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June 5 is the 156th day of the year(157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar.There are 209 days remaining until the end of the year.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

Contents

Events

AD 70 (LXX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Vespasian and Titus. The denomination AD 70 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Titus Emperor of Ancient Rome

Titus was Roman emperor from 79 to 81. A member of the Flavian dynasty, Titus succeeded his father Vespasian upon his death, thus becoming the first Roman emperor to come to the throne after his own biological father.

Roman Empire Period of Imperial Rome following the Roman Republic (27 BC–476 AD)

The Roman Empire was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization. Ruled by emperors, it had large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, and the Caucasus. From the constitutional reforms of Augustus to the military anarchy of the third century, the Empire was a principate ruled from the city of Rome. The Roman Empire was then ruled by multiple emperors and divided in a Western Roman Empire, based in Milan and later Ravenna, and an Eastern Roman Empire, based in Nicomedia and later Constantinople. Rome remained the nominal capital of both parts until 476 AD, when Odoacer deposed Romulus Augustus after capturing Ravenna and the Roman Senate sent the imperial regalia to Constantinople. The fall of the Western Roman Empire to barbarian kings, along with the hellenization of the Eastern Roman Empire into the Byzantine Empire, is conventionally used to mark the end of Ancient Rome and the beginning of the Middle Ages.

Births

Year 1341 (MCCCXLI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York 14th-century English prince and nobleman

Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, KG was the fourth surviving son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. Like many medieval English princes, Edmund gained his nickname from his birthplace: Kings Langley Palace in Hertfordshire. He was the founder of the House of York, but it was through the marriage of his younger son, Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge, to Anne de Mortimer, great-granddaughter of Edmund's elder brother Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, that the House of York made its claim to the English throne in the Wars of the Roses. The other party in the Wars of the Roses, the incumbent House of Lancaster, was formed from descendants of Edmund's elder brother John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, Edward III's third son.

Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports ceremonial official in the United Kingdom

The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports is a ceremonial official in the United Kingdom. The post dates from at least the 12th century, when the title was Keeper of the Coast, but may be older. The Lord Warden was originally in charge of the Cinque Ports, a group of five port towns on the southeast coast of England that were formed to collectively supply ships for The Crown in the absence at the time of a formal navy. Today the role is a sinecure and an honorary title, and 14 towns belong to the Cinque Ports confederation. The title is one of the higher honours bestowed by the Sovereign; it has often been held by members of the Royal Family or Prime Ministers, especially those who have been influential in defending Britain at times of war.

Deaths

301 Year

Year 301 (CCCI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Postumius and Nepotianus. The denomination 301 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Sima Lun, courtesy name Ziyi (子彛), was titled the Prince of Zhao and the usurper of the Jin Dynasty from February 3 to May 30, 301. He is usually not counted in the list of Jin emperors due to his brief reign, and was often mentioned by historians as an example of a wicked usurper. He was the third of the eight princes commonly associated with the War of the Eight Princes.

535 Year

Year 535 (DXXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Belisarius without colleague. The denomination 535 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Holidays and observances

Saint Boniface 8th-century Anglo-Saxon missionary and saint

Saint Boniface, born Winfrid in the Devon town of Crediton, England, was a leading figure in the Anglo-Saxon mission to the Germanic parts of the Frankish Empire during the 8th century. He organised significant foundations of the Catholic Church in Germany and was made archbishop of Mainz by Pope Gregory III. He was martyred in Frisia in 754, along with 52 others, and his remains were returned to Fulda, where they rest in a sarcophagus which became a site of pilgrimage. Boniface's life and death as well as his work became widely known, there being a wealth of material available—a number of vitae, especially the near-contemporary Vita Bonifatii auctore Willibaldi, legal documents, possibly some sermons, and above all his correspondence. He became the patron saint of Germania, known as the "Apostle of the Germans".

Dorotheus of Tyre Syrian saint

Saint Dorotheus bishop of Tyre is traditionally credited with an Acts of the Seventy Apostles, who were sent out according to the Gospel of Luke 10:1.

Genesius, Count of Clermont was a noble of Gaul and reputed miracle worker. He was said to be count of Clermont

Related Research Articles

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April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 262 days remaining until the end of the year.

April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 266 days remaining until the end of the year.

April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 268 days remaining until the end of the year.

July 10 is the 191st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 174 days remaining until the end of the year.

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 193 days remaining until the end of the year.

January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 354 days remaining until the end of the year.

January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 348 days remaining until the end of the year.

July 27 is the 208th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 157 days remaining until the end of the year.

May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 231 days remaining until the end of the year.

March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 301 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 22 is the 326th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 39 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 10 is the 283rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 82 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 31 is the 304th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 61 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 87 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 108 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 5 is the 248th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 117 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 13 is the 256th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 109 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 15 is the 258th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 107 days remaining until the end of the year.

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References

  1. Christopher Lloyd, The Navy and the Slave Trade: The Suppression of the African Slave Trade in the Nineteenth Century, 1968, pp 264-268
  2. "MORE THAN 100 DIED IN VOLGA BOAT CRASH, SOVIET OFFICIAL SAYS". The New York Times. 1983-06-08. Retrieved 2018-11-29.
  3. William K. Stevens (June 1984). "PUNJAB RAID: UNANSWERED QUESTIONS". New York Times. Retrieved 4 June 2018.
  4. Hughes, Quentin; Thake, Conrad (2005). Malta, War & Peace: An Architectural Chronicle 1800–2000. Midsea Books Ltd. p. 250. ISBN   9789993270553.
  5. "Kate Spade: Fashion designer found dead in New York home". BBC News. June 5, 2018. Retrieved June 5, 2018.