August 13

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August 13 is the 225th day of the year(226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar.There are 140 days remaining until the end of the year.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used civil calendar in the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

Contents

Events

Year 29 BC was either a common year starting on Friday or Saturday or a leap year starting on Thursday, Friday or Saturday of the Julian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Proleptic Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Octavian and Appuleius. The denomination 29 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Roman triumph

The Roman triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome, held to publicly celebrate and sanctify the success of a military commander who had led Roman forces to victory in the service of the state or, originally and traditionally, one who had successfully completed a foreign war.

Ancient Rome History of Rome from the 8th-century BC to the 5th-century

In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire until the fall of the western empire. The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed. The Roman empire expanded to become one of the largest empires in the ancient world, though still ruled from the city, with an estimated 50 to 90 million inhabitants and covering 5.0 million square kilometres at its height in AD 117.

Births

985 Year

Year 985 (CMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah caliph

Abū ʿAlī Manṣūr, better known by his regnal title al-Ḥākim bi-Amr Allāh, was the sixth Fatimid caliph and 16th Ismaili imam (996–1021). Al-Hakim is an important figure in a number of Shia Ismaili religions, such as the world's 15 million Nizaris, in addition to the 2 million Druze of the Levant whose eponymous founder ad-Darazi proclaimed him as the incarnation of God in 1018.

Year 1311 (MCCCXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

587 Year

Year 587 (DLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 587 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Radegund Frankish queen consort

Radegund was a Thuringian princess and Frankish queen, who founded the Abbey of the Holy Cross at Poitiers. She is the patron saint of several churches in France and England and of Jesus College, Cambridge.

604 Year

Year 604 (DCIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 604 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Holidays and observances

Calendar of saints Christian liturgical calendar celebrating saints

The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".

Benedetto Sinigardi

Benedetto Sinigardi, also known as Fra Benedetto di Arezzo or Sinigardi di Arezzo was a Franciscan friar, and is considered to be the author of the Angelus prayer.

Benildus Romançon Christian Brother, educator and saint

Benildus Romançon, F.S.C., was a French schoolteacher and member of the Brothers of the Christian Schools who has been declared a saint by the Catholic Church. His feast day is August 13.

Related Research Articles

August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 152 days remaining until the end of the year.

August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 145 days remaining until the end of the year.

April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 259 days remaining until the end of the year.

August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 139 days remaining until the end of the year.

August 10 is the 222nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 143 days remaining until the end of the year.

April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 250 days remaining until the end of the year.

December 25 is the 359th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are six days remaining until the end of the year.

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 193 days remaining until the end of the year.

May 27 is the 147th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 218 days remaining until the end of the year.

March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 288 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 19 is the 323rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 42 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 3 is the 307th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 58 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 6 is the 279th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 86 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 18 is the 291st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 74 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 23 is the 296th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 69 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 21 is the 264th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 101 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 5 is the 248th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 117 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 25 is the 268th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 97 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 9 is the 252nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 113 days remaining until the end of the year.

August 20 is the 232nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 133 days remaining until the end of the year.

References

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