May 15

Last updated

01 02 03 04
05 06 07 08 09 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31  
   2018 (Tuesday)
   2017 (Monday)
   2016 (Sunday)
   2015 (Friday)
   2014 (Thursday)
   2013 (Wednesday)
   2012 (Tuesday)
   2011 (Sunday)
   2010 (Saturday)
   2009 (Friday)

May 15 is the 135th day of the year(136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar.There are 230 days remaining until the end of the year.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

Contents

Events

Year 495 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Sabinus and Priscus. The denomination 495 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Mercury (mythology) Ancient Roman god of trade, merchants, and travel

Mercury is a major god in Roman religion and mythology, being one of the 12 Dii Consentes within the ancient Roman pantheon. He is the god of financial gain, commerce, eloquence, messages, communication, travelers, boundaries, luck, trickery and thieves; he also serves as the guide of souls to the underworld. He was considered the son of Maia, who was a daughter of the Titan Atlas, and Jupiter in Roman mythology. His name is possibly related to the Latin word merx, mercari, and merces (wages); another possible connection is the Proto-Indo-European root merĝ- for "boundary, border" and Greek οὖρος, as the "keeper of boundaries," referring to his role as bridge between the upper and lower worlds. In his earliest forms, he appears to have been related to the Etruscan deity Turms; both gods share characteristics with the Greek god Hermes. He is often depicted holding the caduceus in his left hand. Similar to his Greek equivalent Hermes, he was awarded the caduceus by Apollo who handed him a magic wand, which later turned into the caduceus.

Ancient Rome History of Rome from the 8th-century BC to the 5th-century

In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman civilization from the founding of the Italian city of Rome in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire until the fall of the western empire. The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian Peninsula, conventionally founded in 753 BC, that grew into the city of Rome and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed. The Roman Empire expanded to become one of the largest empires in the ancient world, though still ruled from the city, with an estimated 50 to 90 million inhabitants and covering 5.0 million square kilometres at its height in AD 117.

The National Assembly in France votes to give full French citizenship to Free people of color.

Free people of color persons of partial African and European descent who were not enslaved

In the context of the history of slavery in the Americas, free people of color were people of mixed African and European descent who were not enslaved. The term arose in the French colonies, including La Louisiane and settlements on Caribbean islands, such as Saint-Domingue (Haiti), Guadeloupe, and Martinique, where a distinct group of free people of color developed. Freed African slaves were included in the term affranchis, but historically they were considered as distinct from the free people of color. In these territories and major cities, particularly New Orleans, and those cities held by the Spanish, a substantial third class of primarily mixed-race, free people developed. These colonial societies classified mixed-race people in a variety of ways, generally related to visible features and to the proportion of African ancestry. Racial classifications were numerous in Latin America.

1792 Year

1792 (MDCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1792nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 792nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1790s decade. As of the start of 1792, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

War of the First Coalition 1790s war to contain Revolutionary France

The War of the First Coalition is the traditional name of the wars that several European powers fought between 1792 and 1797 against the French First Republic. Despite the collective strength of these nations compared with France, they were not really allied and fought without much apparent coordination or agreement. Each power had its eye on a different part of France it wanted to appropriate after a French defeat, which never occurred.

Kingdom of Sardinia former Italian state (1324–1861)

The Kingdom of Sardinia was a state in Southern Europe from the early 14th until the mid-19th century.

Births

Year 1397 (MCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Sejong the Great Fourth king of Joseon

Sejong the Great was the fourth king of the Joseon dynasty of Korea. He was the third son of King Taejong and Queen consort Min. He was designated as heir-apparent, Crown Prince, after his older brother Prince Yangnyeong was stripped of his title. He ascended to the throne in 1418. During the first four years of his reign, Taejong governed as regent, after which his father-in-law, Sim On, and his close associates were executed.

1531 Year

Year 1531 (MDXXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Year 392 (CCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Augustus and Rufinus. The denomination 392 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Valentinian II Roman Emperor

Valentinian II, was Roman Emperor from AD 375 to 392.

558 Year

Year 558 (DLVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 558 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Holidays and observances

Related Research Articles

August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 152 days remain until the end of the year.

August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 139 days remain until the end of the year.

April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 265 days remain until the end of the year.

April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 268 days remain until the end of the year.

December 9 is the 343rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 22 days remain until the end of the year.

February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 328 days remain until the end of the year.

July 27 is the 208th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 157 days remain until the end of the year.

January 6 is the sixth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 359 days remain until the end of the year.

May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 232 days remain until the end of the year.

November 5 is the 309th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 56 days remain until the end of the year.

November 30 is the 334th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 31 days remain until the end of the year.

November 3 is the 307th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 58 days remain until the end of the year.

November 17 is the 321st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 44 days remain until the end of the year.

October 10 is the 283rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 82 days remain until the end of the year.

October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 87 days remain until the end of the year.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 108 days remain until the end of the year.

September 5 is the 248th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 117 days remain until the end of the year.

September 9 is the 252nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 113 days remain until the end of the year.

August 20 is the 232nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 133 days remain until the end of the year.

April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 271 days remain until the end of the year.

References

  1. Pierre Claude François Daunou (1838). The Power of the Popes: Or, an Historical Essay on Their Temporal Dominion, the Abuse of Their Spiritual Authority, and the Wars They Have Declared Against Sovereigns; Containing Very Extraordinary Documents of the Roman Court Before Published. Tims. pp. 377–.
  2. Notable women in mathematics : a biographical dictionary. Morrow, Charlene, 1948-, Perl, Teri. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press. 1998. ISBN   9780313291319. OCLC   36768082.