1675

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1675 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1675
MDCLXXV
Ab urbe condita 2428
Armenian calendar 1124
ԹՎ ՌՃԻԴ
Assyrian calendar 6425
Balinese saka calendar 1596–1597
Bengali calendar 1082
Berber calendar 2625
English Regnal year 26  Cha. 2   27  Cha. 2
Buddhist calendar 2219
Burmese calendar 1037
Byzantine calendar 7183–7184
Chinese calendar 甲寅(Wood  Tiger)
4371 or 4311
     to 
乙卯年 (Wood  Rabbit)
4372 or 4312
Coptic calendar 1391–1392
Discordian calendar 2841
Ethiopian calendar 1667–1668
Hebrew calendar 5435–5436
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1731–1732
 - Shaka Samvat 1596–1597
 - Kali Yuga 4775–4776
Holocene calendar 11675
Igbo calendar 675–676
Iranian calendar 1053–1054
Islamic calendar 1085–1086
Japanese calendar Enpō 3
(延宝3年)
Javanese calendar 1597–1598
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar 4008
Minguo calendar 237 before ROC
民前237年
Nanakshahi calendar 207
Thai solar calendar 2217–2218
Tibetan calendar 阳木虎年
(male Wood-Tiger)
1801 or 1420 or 648
     to 
阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
1802 or 1421 or 649
King Philip's War Indians Attacking a Garrison House.jpg
King Philip's War

1675 (MDCLXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1675th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 675th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1675, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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Births

Guillaume Delisle Guillaume Deslile AGE 1802.jpg
Guillaume Delisle

Deaths

Gerrit Dou Dou, Gerard - Self-Portrait - c. 1665 no background.png
Gerrit Dou
Guru Tegh Bahadur 18th century painting of Guru teg bahadur.jpg
Guru Tegh Bahadur
Johannes Vermeer Cropped version of Jan Vermeer van Delft 002.jpg
Johannes Vermeer

Related Research Articles

1661 1661

1661 (MDCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1661st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 661st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1661, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1662 1662

1662 (MDCLXII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1662nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 662nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 62nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1662, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1574 1574

Year 1574 (MDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1650 1650

1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1650th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 650th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1650, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1601 1601

1601 (MDCI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1601, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar. This epoch is the beginning of the 400-year Gregorian leap-year cycle within which digital files first existed; the last year of any such cycle is the only leap year whose year number is divisible by 100.

1602 1602

1602 (MDCII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1602, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1550 1550

Year 1550 (MDL) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1592 1592

1592 (MDXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1592, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

The 1670s decade ran from January 1, 1670, to December 31, 1679.

1659 1659

1659 (MDCLIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1659th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 659th year of the 2nd millennium, the 59th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1659, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1660 (MDCLX) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1660th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 660th year of the 2nd millennium, the 60th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1660, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1681 1681

1681 (MDCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1681st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 681st year of the 2nd millennium, the 81st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1681, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1679 1679

1679 (MDCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1679th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 679th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1679, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1676 1676

1676 (MDCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1676th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 676th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1676, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1672 1672

1672 (MDCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1672nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 672nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 72nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1672, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

King Philips War conflict between Native American inhabitants of present-day New England and English colonists

King Philip's War was an armed conflict in 1675–1678 between Indian inhabitants of New England and New England colonists and their Indian allies. The war is named for Metacomet, the Wampanoag chief who adopted the name Philip because of the friendly relations between his father Massasoit and the Mayflower Pilgrims. The war continued in the most northern reaches of New England until the signing of the Treaty of Casco Bay in April 1678.

Wampanoag Native American ethnic group

The Wampanoag, also rendered Wôpanâak, are an American Indian tribe. They were a loose confederation of several tribes in the 17th century, but today Wampanoag people encompass five officially recognized tribes. The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe and the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head in Massachusetts are Federally recognized, and the Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe, Namasket Pokanoket Band, and Pocasset Wampanoag Tribe (Pokonoket) are recognized by the State of Massachusetts. They lived in southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island in the beginning of the 17th century, at the time of first contact with the English colonists, a territory that included the islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket. Their population numbered in the thousands; 3,000 Wampanoag lived on Martha's Vineyard alone.

Narragansett people American Indian tribe from Rhode Island, United States

The Narragansett people are an Algonquian American Indian tribe from Rhode Island. The tribe was nearly landless for most of the 20th century, but it worked to gain federal recognition and attained it in 1983. It is officially the Narragansett Indian Tribe of Rhode Island and is made up of descendants of tribal members who were identified in an 1880 treaty with the state.

John Sassamon also known as Wussausmon, was born c.1620. He became a Christian convert, a praying Indian who helped serve as an interpreter to the colonists.

References

  1. Headland, Robert (1992). The Island of South Georgia (2nd ed.). Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0-521-42474-7.
  2. de Seixas y Lovera, Francisco (1690). Descripcion geographica, y derrotero de la region austral Magallanica. Madrid: Antonio de Zafra.
  3. Wace, N. M. (1969). "The discovery, exploitation and settlement of the Tristan da Cunha Islands". Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society of Australasia (South Australian Branch). 10: 11–40.
  4. "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) p30
  5. de Vea, Antonio (1886). "Expedición de Antonio de Vea". Anuario Hidrográfico de la Marina de Chile (in Spanish). Valparaíso. pp. 539–596.