13th century

Last updated
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Timelines:
State leaders:
Decades:
Categories: BirthsDeaths
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
World Map (except the Americas) circa 1200 A.D. East-Hem 1200ad.jpg
World Map (except the Americas) circa 1200 A.D.

The 13th century was the century which lasted from January 1, 1201 through December 31, 1300 in accordance with the Julian calendar. After its conquests in Asia the Mongol Empire stretched from Eastern Asia to Eastern Europe, while the Muslim Delhi Sultanate conquered large parts of the Indian subcontinent. In the history of European culture, this period is considered part of the High Middle Ages.

Contents

Events

Mongol Empire in 1227 at Genghis Khan' death Genghis Khan empire-en.svg
Mongol Empire in 1227 at Genghis Khan' death
Thomas Aquinas, recognised as the most influential Western medieval legal scholar and theologian. Carlo Crivelli 007.jpg
Thomas Aquinas, recognised as the most influential Western medieval legal scholar and theologian.
A page of the Italian Fibonacci's Liber Abaci from the Biblioteca Nazionale di Firenze showing the Fibonacci sequence with the position in the sequence labeled in Roman numerals and the value in Arabic-Hindu numerals. Liber abbaci magliab f124r.jpg
A page of the Italian Fibonacci's Liber Abaci from the Biblioteca Nazionale di Firenze showing the Fibonacci sequence with the position in the sequence labeled in Roman numerals and the value in Arabic-Hindu numerals.

1200s

1210s

1220s

1230s

1240s

1250s

Alai Gate and Qutub Minar were built during the Mamluk and Khalji dynasties of the Delhi Sultanate. Alai Gate and Qutub Minar.jpg
Alai Gate and Qutub Minar were built during the Mamluk and Khalji dynasties of the Delhi Sultanate.

1260s

Portrait of the Chinese Zen Buddhist Wuzhun Shifan, painted in 1238, Song dynasty. Chinesischer Maler von 1238 001.jpg
Portrait of the Chinese Zen Buddhist Wuzhun Shifan, painted in 1238, Song dynasty.
Hommage of Edward I (kneeling), to the Philippe le Bel (seated). As duke of Aquitaine, Edward was a vassal to the French king. Hommage of Edward I to Philippe le Bel.jpg
Hommage of Edward I (kneeling), to the Philippe le Bel (seated). As duke of Aquitaine, Edward was a vassal to the French king.

1270s

1280s

1290s

Significant people

Frescoes from the 13th-century Boyana Church Kalojan desislava.jpg
Frescoes from the 13th-century Boyana Church
Queen Tamar Vepkhistkaosani zichy.jpg
Queen Tamar
Persian Islamic scholar Mawlana Kwaja Moinuddin Chishti Bichitr. Shaykh Mu'in al-Din Chishti Holding a Globe, detail of miniature from Minto Album, c. 1610-18, India, Chester Beatty Library, Dublin.jpg
Persian Islamic scholar Mawlana Kwaja Moinuddin Chishti

Inventions, discoveries, introductions

See also

Related Research Articles

14th century Century

As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was a century lasting from January 1, 1301, to December 31, 1400. It is estimated that the century witnessed the death of more than 45 million lives. During this period, political and natural disasters were observed in both Europe and the Mongol Empire, but the Islamic world's West Africa and Indian Subcontinent witnessed the rise of economic growth and prosperity.

12th century Century

The 12th century is the period from 1101 to 1200 in accordance with the Julian calendar. In the history of European culture, this period is considered part of the High Middle Ages and is sometimes called the Age of the Cistercians. In Song dynasty China an invasion by Jurchens caused a political schism of north and south. The Khmer Empire of Cambodia flourished during this century, while the Fatimids of Egypt were overtaken by the Ayyubid dynasty. Following the expansions of the Ghaznavids and Ghurid Empire, the Muslim conquests in the Indian subcontinent take place in the end of the century.

Year 1277 (MCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

The 1260s is the decade starting January 1, 1260 and ending December 31, 1269.

The 1270s is the decade starting January 1, 1270, and ending December 31, 1279.

The 1280s is the decade starting January 1, 1280 and ending December 31, 1289.

1260 1260

Year 1260 (MCCLX) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Mongol Empire former country in Asia and Europe

The Mongol Empire existed during the 13th and 14th centuries, and was the largest contiguous land empire in history. Originating in Mongolia, the Mongol Empire eventually stretched from Eastern Europe and parts of Central Europe to the Sea of Japan, extending northwards into parts of Siberia; eastwards and southwards into the Indian subcontinent, Mainland Southeast Asia and the Iranian Plateau; and westwards as far as the Levant and the Carpathian Mountains.

Battle of Ain Jalut battle between the Mamluk Sultanate and the Mongol Empire

The Battle of Ain Jalut (Ayn Jalut, in Arabic: عين جالوت, the "Spring of Goliath", or Harod Spring, took place in September 1260 between Muslim Mamluks and the Mongols in the southeastern Galilee, in the Jezreel Valley, in the vicinity of Nazareth, not far from the site of Zir'in.

Khwarazmian dynasty Dynasty of greater Iran

The Khwarazmiandynasty was a Persianate Sunni Muslim dynasty of Turkic mamluk origin. The dynasty ruled large parts of Central Asia and Iran in the approximate period of 1077 to 1231, first as vassals of the Seljuqs and the Qara-Khitan, and later as independent rulers, up until the Mongol invasion of Khwarezmia in the 13th century. The dynasty spanned 2.3 million square kilometers.

Singhasari Hindu-Buddhist kingdom in Java

Singhasari was an Indianized Javanese Hindu–Buddhist kingdom located in east Java between 1222 and 1292. The kingdom succeeded the Kingdom of Kediri as the dominant kingdom in eastern Java. The kingdom's name is cognate to Singosari district of Malang Regency, located several kilometres north of Malang city.

Raden Wijaya King of Majapahit

Raden Wijaya or Raden Vijaya was a Javanese King, the founder and the first monarch of Majapahit empire. The history of his founding of Majapahit was written in several records, including Pararaton and Negarakertagama. His rule was marked by the victory against the army and the navy of Kublai Khan's Yuan dynasty, a division of the Mongol Empire.

Kertanegara of Singhasari King of Singhasari

Kertanegara of Singasari, Kritanagara, or Sivabuddha,, was the last and most important ruler of the Singhasari kingdom of Java, reigning from 1268 to 1292. Under his rule Javanese trade and power developed considerably, reaching the far corners of the Indonesian archipelago.

The Mongol invasion of Java was a military effort made by Kublai Khan, founder of the Yuan dynasty, to invade Java, an island in modern Indonesia. In 1293, he sent a large invasion fleet to Java with 20,000 to 30,000 soldiers. This was a punitive expedition against King Kertanegara of Singhasari, who had refused to pay tribute to the Yuan and maimed one of its ministers. However, it ended with failure for the Mongols.

Christianity in the 13th century Christianity-related events during the 13th century

The Eastern Roman (Byzantine) imperial church headed by Constantinople continued to assert its universal authority. By the 13th century this assertion was becoming increasingly irrelevant as the Eastern Roman Empire shrank and the Ottoman Turks took over most of what was left of the Byzantine Empire. The other Eastern European churches in communion with Constantinople were not part of its empire and were increasingly acting independently, achieving autocephalous status and only nominally acknowledging Constantinople's standing in the Church hierarchy. In Western Europe the Holy Roman Empire fragmented making it less of an empire as well.

Niccolò Polo and Maffeo Polo were Italian traveling merchants best known as the father and uncle, respectively, of the explorer Marco Polo. The brothers went into business before Marco's birth, established trading posts in Constantinople, Sudak in Crimea, and in a western part of the Mongol Empire in Asia. As a duo, they reached modern-day China before temporarily returning to Europe to deliver a message to the Pope. Taking Niccolò's son Marco with them, the Polos then made another journey through Asia, which became the subject of Marco's account The Travels of Marco Polo.

Rajasa was the ruling dynasty of Singhasari kingdom and later Majapahit empire in 13th to 15th century eastern Java. The rulers of Singhasari and Majapahit trace their origins back to the mysterious figure of Ken Arok or Sri Ranggah Rajasa, who founded the Rajasa dynasty early in the 13th century. According to the Pararaton, Ken Arok was born in the Tumapel region. He was considered as the dynasty founder of both the Singhasari and Majapahit line of monarchs.

Jayakatwang was the king of short lived second Kingdom of Kediri of Java, after his overthrow of Kertanegara, the last king of Singhasari. He was eventually defeated by Raden Wijaya, Kertanegara's son-in-law using the troops of the Mongol Yuan dynasty that were invading Java. Raden Wijaya would later turn against the Mongols and found Majapahit, the greatest empire in Java.

Political divisions and vassals of the Mongol Empire

This article dided many political divisions, vassals and tributary states. It was the largest contiguous land empire in history. However, after the death of Möngke Khan, the Toluid Civil War and subsequent wars had led to the [[Division of the Mongol Empire|fragmentof the empire.

Division of the Mongol Empire From 1259 when Möngke Khan died, to 1294

The division of the Mongol Empire began when Möngke Khan died in 1259 in the siege of Diaoyu castle with no declared successor, precipitating infighting between members of the Tolui family line for the title of Great Khan that escalated to the Toluid Civil War. This civil war, along with the Berke–Hulagu war and the subsequent Kaidu–Kublai war, greatly weakened the authority of the Great Khan over the entirety of the Mongol Empire, and the empire fractured into autonomous khanates, including the Golden Horde in the northwest, the Chagatai Khanate in the middle, the Ilkhanate in the southwest, and the Yuan dynasty in the east based in modern-day Beijing, although the Yuan emperors held the nominal title of Khagan of the empire. The four khanates each pursued their own separate interests and objectives and fell at different times.

References

  1. "Ken Angrok". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 25 July 2010.
  2. Qutb Minar and its Monuments, Delhi UNESCO
  3. Grousset, Rene (1988), Empire of steppes, Wars in Japan, Indochina and Java, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, p.  288, ISBN   0-8135-1304-9 .
  4. page 243
  5. History of Aceh Archived August 13, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  6. Weatherford, Jack (2004). Genghis khan and the making of the modern world. New York: Random House. p. 239. ISBN   0-609-80964-4.