May 18

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May 18 is the 138th day of the year(139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 227 days remain until the end of the year.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

Contents

Events

Year 332 (CCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Pacatianus and Hilarianus. The denomination 332 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Constantine the Great Roman emperor

Constantine the Great, also known as Constantine I, was a Roman Emperor who ruled between 306 and 337 AD. Born in Naissus, in Dacia Ripensis, city now known as Niš, he was the son of Flavius Valerius Constantius, a Roman Army officer of Illyrian origins. His mother Helena was Greek. His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west, in 293 AD. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under Emperors Diocletian and Galerius. In 305, Constantius was raised to the rank of Augustus, senior western emperor, and Constantine was recalled west to campaign under his father in Britannia (Britain). Constantine was acclaimed as emperor by the army at Eboracum after his father's death in 306 AD. He emerged victorious in a series of civil wars against Emperors Maxentius and Licinius to become sole ruler of both west and east by 324 AD.

Constantinople capital city of the Eastern Roman or Byzantine Empire, the Latin and the Ottoman Empire

Constantinople was the capital city of the Roman Empire (330–395), of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, of the brief Crusader state known as the Latin Empire (1204–1261) and of the Ottoman Empire (1453–1923). In 1923 the capital of Turkey, the successor state of the Ottoman Empire, was moved to Ankara and the name Constantinople was officially changed to Istanbul. The city is located in what is now the European side and the core of modern Istanbul. The city is still referred to as Constantinople in Greek-speaking sources.

Births

1048 Year

Year 1048 (MXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1186 (MCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Konstantin of Rostov Russian prince

Konstantin Vsevolodovich was the eldest son of Vsevolod the Big Nest and Maria Shvarnovna.

Deaths

526 Year

Year 526 (DXXVI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Olybrius without colleague. The denomination 526 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Pope John I pope

Pope John I was Pope from 13 August 523 to his death in 526. He was a native of Siena, in Italy. He was sent on a diplomatic mission to Constantinople by the Ostrogoth King Theoderic to negotiate better treatment for Arians. Although relatively successful, upon his return to Ravenna, Theoderic had the Pope imprisoned for allegedly conspiring with Constantinople. The frail pope died of neglect and ill-treatment.

893 Year

Year 893 (DCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Holidays and observances

Saint Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury, also known as Saint Elgiva was the first wife of Edmund I, by whom she bore two future kings, Eadwig and Edgar. Like her mother Wynflaed, she had a close and special if unknown connection with the royal nunnery of Shaftesbury (Dorset), founded by King Alfred, where she was buried and soon revered as a saint. According to a pre-Conquest tradition from Winchester, her feast day is 18 May.

Eric IX of Sweden Swedish king in the 12:th century

Eric IX,, also called Eric the Holy, Saint Eric, Eric the Lawgiver, was a Swedish king c. 1156-60. The Roman Martyrology of the Catholic Church names him as a saint memorialized on 18 May. He is the founder of the House of Eric which ruled Sweden with interruptions from c. 1156 to 1250.

Felix of Cantalice Roman Catholic saint

Felix of Cantalice, O.F.M. Cap., was born on 18 May 1515 to peasant parents in Cantalice, Italy, in the central Italian region of Lazio. Canonized by Pope Clement XI in 1712, he was the first Capuchin friar to be named a saint.

Related Research Articles

August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 128 days remain until the end of the year.

December 25 is the 359th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. Six days remain until the end of the year.

July 10 is the 191st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 174 days remain until the end of the year.

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 193 days remain until the end of the year.

July 27 is the 208th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 157 days remain until the end of the year.

November 22 is the 326th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 39 days remain until the end of the year.

November 5 is the 309th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 56 days remain until the end of the year.

November 19 is the 323rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 42 days remain until the end of the year.

November 7 is the 311th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 54 days remain until the end of the year.

November 14 is the 318th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 47 days remain until the end of the year.

November 3 is the 307th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 58 days remain until the end of the year.

October 3 is the 276th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 89 days remain until the end of the year.

October 10 is the 283rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 82 days remain until the end of the year.

October 18 is the 291st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 74 days remain until the end of the year.

October 16 is the 289th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 76 days remain until the end of the year.

September 21 is the 264th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 101 days remain until the end of the year.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 108 days remain until the end of the year.

September 5 is the 248th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 117 days remain until the end of the year.

September 25 is the 268th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 97 days remain until the end of the year.

August 20 is the 232nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 133 days remain until the end of the year.

References

  1. Arnold Hugh Martin Jones (1964). The Later Roman Empire, 284-602: A Social Economic and Administrative Survey. University of Oklahoma Press. p. 84.
  2. Day Otis Kellogg; William Harrison De Puy; William Robertson Smith (1902). The Encyclopaedia Britannica: a dictionary of arts, sciences, and general literature. Werner Co. p. 16.
  3. Abraham David (8 January 2006). A Hebrew Chronicle from Prague, C. 1615. University of Alabama Press. p. 73. ISBN   978-0-8173-5290-5.
  4. Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Tupolev Tu-104B CCCP-42411 Chita". aviation-safety.net. Retrieved 2019-05-16.
  5. https://www.nytimes.com/1977/05/18/archives/likud-asks-for-unity-begin-in-trying-to-assemble-a-majority-in.html
  6. "10 People Killed In Texas High School Shooting; Suspect In Custody". NPR.org. Retrieved 2019-05-16.
  7. "Ruth (Blaney) Alexander Elliott". Clover Field Register. Retrieved 2 August 2019.