February 8

Last updated

01 02
03 04 05 06 07 08 09
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28
   2019 (Friday)
   2018 (Thursday)
   2017 (Wednesday)
   2016 (Monday)
   2015 (Sunday)
   2014 (Saturday)
   2013 (Friday)
   2012 (Wednesday)
   2011 (Tuesday)
   2010 (Monday)

February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar.There are 326 days remaining until the end of the year(327 in leap years).

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

Contents

Events

421 Year

Year 421 (CDXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Agricola and Eustathius. The denomination 421 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Constantius III Western Roman Emperor

Constantius III, was Western Roman Emperor in 421, from 8 February 421 to 2 September 421. He earned his position as Emperor due to his capability as a general under Honorius, achieving the rank of Magister militum by 411. That same year, he was sent to suppress the revolt of Constantine III, a Roman general who declared himself emperor. Constantius led his army to Arles in Gaul, the capital of Constantine III, and defeated Gerontius, a general rebelling against Constantine, before himself besieging Arles. After defeating a relief force led by Edobichus, Constantius convinced Constantine to surrender, promising safe retirement, but betrayed and beheaded him as soon as he surrendered. Constantius then went on to lead campaigns against various barbarian groups in Hispania and Gaul, recovering much of both for the Western Roman Empire. Constantius was proclaimed Western Roman Emperor by Honorius on 8 February 421. He reigned for seven months before dying on 2 September 421.

Western Roman Empire Independently administered western provinces of the Roman Empire

In historiography, the Western Roman Empire refers to the western provinces of the Roman Empire at any time during which they were administered by a separate independent Imperial court; in particular, this term is used to describe the period from 395 to 476, where there were separate coequal courts dividing the governance of the empire in the Western and the Eastern provinces, with a distinct imperial succession in the separate courts. The terms Western Roman Empire and Eastern Roman Empire are modern descriptions that describe political entities that were de facto independent; contemporary Romans did not consider the Empire to have been split into two separate empires but viewed it as a single polity governed by two separate imperial courts as an administrative expediency. The Western Roman Empire collapsed in 476, and the Western imperial court was formally dissolved in 480. The Eastern imperial court survived until 1453.

Births

Year 120 (CXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Severus and Fulvus. The denomination 120 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Vettius Valens was a 2nd-century Hellenistic astrologer, a somewhat younger contemporary of Claudius Ptolemy.

412 Year

Year 412 (CDXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Honorius and Theodosius. The denomination 412 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Deaths

Year 538 (DXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Iohannes without colleague. The denomination 538 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Severus of Antioch Patriarch of Antioch

Saint Severus the Great of Antioch, also known as Severus of Gaza, was the Patriarch of Antioch, and head of the Syriac Orthodox Church, from 512 until his death in 538. He is venerated as a saint in the Oriental Orthodox Church, and his feast day is 8 February.

Patriarch of Antioch is a traditional title held by the Bishop of Antioch As the traditional "overseer" of the first gentile Christian community, the position has been of prime importance in the church from its earliest period. This diocese is one of the few for which the names of its bishops from the apostolic beginnings have been preserved. Today five churches use the title of Patriarch of Antioch: the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch, the Syriac Catholic Church, the Melkite Greek Catholic Church, and the Maronite Church. Historically, there has also been a Latin Patriarch of Antioch.

Holidays and observances

Cuthmann of Steyning Anglo-Saxon hermit

Saint Cuthmann of Steyning, also spelt Cuthman, was an Anglo-Saxon hermit and church-builder.

Ælfflæd of Whitby Abbess of Whitby

Saint Ælfflæd (654–714) was the daughter of King Oswiu of Northumbria and Eanflæd. She was abbess of Whitby Abbey, an abbey of nuns that were known for their skills in medicine, from the death of her kinswoman Hilda in 680, first jointly with her mother, then alone. Ælfflæd was particularly known for her skills in surgery and her personal attention to patients, as was Hilda, who was known for her personalized medical care.

Gerolamo Emiliani Italian humanitarian

Gerolamo Emiliani, was an Italian humanitarian, founder of the Somaschi Fathers, and saint. He was canonized in 1767 and is the patron saint of orphans.

Related Research Articles

April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 269 days remaining until the end of the year.

April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 259 days remaining until the end of the year.

April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 262 days remaining until the end of the year.

December 10 is the 344th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 21 days remaining until the end of the year.

June 24 is the 175th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 190 days remaining until the end of the year.

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 193 days remaining until the end of the year.

January 6 is the sixth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 359 days remaining until the end of the year.

January 8 is the eighth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 357 days remaining until the end of the year.

March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 282 days remaining until the end of the year.

March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 275 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 19 is the 323rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 42 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 10 is the 314th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 51 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 17 is the 321st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 44 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 20 is the 293rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 72 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 87 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 15 is the 288th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 77 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 108 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 5 is the 248th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 117 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 15 is the 258th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 107 days remaining until the end of the year.

April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 271 days remaining until the end of the year.

References

  1. Salis (1867). The Coins of the Two Eudoxias,Eudocia,Placidia, and Honoria and of Theodosius II,Marcian, and Leo I, Struck in Italy. p. 3.
  2. Clifford J. Rogers (2010). The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology. Oxford University Press. p. 567. ISBN   978-0-19-533403-6.
  3. Manfred Horstmanshoff (25 October 2010). Hippocrates and Medical Education: Selected Papers Presented at the XIIth International Hippocrates Colloquium, Universiteit Leiden, 24-26 August 2005. BRILL. p. 11. ISBN   978-90-474-2595-3.
  4. Chris Brennan (10 February 2017). Hellenistic Astrology: The Study of Fate and Fortune. Amor Fati Publications. pp. 106–. ISBN   978-0-9985889-0-2.
  5. Rudolphus Maria Berg (1 January 2001). Proclus' Hymns: Essays, Translations, Commentary. BRILL. pp. 3–. ISBN   90-04-12236-2.
  6. Jere L. Bacharach (2006). Islamic History Through Coins: An Analysis and Catalogue of Tenth-century Ikhshidid Coinage. American Univ in Cairo Press. pp. 21–. ISBN   978-977-424-930-3.
  7. Joseph L. Wieczynski (1994). The Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet History. Academic International Press. ISBN   978-0-87569-064-3.
  8. E. Michael Gerli (4 December 2013). Medieval Iberia: An Encyclopedia. Routledge. pp. 36–. ISBN   978-1-136-77162-0.
  9. Encyclopedia of World Biography. Gale Research. 1998. ISBN   978-0-7876-2544-3.
  10. Peter G. Bietenholz; Thomas Brian Deutscher (2003). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. University of Toronto Press. p. 2. ISBN   978-0-8020-8577-1.
  11. Titian; Susanna Biadene; Mary Yakush (1990). Titian: prince of painters. Prestel.
  12. John Flower (17 January 2013). Historical Dictionary of French Literature. Scarecrow Press. pp. 42–. ISBN   978-0-8108-7945-4.
  13. "Burton, Robert". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography . Retrieved 12 October 2018.
  14. National Gallery of Ireland (1867). Catalogue, Descriptive and Historical, of the Works of Art in the National Gallery of Ireland: With Biographical Notices of the Masters. Alex. Thom. p. 35.
  15. Joseph Haydn; Benjamin Vincent (1868). Specimen Pages, Prospectus, & Opinions of Haydn's Dictionary of Dates: Comprehending Remarkable Occurrences, Ancient and Modern, the Foundation, Laws, and Governments of Countries; Their Progress in Arts, Science and Literature, Their Achievements in Arms; and Their Civil, Military, Religious and Philanthropic Institutions, and Particularly of the British Empire. E. Moxon. p. 247.
  16. Gilbert Faccarello; Heinz D. Kurz (27 July 2016). Handbook on the History of Economic Analysis Volume I: Great Economists Since Petty and Boisguilbert. Edward Elgar Publishing. p. 40. ISBN   978-1-78536-664-2.
  17. Randel Don (1996). The Harvard Biographical Dictionary of Music. Harvard University Press. p. 332. ISBN   978-0-674-37299-3.
  18. Alison Latham (2004). The Oxford Dictionary of Musical Works. Oxford University Press. p. 195. ISBN   978-0-19-861020-5.
  19. Arnold McNaughton (1973). The book of kings: a royal genealogy. Garnstone Press. ISBN   978-0-900391-19-4.
  20. Joseph Haydn (1869). Haydn's Universal Index of Biography from the Creation to the Present Time: For the Use of the Statesman, the Historian, and the Journalist. E. Moxon, son, and Company. pp. 242–.
  21. Donald C. Pfanz (9 November 2000). Richard S. Ewell: A Soldier's Life. Univ of North Carolina Press. pp. 5–. ISBN   978-0-8078-8852-0.
  22. Rachel Dickinson (2009). John Ruskin's Correspondence with Joan Severn: Sense and Nonsense Letters. MHRA. pp. 283–. ISBN   978-1-905981-90-8.
  23. Robert P. Broadwater (25 April 2013). William T. Sherman: A Biography. ABC-CLIO. pp. 1–. ISBN   978-1-4408-0061-0.
  24. Eric Le Calvez (2004). Gustave Flaubert: A Documentary Volume. Gale. ISBN   978-0-7876-6838-9.
  25. Harold Philip Moon (January 1976). Henry Walter Bates FRS, 1825-1892: explorer, scientist, and Darwinian. Leicestershire Museums, Art Galleries, and Records Service.
  26. Jules Verne (17 November 2014). The Exploration Of The World: eBook Edition. Jazzybee Verlag. pp. 4–. ISBN   978-3-8496-4648-6.
  27. Robert Elsie (2010). Historical Dictionary of Albania. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 195–. ISBN   978-0-8108-6188-6.
  28. Anne Commire (12 December 2000). Women in World History. Gale. ISBN   978-0-7876-4069-9.
  29. "Cliff Allison". The Independent. 9 April 2005. Retrieved 12 October 2010.
  30. Lindsey C. Harnsberger (October 1996). Essential Dictionary of Music: Definitions, Composers, Theory, Instrument & Vocal Ranges. Alfred Music Publishing. pp. 238–. ISBN   978-0-88284-728-3.
  31. Rédaction, La (2015-04-06). "Samedi dernier au Sacré-Cœur de la Gombe: Pensée pieuse en mémoire de Marcel Lihau et Sophie Kanza". Groupe de Presse l'Avenir (in French). Retrieved 2018-08-21.
  32. "Jim 'The Anvil' Neidhart dies". canoe.com. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  33. "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 29 April 2018.
  34. "Kirk Muller's Biography". Personal website. Retrieved 12 October 2018.
  35. Russell, Mallory (February 27, 2012). "Meet Progressive's Flo: Standup Comic Stephanie Courtney". Business Insider. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  36. Beanz Smalls, Bernard. "FLY Interviews: Get Familiar With Star of NBC's New Comedy The Good Place!". Stuff Fly People Like. Retrieved February 4, 2019. Establishes birth date as February 8.
  37. Léon, Felice (January 22, 2019). "An Unexpected Adonis: Actor William Jackson Harper Has Found His 'Good Place'". The Root . Establishes age as 38 in January 2019, making his birth year 1980.
  38. Soloski, Alexis (September 14, 2018). "Why William Jackson Harper of 'The Good Place' Can't Quit the Theater". The New York Times . Establishes age as 38 in September 2018, making his birth year 1980.
  39. "エビ中・松野莉奈さん、18歳で急死 7日のコンサートを体調不良で休む". Sanspo.com (in Japanese). Sankei Digital. 8 Feb 2017. Retrieved 9 Feb 2017.
    "松野莉奈、鈴木裕乃、柏木ひなた主演短編映画、YouTubeで1日限定公開". Cinra.net. 2018-02-08.