
阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
1844 or 1463 or 691
August 17: The Siege of Belgrade ends. Belagerung belgrad 1717.jpg
August 17: The Siege of Belgrade ends.

1717 (MDCCXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1717th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 717th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1717, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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April–June

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Date unknown

Births

Maria Theresa of Austria Kaiserin Maria Theresia (HRR).jpg
Maria Theresa of Austria
Johann Joachim Winckelmann Johann Joachim Winckelmann (Raphael Mengs after 1755).jpg
Johann Joachim Winckelmann

Deaths

Maria Sibylla Merian Maria Sibylla Merian portrait colors.jpeg
Maria Sibylla Merian
Jeanne Guyon Mme Guyon.jpg
Jeanne Guyon

Related Research Articles

1720s

The 1720s decade ran from January 1, 1720, to December 31, 1729.

1680 Calendar year

1680 (MDCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1680th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 680th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1680, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1720 Calendar year

1720 (MDCCXX) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1720th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 720th year of the 2nd millennium, the 20th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1720, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1710s

The 1710s decade ran from January 1, 1710, to December 31, 1719.

1716 Calendar year

1716 (MDCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1716th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 716th year of the 2nd millennium, the 16th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1716, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1641 Calendar year

1641 (MDCXLI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1641st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 641st year of the 2nd millennium, the 41st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1641, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1585 Calendar year

1585 (MDLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1585, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1721 Calendar year

1721 (MDCCXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1721st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 721st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 18th century, and the 2nd year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1721, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1718 Calendar year

1718 (MDCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1718th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 718th year of the 2nd millennium, the 18th year of the 18th century, and the 9th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1718, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1719 Calendar year

1719 (MDCCXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1719th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 719th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1719, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Captain Samuel Bellamy, later known as "Black Sam" Bellamy, was an English pirate who operated in the early 18th century. He is best known as the wealthiest pirate in recorded history, and one of the faces of the Golden Age of Piracy. Though his known career as a pirate captain lasted little more than a year, he and his crew captured at least 53 ships. Called "Black Sam" in Cape Cod folklore because he eschewed the fashionable powdered wig in favor of tying back his long black hair with a simple band, Bellamy became known for his mercy and generosity toward those he captured on his raids. This reputation earned him another nickname, the "Prince of Pirates". He likened himself to Robin Hood, with his crew calling themselves "Robin Hood's Men".

<i>Whydah Gally</i> Pirate ship of Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy,

Whydah Gally was a fully rigged galley ship that was originally built as a passenger, cargo, and slave ship. On the return leg of her maiden voyage of the triangle trade, Whydah Gally was captured by the pirate Captain Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, beginning a new role in the Golden Age of Piracy.

Captain Benjamin Hornigold (1680–1719) was an English pirate who operated during the tail end of the Golden Age of Piracy.

Golden Age of Piracy Maritime piracy from the 1650s to the 1730s

The Golden Age of Piracy is a common designation for the period between the 1650s and the 1730s, when maritime piracy was a significant factor in the histories of the Caribbean, the United Kingdom, the Indian Ocean, North America, and West Africa.

Henry Jennings was an 18th-century English privateer from the colony of Bermuda, who served primarily during the War of the Spanish Succession and later served as leader of the pirate haven or "republic" of New Providence.

Laurens Prins, anglicized as Lawrence Prince, was a 17th-century Dutch buccaneer, privateer and an officer under Captain Sir Henry Morgan. He and Major John Morris led one of the columns against Panama in 1671.

Flying Gang Group of Pirates in 18th Century

The Flying Gang was an 18th-century group of pirates who established themselves in Nassau, New Providence in The Bahamas after the destruction of Port Royal in Jamaica. The gang consisted of the most notorious and cunning pirates of the time, buccaneers who terrorized and pillaged the Caribbean until the Royal Navy and infighting brought them to justice. They achieved great fame and wealth by raiding salvagers attempting to recover gold from the sunken Spanish treasure fleet. They established their own codes and governed themselves independent from any of the colonial powers of the time. Nassau was deemed the Republic of Pirates as it attracted many former Privateers looking for work to its shores. The Governor of Bermuda stated that there were over 1000 pirates in Nassau at that time and that they outnumbered the mere hundred inhabitants in the town.

Richard Noland was an Irish pirate active in the Caribbean. He was best known for sailing with Samuel Bellamy before working for the Spanish.

Paulsgrave Williams was a pirate who sailed the Caribbean, American eastern seaboard, and off West Africa. He is best known for sailing alongside Samuel Bellamy.

References

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