1174

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1174 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1174
MCLXXIV
Ab urbe condita 1927
Armenian calendar 623
ԹՎ ՈԻԳ
Assyrian calendar 5924
Balinese saka calendar 1095–1096
Bengali calendar 581
Berber calendar 2124
English Regnal year 20  Hen. 2   21  Hen. 2
Buddhist calendar 1718
Burmese calendar 536
Byzantine calendar 6682–6683
Chinese calendar 癸巳(Water  Snake)
3870 or 3810
     to 
甲午年 (Wood  Horse)
3871 or 3811
Coptic calendar 890–891
Discordian calendar 2340
Ethiopian calendar 1166–1167
Hebrew calendar 4934–4935
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1230–1231
 - Shaka Samvat 1095–1096
 - Kali Yuga 4274–4275
Holocene calendar 11174
Igbo calendar 174–175
Iranian calendar 552–553
Islamic calendar 569–570
Japanese calendar Jōan 4
(承安4年)
Javanese calendar 1081–1082
Julian calendar 1174
MCLXXIV
Korean calendar 3507
Minguo calendar 738 before ROC
民前738年
Nanakshahi calendar −294
Seleucid era 1485/1486 AG
Thai solar calendar 1716–1717
Tibetan calendar 阴水蛇年
(female Water-Snake)
1300 or 919 or 147
     to 
阳木马年
(male Wood-Horse)
1301 or 920 or 148

Year 1174 ( MCLXXIV ) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Tuesday is any non-leap year that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is F. The current year, 2019, is a common year starting on Tuesday in the Gregorian calendar. The last such year was 2013 and the next such year will be 2030, or, likewise, 2014 and 2025 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Leap years starting on Monday share this characteristic. From July of the year that precedes this year until September in this type of year is the longest period that occurs without a Friday the 13th. Leap years starting on Saturday share this characteristic, from August of the common year that precedes it to October in that type of year.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Africa

Alexandria Metropolis in Egypt

Alexandria is the second-largest city in Egypt and a major economic centre, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in the north central part of the country. Its low elevation on the Nile delta makes it highly vulnerable to rising sea levels. Alexandria is an important industrial center because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez. Alexandria is also a popular tourist destination.

Europe

April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 268 days remaining until the end of the year.

Richard of Dover 12th-century Archbishop of Canterbury

Richard was a medieval Benedictine monk and Archbishop of Canterbury. Employed by Thomas Becket immediately before Becket's death, Richard arranged for Becket to be buried in Canterbury Cathedral and eventually succeeded Becket at Canterbury in a contentious election. Much of Richard's time as archbishop was spent in a dispute with Roger de Pont L'Evêque, the Archbishop of York over the primacy of England, and with St Augustine's Abbey in Canterbury over the archbishop's jurisdiction over the abbey. Richard had better relations with King Henry II of England than Becket had, and was employed by the king on diplomatic affairs. Richard also had the trust of the papacy, and served as a judge for the papacy. Several of his questions to Pope Alexander III were collected into the Decretals, a collection of ecclesiastical laws, and his patronage of canon lawyers did much to advance the study of canon law in England.

Archbishop of Canterbury senior bishop of the Church of England

The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England, the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury. The current archbishop is Justin Welby, who was enthroned at Canterbury Cathedral on 21 March 2013. Welby is the 105th in a line which goes back more than 1400 years to Augustine of Canterbury, the "Apostle to the English", sent from Rome in the year 597. Welby succeeded Rowan Williams.

Asia

Vietnam Country in Southeast Asia

Vietnam, officially the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, is the easternmost country on the Indochina Peninsula. With an estimated 94.6 million inhabitants as of 2016, it is the 15th most populous country in the world. Vietnam is bordered by China to the north, Laos and Cambodia to the west, part of Thailand to the southwest, and the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia across the South China Sea to the east and southeast. Its capital city has been Hanoi since the reunification of North and South Vietnam in 1976, while its most populous city is Ho Chi Minh City.

China State in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

Western Asia

July 11 is the 192nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 173 days remaining until the end of the year.

Baldwin IV of Jerusalem King of Jerusalem

Baldwin IV, called the Leper, or The Leper King, reigned as King of Jerusalem from 1174 until his death. He was the son of Amalric I of Jerusalem and his first wife, Agnes of Courtenay.

William of Tyre 12th-century clergyman, writer, and Archbishop of Tyre

William of Tyre was a medieval prelate and chronicler. As archbishop of Tyre, he is sometimes known as William II to distinguish him from his predecessor, William I, the Englishman and former Prior of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, who was Archbishop of Tyre from 1127 to 1135. He grew up in Jerusalem at the height of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, which had been established in 1099 after the First Crusade, and he spent twenty years studying the liberal arts and canon law in the universities of Europe.

Central America

  • The last Toltec king commits suicide.

Births

Year 1243 (MCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1204 (MCCIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Saint Sava First Archbishop of Serbs

Saint Sava, known as The Enlightener, was a Serbian prince and Orthodox monk, the first Archbishop of the autocephalous Serbian Church, the founder of Serbian law, and a diplomat. Sava, born as Rastko, was the youngest son of Serbian Grand Prince Stefan Nemanja, and ruled the appanage of Hum briefly in 1190–92. He then left for Mount Athos where he became a monk, with the name Sava (Sabbas). At Athos, he established the monastery of Hilandar, which became one of the most important cultural and religious centres of the Serbian people. In 1219 he was recognized as the first Serbian Archbishop by the Patriarchate exiled in Nicea, and in the same year he authored the oldest known constitution of Serbia, Zakonopravilo, thus securing full independence; both religious and political. Sava is regarded the founder of Serbian medieval literature.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

12th century Century

The 12th century is the period from 1101 to 1200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Common Era. In the history of European culture, this period is considered part of the High Middle Ages and is sometimes called the Age of the Cistercians. In Song dynasty China an invasion by Jurchens caused a political schism of north and south. The Khmer Empire of Cambodia flourished during this century, while the Fatimids of Egypt were overtaken by the Ayyubid dynasty.

The 1160s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1160, and ended on December 31, 1169.

The 1090s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1090, and ended on December 31, 1099.

The 1070s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1070, and ended on December 31, 1079.

The 1170s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1170, and ended on December 31, 1179.

Year 1143 (MCXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

The 1130s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1130, and ended on December 31, 1139.

Year 1173 (MCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1018 Year

Year 1018 (MXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1153 (MCLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1340 (MCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1217 (MCCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1194 (MCXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

The Revolt of 1173–74 was a rebellion against King Henry II of England by three of his sons, his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine, and their rebel supporters. The revolt ended in failure after eighteen months; Henry's rebellious family members had to resign themselves to his continuing rule and were reconciled to him.

Bowes Castle

Bowes Castle is a medieval castle in the village of Bowes in County Durham, England. Built within the perimeter of the former Roman fort of Lavatrae, on the Roman road that is now the A66, the early timber castle on the site was replaced by a more substantial stone structure between 1170 and 1174 on the orders of Henry II. A planned village was built alongside the castle. Bowes Castle withstood Scottish attack during the Great Revolt of 1173–74 but was successfully looted by rebels in 1322. The castle went into decline and was largely dismantled after the English Civil War. The ruins are now owned by English Heritage and run as a tourist attraction. There is free admission during daylight hours.

The Battle of Alnwick (1174) is one of two battles fought near the town of Alnwick, in Northumberland, England. In the battle, which occurred on 13 July 1174, William I of Scotland, also known as William the Lion, was captured by a small English force led by Ranulf de Glanvill.

Events from the 1170s in England.

Events from the 1130s in England.

Humphrey III de Bohun was an Anglo-Norman nobleman and general who served Henry II as Constable. He was the son of Humphrey II de Bohun and Margaret of Hereford, the eldest daughter of the erstwhile constable Miles of Gloucester. He had succeeded to his father's fiefs, centred in Gloucestershire on Caldicot Castle, and in Wiltshire on Trowbridge Castle, by 29 September 1165, when he owed three hundred marks as relief. From 1166 onwards, he held his mother's inheritance, both her Bohun lands in Wiltshire and her inheritance from her late father and brothers.

Adam de Port was an Anglo-Norman nobleman and Baron of Kington.

References

  1. Abels, Richard Philip; Bernard S. Bachrach (2001). The Normans and their adversaries at war. Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer. p. 100. ISBN   0-85115-847-1.
  2. 1 2 Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 69–72. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.
  3. Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 126–127. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.