1279

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1279 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1279
MCCLXXIX
Ab urbe condita 2032
Armenian calendar 728
ԹՎ ՉԻԸ
Assyrian calendar 6029
Balinese saka calendar 1200–1201
Bengali calendar 686
Berber calendar 2229
English Regnal year 7  Edw. 1   8  Edw. 1
Buddhist calendar 1823
Burmese calendar 641
Byzantine calendar 6787–6788
Chinese calendar 戊寅(Earth  Tiger)
3975 or 3915
     to 
己卯年 (Earth  Rabbit)
3976 or 3916
Coptic calendar 995–996
Discordian calendar 2445
Ethiopian calendar 1271–1272
Hebrew calendar 5039–5040
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1335–1336
 - Shaka Samvat 1200–1201
 - Kali Yuga 4379–4380
Holocene calendar 11279
Igbo calendar 279–280
Iranian calendar 657–658
Islamic calendar 677–678
Japanese calendar Kōan 2
(弘安2年)
Javanese calendar 1189–1190
Julian calendar 1279
MCCLXXIX
Korean calendar 3612
Minguo calendar 633 before ROC
民前633年
Nanakshahi calendar −189
Thai solar calendar 1821–1822
Tibetan calendar 阳土虎年
(male Earth-Tiger)
1405 or 1024 or 252
     to 
阴土兔年
(female Earth-Rabbit)
1406 or 1025 or 253

Year 1279 A.D ( MCCLXXIX ) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

By place

Africa

Asia

Europe

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

13th century Century

The 13th century was the century which lasted from January 1, 1201 (MCCI) through December 31, 1300 (MCCC) in accordance with the Julian calendar. The term is often used to refer to the 1200s, the century between January 1, 1200 and December 31, 1299.

Year 1282 (MCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 1300s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1300, and ended on December 31, 1309.

The 1380s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1380, and ended on December 31, 1389.

The 1360s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1360, and ended on December 31, 1369.

Year 1225 (MCCXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1220s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1220, and ended on December 31, 1229.

The 1270s is the decade starting January 1, 1270, and ending December 31, 1279.

The 1280s is the decade starting January 1, 1280 and ending December 31, 1289.

The 1290s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1290, and ended on December 31, 1299.

Year 1290 (MCCXC) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1274 (MCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1273 (MCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1271 Calendar year

Year 1271 (MCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1253 (MCCLIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1283 (MCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1285 (MCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1287 Calendar year

Year 1287 (MCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Kublai Khan Founding emperor of the Yuan Dynasty, grandson of Genghis Khan

Kublai was the fifth khagan-emperor of the Mongol Empire, reigning as Kublai Emperor (忽必烈皇帝) from 1260 to 1294. He also founded the Yuan dynasty in China as a conquest dynasty in 1271, and ruled as the first Yuan emperor until his death in 1294, posthumously known as Emperor Shizu of Yuan (元世祖).

Political divisions and vassals of the Mongol Empire

This article discusses the political divisions and vassals of the Mongol Empire. Through invasions and conquests the Mongols established a vast empire that included many political divisions, vassals and tributary states. It was the largest contiguous land empire in history. However, after the death of Möngke Khan, the Toluid Civil War and subsequent wars had led to the fragmentation of the Mongol Empire. By 1294, the empire had fractured into four autonomous khanates, including the Golden Horde in the northwest, the Chagatai Khanate in the middle, the Ilkhanate in the southwest, and the Yuan dynasty in the east based in modern-day Beijing, although the Yuan emperors held the nominal title of Khagan of the empire.

References

  1. Meynier, Gilbert (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte. p. 160. ISBN   978-2-7071-5231-2.
  2. Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, page 192